Connect with us

Science

Is there really life on Venus? How do we find out?

Published

 on

Last week, an unlikely research project made a startling discovery: Phosphine gas in the atmosphere of Venus. That’s something that, as far as we know, is created by living organisms. Our efforts to find signs of life on other worlds, and a lot of our space dreaming in general, tend to focus on Mars. But all of a sudden we need to take a closer look at our other planetary neighbour.

So how can we find out if there’s really life right next door? What do we know about Venus and why has it been so hard to figure out so far? What else could possibly cause the presence of Phosphine and what would it mean, to space exploration and everything else, if this is really true?

GUEST: Neel Patel, space reporter, MIT Technology Review

Source:- KitchenerToday.com

Source link

Continue Reading

Science

'One of the rarest species of shark in the world' captured in amazing video – CNET

Published

 on


This short-tail catshark (Parmaturus bigus), seen at the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, is a rare sight.


Schmidt Ocean video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Great whites might be the jumbo stars of the shark world, but there are some equally fascinating members on the other side of the size spectrum. The crew of the research vessel Falkor experienced the wonders of the deep when it spotted “one of the rarest species of sharks in the world” during a recent Schmidt Ocean Institute mission.

Shark expert Will White with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science research agency, identified the short-tail catshark Parmaturus bigus from footage captured during an exploration of the Great Barrier Reef on Oct. 17. Falkor’s remotely operated submersible SuBastian got a good look at the big-eyed creature. 

Though you can chill out and enjoy the hours of underwater footage and scientific commentary, the shark appears a little over two hours into this video. “It’s a shark!” the scientists comment as they zoom in.

Researchers have collected only one specimen of Parmaturus bigus, which is held in the Australian National Fish Collection. The one spotted lounging on the sand was a male estimated to be around 20 inches (50 cm) long. The remotely operated vehicle was able to follow it as it swam off.

Even better, the ocean researchers discovered they had filmed another specimen during a dive back in May but hadn’t identified it at the time. The team also found footage of an egg case from the short-tail catshark, giving scientists a wealth of new information about the species and its habitat.

“Through the efforts of the Falkor team, we now have three more records of one of the world’s rarest sharks,” Schmidt Ocean said in a statement Monday, including “the first footage of a living specimen.”

Schmidt Ocean expeditions have gifted us some extraordinary views of the marvels of the deep in recent years, from a stunningly bizarre siphonophore to a wild “benthic tornado.” The catshark fits in beautifully with this impressive track record of discovery.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

There will be a blue Hunter's Moon this Halloween – Yahoo Canada Sports

Published

 on


Full moon and clouds at nightFull moon and clouds at night

View photos

The October full moon is known as a Hunter’s Moon (Getty)
<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Appropriately for the spookiest night of the year, there’ll be something unusual going on in the sky this Halloween – a blue Hunter’s Moon.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”32″>Appropriately for the spookiest night of the year, there’ll be something unusual going on in the sky this Halloween – a blue Hunter’s Moon

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The moon will not (sadly) be blue, but it’s the second full moon in the month which makes it a blue moon (by some definitions at least, see below).&nbsp;” data-reactid=”33″>The moon will not (sadly) be blue, but it’s the second full moon in the month which makes it a blue moon (by some definitions at least, see below). 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Full moons are separated by 29 days, NASA says, and most months are 30 or 31 days long, so a “blue moon” happens every two and a half years on average.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”34″>Full moons are separated by 29 days, NASA says, and most months are 30 or 31 days long, so a “blue moon” happens every two and a half years on average. 

Full moons occur when the moon appears as a full circle in the sky, when the whole side of the moon facing the Earth is lit up by the sun.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: Five moon myths (and how to disprove them yourself)&nbsp;” data-reactid=”36″>Read more: Five moon myths (and how to disprove them yourself) 

The moon will be full at 2.49pm on October 31, according to Royal Museums Greenwich. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="A blog post at Royal Museums Greenwich explains, “It may at first seem odd to think of a full Moon occurring during daylight hours.” data-reactid=”38″>A blog post at Royal Museums Greenwich explains, “It may at first seem odd to think of a full Moon occurring during daylight hours.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“The reason this happens is that the time refers to the exact moment when the Sun and Moon are aligned on opposite sides of the Earth.

