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Iran's Khamenei Says Economy Shouldn't Depend on Trump Losing – BNN

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(Bloomberg) —

Iranians should not rely on a near-term lifting of sanctions or the outcome of the U.S. presidential election to bring relief for the country’s ailing economy, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Sunday.

Khamenei, who has ordered Iran’s government to expand the Islamic Republic’s manufacturing capacity, slash imports and create jobs, said in a video call with President Hassan Rouhani and his cabinet that officials should base their policies on the assumption that sanctions may be around for another decade.

“Economic plans shouldn’t wait for sanctions to be lifted or for the election results of a certain country,” Khamenei said, according to a statement on his official website. The indirect reference is to the U.S., which under President Donald Trump imposed severe sanctions on Iran after withdrawing from the 2015 nuclear deal.

Trump is fighting for re-election on Nov. 3. According to the latest polls he is behind his Democratic challenger Joe Biden — former vice president to Barack Obama, who negotiated the landmark international accord with Iran.

“The assumption should be made that sanctions will continue, for example, for another 10 years,” Khamenei said, adding that the government should crack down on imports of “nonessential luxury goods.” Shortly after, he wrote in a tweet that officials should also stop imports of “a certain luxury U.S. mobile brand,” a reference to Apple Inc.’s iPhone.

Iran’s economy was already suffering because of a tough U.S. sanctions regime before it was hit by a major outbreak of the coronavirus, which has so far killed more than 20,000 people in the country and compounded a budget deficit.

With limited resources to support a prolonged lockdown, Rouhani’s government gradually lifted restrictions on public life and businesses in early April, spurring a surge in coronavirus infections and deaths over the following months.

Struggling Iran Wants Its People to Invest Their Money in Oil

The pandemic has already accelerated government plans to sell off a large number of state assets and issue a record number of bonds. Plans are also underway to monetize the country’s crude oil by establishing a domestic futures market for ordinary investors.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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North Korea tells UN it will focus on economy now that it has ‘effective war deterrent’ – Global News

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An earthquake struck off the coast of Taiwan on Wednesday, swaying buildings in Taipei, the capital.

Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau said the magnitude 5.9 quake struck at a depth of 106 kilometres (66 miles).

There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties.

An Associated Press journalist said the office building where the AP bureau is in Taipei swung slightly for about 10 to 15 seconds.






1:53
Residents survey damage after strong earthquake hits the Philippines


Residents survey damage after strong earthquake hits the Philippines

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© 2020 The Canadian Press

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U.S. housing market to remain a bright spot in a weak economy

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By Hari Kishan and Richa Rebello

BENGALURU (Reuters) – U.S. house prices will continue to surge well into next year and beyond, outpacing inflation and the overall economy, a Reuters poll of property analysts found, making it a bright spot against an otherwise gloomy economic backdrop.

In a stark reversal, the U.S. housing market – at the epicenter of the global financial crisis more than a decade ago – was expected to extend a helping hand to an economy severely battered by the coronavirus pandemic.

Buoyed by record-low interest rates and strong pent-up demand from a segment of the workforce largely unaffected by pandemic-induced job cuts, house prices will continue to rise over the next two years, the Sept. 15-29 poll of over 40 analysts showed.

U.S. house prices were predicted to rise 4.0% this year and by an average 3.5% in 2021 and 2022. That suggests the trend since 2013 of house price rises outpacing consumer inflation would continue for the next three years at least, according to current inflation expectations.

Underscoring the view that the latest data showing a surge in house prices was not just a blip, over 60% of analysts, or 24 of 39 who responded to an additional question, said that trend would continue to hold for at least another year. The remaining 15 said less than a year.

“Three factors support relatively high home prices – undersupply after a decade of underbuilding, single-family housing attractiveness in a socially distancing world, and most importantly low interest rates,” said Nathaniel Karp, chief U.S. economist at BBVA.

“However, economic uncertainty remains elevated and the recovery after the pandemic could take time, which are the risks to the current valuations.”

