adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Investment

Jeff Bezos-Backed Arrived Homes Surpasses 200 Single-Family Investment Properties Funded

Published

 on

The fractional real estate investment platform Arrived Homes hit a major milestone this month – funding its 200th single-family home. The company has now funded 203 investment properties with a total value of more than $75 million.

The homes were all funded by retail investors, who put up as little as $100 each to buy shares of the properties.

Why would investors buy shares of single-family homes? Most of the properties funded on the platform are leased out to long-term tenants, who pay monthly rent that trickles down to each shareholder in the form of quarterly dividends. The rest of the homes are used as short-term rentals – rented on a nightly basis through sites like Airbnb.

Investors are also expected to benefit from appreciation over the long term. When the properties are eventually sold, the equity will be distributed among the shareholders.

300x250x1

The idea of fractional investment in rental properties caught the attention of Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos early on. The billionaire invested in Arrived Homes’ $37 million seed round in 2021 through his Bezos Expedition fund. Bezos was joined by several other high-profile investors, such as Salesforce.com founder Marc Benioff through Time Ventures, former Zillow Group CEO Spencer Rascoff and Uber Technologies CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who also invested in the real estate investment platform.

Bezos increased his bet on the investment platform earlier this year by making another investment during the company’s $25 million Series A round.

Fractional real estate has become a popular asset class for retail investors, especially since the stock market has been experiencing extreme volatility over the past couple of years and cryptocurrency has shown few signs that it can recover to its previous price levels.

Arrived Homes CEO Ryan Frazier said, “While Americans consistently rank real estate as the best long-term investment, it has been notoriously challenging. By allowing anybody to buy shares in a professionally managed rental home in less than four minutes and starting at $100, Arrived has made investing in real estate as easy as buying a book on Amazon.”

The investment platform doesn’t appear to be slowing down, despite the uncertainty in the housing market. The company’s website shows four new offerings set to go live, including three long-term rentals and one short-term rental.

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

OMERS names capital markets head as next chief investment officer – The Globe and Mail

Published

 on


Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System (OMERS) has named capital markets head Ralph Berg as its next chief investment officer, succeeding Satish Rai.

Mr. Berg starts as CIO on April 1 after two years as global head of OMERS Capital Markets, where he oversaw the public-market investments that make up more than half of investment assets at the pension plan.

In April, Mr. Rai will move to an advisory role and plans to retire from OMERS late in 2024. He has been CIO since 2018 and also led OMERS’ capital markets arm during his eight years at the pension plan, while helping guide its expansion into Asian markets. He was previously CIO at TD Asset Management, a division of Toronto-Dominion Bank.

300x250x1

Mr. Berg has been at OMERS since 2013. He joined the pension plan as global head of its infrastructure arm after a career in banking at Credit Suisse Group AG and Deutsche Bank AG.

“Ralph is a proven investor and a seasoned executive,” said OMERS chief executive officer Blake Hutcheson, in a news release.

Mr. Berg’s successor as head of capital markets has yet to be announced.

OMERS had $119.5-billion of assets as of June 30 last year. Over Mr. Rai’s tenure as CIO, it has shifted more of its assets from public to private markets, which helped OMERS post steady results in the first half of last year, losing only 0.4 per cent despite difficult market conditions.

That came after two volatile years in the COVID-19 pandemic that included an 11.4-per-cent loss in 2020 – when OMERS marked down real estate and private equity holdings that were affected by strict public health measures – and a rebound in 2021 that saw the plan’s assets gain 15.7-per-cent.

As Mr. Rai prepares to step down, Mr. Hutcheson said: “I look forward to his continued commitment and counsel” in his advisory role.

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Ark Invest Cathie Wood: artificial intelligence chatGPT – CNBC

Published

 on


Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

300x250x1
Continue Reading

Investment

Forget ChatGPT — an AI-driven investment fund powered by IBM's Watson supercomputer is quietly beating the market by nearly 100% – Yahoo Canada Finance

Published

 on


The Watson-powered ETF is beating a total market fund by nearly 100%.PhonlamaiPhoto/Getty Images

  • While the language bot ChatGPT has gone viral, a Watson-powered ETF is making nearly double the returns of the broader market.

  • The AI Powered Equity ETF is up 10.4% in 2023, whereas the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index is up 5.67%.

  • IBM’s Watson supercomputer helps balance the fund’s portfolio holdings.

The popular language bot ChatGPT has shown a humanlike ability to render articles, emails, and even dating-app messages. But if you ask it to generate a portfolio that can beat the market, it spits out boilerplate information and reminds you it doesn’t have access to live stock data.

Yet, the $102 million AI Powered Equity ETF (AIEQ), which launched in 2017, has been quietly fulfilling that request so far this year. Issued by ETF Managers Group in partnership with the fintech firm Equbot, the fund leans on IBM’s Watson supercomputer to balance its portfolio.

That 114-holding portfolio is up 10.4% so far in 2023, while the Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF is up 5% over the same stretch.

300x250x1

Still, as ETF.com highlighted, the former is actively managed, and thus more expensive than the benchmark fund, cutting into actual returns to investors. The AI-powered ETF charges 0.75%, whereas Vanguard’s costs 0.03%. Both funds include JPMorgan and UnitedHealth Group in their top-10 holdings.

Chris Natividad, the chief investment officer of Equbot, said the Watson-powered fund can look beyond standard market data and cull information from tweets and earnings calls, according to ETF.com.

“We’re focused on investment related data, looking at how these different types of signals impact security practices across different time horizons,” Natividad said, per ETF.com.

“The best days of the fund are still ahead of it,” he added. “And just as you’ll see ChatGPT’s responses change and evolve with time and data, so will our fund.”

Meanwhile, ChatGPT’s parent company, OpenAI, this month secured a $10 billion investment from Microsoft this month, and the technology continues to make waves across sectors.

Online media outlet BuzzFeed announced last week it plans to leverage the technology to create content, educators are warning about the bot’s repercussions in schools, and chipmakers are poised to cash in.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending