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Kansas City Braces for Impending Storm with Strong Winds and Hail Threat

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Kansas City Braces for Impending Storm

Kansas City – An urgent news bulletin has been issued, warning residents of the Kansas City metro area about an approaching storm that is set to unleash its fury with potent winds and damaging hail. This old-time report calls upon all citizens to stay alert and safeguard themselves against the imminent natural tempest.

The predicted storm, expected to sweep into the region during the afternoon hours, brings with it ominous threats. Weather experts anticipate gusts of wind reaching up to [specify wind speed], likely to rattle rooftops and uproot weak trees. Alongside, menacing hailstones, some as large as [specify hail size], are feared to descend, potentially inflicting harm on properties, vehicles, and everything in their path.

Authorities, well aware of the potential perils, urge folks to keep a watchful eye on the skies and pay heed to timely warnings. Turn to local news gazettes, or perhaps the wise radio, for up-to-the-minute weather forecasts and vital safety advisories.

The prudent advice from the experienced weather-watchers is as follows:

  1. Take Refuge: When the tempest roars, find a safe haven indoors, away from glass panes. Retreat to a basement or a cozy nook within your dwelling’s bowels.
  2. Fasten All Outside Gear: The wind is known to snatch loose items and set them on an airborne journey. Latch down your cherished garden tools and other belongings to a firm anchor.
  3. Steer Clear of the Road: Should you be blessed with the option, refrain from venturing out on horseless carriages during the storm’s rage. Hail and ferocious winds make the roads treacherous.
  4. Stay In the Loop: Ensure you possess a weather radio powered by trusty batteries or a trusty handset to receive live updates and warnings from the weather seers.

In solidarity with our brave emergency responders, who stand vigilant in the face of impending calamity, we ask all good folks to heed their counsel and comply with any instructions delivered during this tempest’s fury.

For any mishaps or dire straits that the storm may bring, do not hesitate to dispatch a message via [local emergency contact number] for swift assistance.

In the spirit of community, we urge all neighbors to look out for one another, as olden values dictate, and brace for the pending storm with fortitude and caution. May the heavens guide us safely through this tumultuous ordeal.

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Adventure-seeking B.C. couple were victims found on Nova Scotia island: relative

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HALIFAX – The British Columbia couple whose remains recently washed ashore on Nova Scotia’s remote Sable Island have been identified as 70-year-old James Brett Clibbery and his 54-year-old wife, Sarah Packwood.

Clibbery’s sister, Lynda Spielman, said today the RCMP have confirmed their identities.

Spielman, a Calgary resident, says she’s heard many theories about what happened to the adventurous couple after June 11 when they left Halifax harbour in a 13-metre sailboat en route to the Azores — a 3,200-kilometre journey.

Spielman declined to speculate on what went wrong, and the Mounties have said they are still investigating.

On Monday, the RCMP confirmed they had identified Clibbery’s body with the help of the province’s medical examiner’s office, but they declined to release his name, citing privacy legislation.

The Mounties previously confirmed the couple’s sailboat, Theros, was reported missing on June 18, and it wasn’t until July 10 that their bodies were found in a three-metre inflatable boat on Sable Island, about 280 kilometres southeast of Halifax.

Clibbery and Packwood, who lived on B.C.’s Salt Spring Island, described themselves as adventure travellers and posted details of their voyages on a YouTube channel called Theros Adventures.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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LCBO stores reopen across Ontario after two-week strike by workers

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TORONTO – Hundreds of Ontario’s liquor stores reopened Tuesday following a strike that lasted more than two weeks, but the fighting between the union representing workers and the government dragged on.

About 10,000 Liquor Control Board of Ontario workers had returned Monday to prepare for the opening of nearly 700 stores after they walked off the job on July 5.

The Ontario Public Service Employees Union, which represents LCBO workers, had said the labour dispute was largely about Premier Doug Ford’s plan to allow convenience and grocery stores to sell ready-to-drink cocktails. The expanded sales, it said, was an existential threat to the workers’ future.

The sniping continued Tuesday as the union took umbrage with Ford’s comments from Monday, when he said the strike should never have happened.

The union said it made “significant gains” as a direct result of the strike.

“LCBO workers are proud of what they achieved in this contract, which wouldn’t have been possible without the strike,” said Colleen MacLeod, chair of the union’s LCBO bargaining unit. “They’re also happy to get back to work serving their communities again.”

The three-year deal, which the LCBO workers ratified over the weekend, sees an eight per cent wage increase over three years, the conversion of about 1,000 casual employees to permanent part-time positions and no store closures over the course of the agreement.

The union said converting those casual positions into 1,000 permanent part-time jobs and the guarantee of no closures for the duration of the contract was not on the table before the strike.

As part of the reopening, the LCBO said there will no longer be limits placed on online orders, but those orders could take up to three weeks for delivery.

Outside one LCBO in Toronto’s west end, Jay Brafman lambasted both sides for the strike.

“I think (the union) basically held hostage Ontarians and that’s not the right way to get more out of your job,” he said.

Brafman, a fan of the government’s plan to expand alcohol sales into convenience stores, also criticized Ford.

“If he really wanted to show some courage, he would have liquidated the LCBO,” he said.

Brafman, a vodka drinker, was put out during the strike as the LCBO is the main seller of spirits across the province.

“It cost me a ton of money having to go out to bars if I wanted to drink,” he said, adding that he’s happy the stores are open again.

Ford’s previous plan was to get beer, wine and ready-to-drink cocktails in convenience stores and all grocery stores by 2026, completing a 2018 election campaign promise. But in May he announced that would instead happen this year, capping speculation of an early election that Ford did not outright deny.

Convenience stores will be allowed to sell beer, wine and coolers starting Sept. 5 while newly licensed grocery stores can do so starting Oct. 31.

An “early implementation agreement” with The Beer Store involves the province paying the company up to $225 million to help it keep stores open and workers employed. The province is also giving brewers a rebate on an LCBO fee that normally brings in $45 million a year, and it is giving retailers a 10 per cent wholesale discount.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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Latest facts about British Columbia’s wildfire situation on July 23

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These are the facts about British Columbia’s wildfire situation, according to the BC Wildfire Service dashboard at 11.30 a.m. Tuesday.

Active fires: 380

Wildfires of note: Four. Shetland Creek fire, Kamloops Fire Centre; Antler Creek fire, Cariboo Fire Centre; Aylwin Creek fire, Southeast Fire Centre; Komonko Creek fire, Southeast Fire Centre.

Fires started in last 24 hours: 78

Out-of-control fires: 228

Active fire causes: Lightning 81 per cent, human 7 per cent, undetermined 12 per cent (percentages are rounded)

Firefighting staff deployed: 1,041

Aircraft deployed: 183

Area burned since April 1: 7,534 square kilometres (recalculated by BC Wildfire Service)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.

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