U.S. house prices outlook: https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/polling/xlbvgjmgepq/Reuters%20Poll-U.S.%20house%20prices%20outlook.PNG

Already tight inventory levels have been squeezed to record lows after construction activity came to a grinding halt because of the coronavirus pandemic, and with no policy relief expected, home buyers may outbid each other and crank up prices.

Existing home sales reached a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 6 million units in August, the highest since the tail end of the previous housing boom in 2006, and were expected to average around 5.5 million units in the coming year.

“A surge in demand has put further strain on an already tight inventory. The latest supply of existing homes dropped below three months (of inventory) for the first time since records began in 1982, and that implies sales will ease back toward the end of the year,” said Matthew Pointon, property economist at Capital Economics.

When asked to rate the affordability on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 as extremely cheap and 10 as very expensive, the poll gave a median of 7, up from 6 in the previous poll when predictions were for house prices to rise at a slower pace than currently expected.

“U.S. home prices are not yet at a level that is concerning,” said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate. “That said, we need significant growth in the number of new homes built to meet current demand. If more units are not provided, we could see unsustainable upward price pressure in the resale market.”

(Reporting by Hari Kishan; Additional reporting and polling by Richa Rebello and Tushar Goenka; Editing by Ross Finley and Andrea Ricci)

Source:- Reuters poll – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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U.S. housing market to remain a bright spot in a weak economy – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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By Hari Kishan and Richa Rebello

BENGALURU (Reuters) – U.S. house prices will continue to surge well into next year and beyond, outpacing inflation and the overall economy, a Reuters poll of property analysts found, making it a bright spot against an otherwise gloomy economic backdrop.

In a stark reversal, the U.S. housing market – at the epicenter of the global financial crisis more than a decade ago – was expected to extend a helping hand to an economy severely battered by the coronavirus pandemic.

Buoyed by record-low interest rates and strong pent-up demand from a segment of the workforce largely unaffected by pandemic-induced job cuts, house prices will continue to rise over the next two years, the Sept. 15-29 poll of over 40 analysts showed.

U.S. house prices were predicted to rise 4.0% this year and by an average 3.5% in 2021 and 2022. That suggests the trend since 2013 of house price rises outpacing consumer inflation would continue for the next three years at least, according to current inflation expectations. [ECILT/US]

Underscoring the view that the latest data showing a surge in house prices was not just a blip, over 60% of analysts, or 24 of 39 who responded to an additional question, said that trend would continue to hold for at least another year. The remaining 15 said less than a year.

“Three factors support relatively high home prices – undersupply after a decade of underbuilding, single-family housing attractiveness in a socially distancing world, and most importantly low interest rates,” said Nathaniel Karp, chief U.S. economist at BBVA.

“However, economic uncertainty remains elevated and the recovery after the pandemic could take time, which are the risks to the current valuations.”

U.S. house prices outlook: https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/polling/xlbvgjmgepq/Reuters%20Poll-U.S.%20house%20prices%20outlook.PNG

Already tight inventory levels have been squeezed to record lows after construction activity came to a grinding halt because of the coronavirus pandemic, and with no policy relief expected, home buyers may outbid each other and crank up prices.

Existing home sales reached a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 6 million units in August, the highest since the tail end of the previous housing boom in 2006, and were expected to average around 5.5 million units in the coming year.

“A surge in demand has put further strain on an already tight inventory. The latest supply of existing homes dropped below three months (of inventory) for the first time since records began in 1982, and that implies sales will ease back toward the end of the year,” said Matthew Pointon, property economist at Capital Economics.

When asked to rate the affordability on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 as extremely cheap and 10 as very expensive, the poll gave a median of 7, up from 6 in the previous poll when predictions were for house prices to rise at a slower pace than currently expected.

“U.S. home prices are not yet at a level that is concerning,” said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate. “That said, we need significant growth in the number of new homes built to meet current demand. If more units are not provided, we could see unsustainable upward price pressure in the resale market.”

(Reporting by Hari Kishan; Additional reporting and polling by Richa Rebello and Tushar Goenka; Editing by Ross Finley and Andrea Ricci)

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