“This moment is known as the ‘syzygy’ of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, and can happen at any time day or night.”” data-reactid=”39″>“The reason this happens is that the time refers to the exact moment when the Sun and Moon are aligned on opposite sides of the Earth.

“This moment is known as the ‘syzygy’ of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, and can happen at any time day or night.”

NASA expert Gordon Johnston explains that American names for Full Moons are derived from Native American folklore.

Johnston writes, “The Maine Farmer’s Almanac first published Native American names for the full Moons in the 1930s. 

This image was taken in Tuam county galway. Ireland.This image was taken in Tuam county galway. Ireland.

View photos

Blue moons, despite the name, are not actually blue. Stock, Galway, Ireland (Getty)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“Over time these names have become widely known and used.

“The Hunter’s Moon is the full Moon after the Harvest Moon. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, with the leaves falling and the deer fattened, it is time to hunt.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”62″>“Over time these names have become widely known and used.

“The Hunter’s Moon is the full Moon after the Harvest Moon. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, with the leaves falling and the deer fattened, it is time to hunt. 

“Since the harvesters have reaped the fields, hunters can easily see the animals that have come out to glean (and the foxes that have come out to prey on them). 

“The earliest use of the term “Hunter’s Moon” cited in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1710.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: What is a supermoon?&nbsp;” data-reactid=”65″>Read more: What is a supermoon? 

Strictly speaking, the definition of a “blue moon” as the second full moon in a given month is wrong – but it is now widely used, says Royal Museums Greenwich. 

Royal Museums Greenwich writes, ‘Traditionally the definition of a blue moon is the third full Moon in an astronomical season containing four full moons. The astronomical seasons begin and end at the equinoxes and solstices (e.g. the winter season begins at the winter solstice and ends at the spring equinox, the spring season begins at the spring equinox and ends at the summer solstice and so on).”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“Another definition of the blue moon, perhaps the more commonly used due to its simplicity, is actually a mistake, made in the 1940s and perpetuated by radio shows and the Trivial Pursuit board game through the 1980s.

“This definition describes the blue moon as the second full Moon in any calendar month with two full moons.”” data-reactid=”68″>“Another definition of the blue moon, perhaps the more commonly used due to its simplicity, is actually a mistake, made in the 1940s and perpetuated by radio shows and the Trivial Pursuit board game through the 1980s.

“This definition describes the blue moon as the second full Moon in any calendar month with two full moons.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

'Massive' coral reef taller than the Empire State Building discovered in Australia – CTV News

Published

 on


A “massive” new reef measuring 500 metres has been discovered in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, making it taller than some of the world’s highest skyscrapers.

Scientists found the detached reef, which is the first to be discovered in more than 120 years, in waters off North Queensland while on an expedition aboard research vessel Falkor, ocean research organization Schmidt Ocean Institute announced Monday.

The reef was first discovered on October 20, as scientists completed an underwater mapping of the seafloor of the northern Great Barrier Reef.

At 500 metres high, it is taller than the Empire State Building (381 metres to the top floor), the Sydney Tower (305 metres) and the Petronas Twin Towers (451.9 metres.)

Using an underwater robot named SuBastian, the team explored the reef on Sunday, and live streamed footage of the exploration.

Experts say that the base of the “blade-like” reef measures 1.5 kilometres wide, rising 500 metres to its shallowest depth of 40 metres below the ocean surface.

There are seven other tall detached reefs in the area, including the reef at Raine Island — a significant green turtle nesting site.

Robin Beaman, who led the expedition, said he was “surprised” by the discovery.

“To not only 3D map the reef in detail, but also visually see this discovery with SuBastian is incredible,” he said in a statement.

“This unexpected discovery affirms that we continue to find unknown structures and new species in our ocean,” Wendy Schmidt, co-founder of Schmidt Ocean Institute, said in a statement.

“The state of our knowledge about what’s in the ocean has long been so limited. Thanks to new technologies that work as our eyes, ears and hands in the deep ocean, we have the capacity to explore like never before. New oceanscapes are opening to us, revealing the ecosystems and diverse life forms that share the planet with us.”

The Great Barrier Reef, the world’s largest coral reef, covers more than 214,000 square kilometres and is home to more than 1,500 species of fish, 411 species of hard corals and dozens of other species.

But the reef is facing a crisis — recent studies have shown that it has lost 50% of its coral populations in the last three decades, with climate change a key driver of reef disturbance.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending