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Launch of art bank, arts grants on P.E.I. for Indigenous artists – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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Government is launching two new art programs that celebrate and support the accomplishments of P.E.I. Mi’kmaq and other Indigenous artists living in P.E.I.

The  P.E.I. Indigenous Art Bank acquires, loans and displays art that was purchased or donated and pieces will be displayed in public spaces. The Indigenous Arts Grants provide funding to assist and encourage the work of the Indigenous arts community in the province.

The programs were developed in partnership with P.E.I. Mi’kmaq artists and artisans and with guidance from best practices across federal and provincial jurisdictions. They will provide Mi’kmaq and other Indigenous artists with increased opportunities to learn, create and share their work. 

“There’s a saying we use, nothing about us without us. It’s nice to finally have something for us, by us,” said Patricia Bourque, consultant for the Indigenous arts programs. “The past support I received from provincial art grants has helped me access resources and build my confidence and passion for creating.”

Successful applicants will be selected by a jury of their Indigenous art community peers.  

Indigenous art is a powerful form of visual storytelling, said P.E.I. Premier Dennis King, who is also the minister responsible for Indigenous relations.

Whether the art is about their personal journey or the history of the P.E.I. Mi’kmaq, they tell stories that will encourage everyone to reflect on how Islanders can promote a fair and inclusive province.

“From the materials they use to the traditional techniques, every element has meaning and intent,” he said. “Creating a dedicated Indigenous Art Bank and Arts Grants gives all Islanders a chance to see beautiful pieces of art and at the same time, learn about Indigenous culture through the artists’ work. 

Culture Minister Matthew MacKay said these new programs are examples of the commitment to maintaining and growing Indigenous culture in Prince Edward Island, in the spirit of friendship and reconciliation

“We value the traditions and identity of Indigenous artists, and our hope is that these programs will help enhance their contribution to Prince Edward Island’s cultural richness.”


At a glance

  • To learn more about the P.E.I. Indigenous Art Bank and to apply, click here
  • To learn more about the Indigenous Arts Grants and to apply, click here.
  • To apply for the P.E.I. Indigenous Art Bank jury, click here.
  • To apply for the Indigenous Arts Grants jury, click here.

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Victoria art centre offers free therapeutic art sessions – Saanich News – Saanich News

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The Bateman Foundation hopes to harness the healing power of creativity with a series of free therapeutic art sessions.

Materials are provided for the free drop-in sessions, and an on-site art therapist will be available for assistance or mental wellness insight.

“It’s learning about art and nature and using those as tools for wellness,” says Lauren Ball, spokesperson for the Bateman Foundation. “We (wanted) to help people to feel a bit more powerful in their daily lives.”

In the summer of 2020 the foundation launched the Wellness Project, adapting its annual Nature Sketch program for the pandemic and providing it free of charge to small groups in the community.

The new drop-in therapeutic art sessions are an extension of that program, says Bell, and a direct response to the effects of the ongoing pandemic.

READ ALSO: Nature Sketch program returns in Victoria with COVID-19 safety protocols

“Knowing that anxiety and depression are on the rise on this mass scale because of social isolation, we wanted to help in some way,” she said.

“It’s not about being a really great artist, it’s not necessarily about the final result of what you create, it’s about tapping into the creative potential and creative energy that exists within all of us, and using that to find some sense of joy, some sense of peace.”

Art therapist Kaitlin McManus will be on site to help participants who want to discover meaning in their artwork while they are creating.

All ages and experience level are welcome. Four people can participate simultaneously for 30 minutes each, unless there is no one waiting to join, in which case artists can stay longer.

Sessions run twice a week at the Bateman Gallery at 300-470 Belleville St. on Tuesday evenings from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and on Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Appointments are not necessary.

READ ALSO: Renowned photographer’s work captured at the Bateman Gallery


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: nina.grossman@blackpress.ca. Follow us on Instagram.
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Victoria art centre offers free therapeutic art sessions – Victoria News – Victoria News

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The Bateman Foundation hopes to harness the healing power of creativity with a series of free therapeutic art sessions.

Materials are provided for the free drop-in sessions, and an on-site art therapist will be available for assistance or mental wellness insight.

“It’s learning about art and nature and using those as tools for wellness,” says Lauren Ball, spokesperson for the Bateman Foundation. “We (wanted) to help people to feel a bit more powerful in their daily lives.”

In the summer of 2020 the foundation launched the Wellness Project, adapting its annual Nature Sketch program for the pandemic and providing it free of charge to small groups in the community.

The new drop-in therapeutic art sessions are an extension of that program, says Bell, and a direct response to the effects of the ongoing pandemic.

READ ALSO: Nature Sketch program returns in Victoria with COVID-19 safety protocols

“Knowing that anxiety and depression are on the rise on this mass scale because of social isolation, we wanted to help in some way,” she said.

“It’s not about being a really great artist, it’s not necessarily about the final result of what you create, it’s about tapping into the creative potential and creative energy that exists within all of us, and using that to find some sense of joy, some sense of peace.”

Art therapist Kaitlin McManus will be on site to help participants who want to discover meaning in their artwork while they are creating.

All ages and experience level are welcome. Four people can participate simultaneously for 30 minutes each, unless there is no one waiting to join, in which case artists can stay longer.

Sessions run twice a week at the Bateman Gallery at 300-470 Belleville St. on Tuesday evenings from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and on Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Appointments are not necessary.

READ ALSO: Renowned photographer’s work captured at the Bateman Gallery


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: nina.grossman@blackpress.ca. Follow us on Instagram.
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

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Fredericton group hopes to connect people with street art and horse barns – CBC.ca

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Artists, get out your spray cans. 

The Fredericton Trails Coalition wants to revitalize part of the city trail between Rookwood Avenue and Smythe Street, near the New Brunswick Exhibition horse barns. 

“It’s nothing but a big canvas,” said Stephen Marr, vice-president of the Fredericton Trails Coalition. 

So, the group hopes to turn it into a huge mural and is looking for proposals.

The idea came about last year, when organizers were trying to come up with ways to celebrate the community trails — while following physical distancing rules because of COVID-19.

Bringing history and art together 

“It’s something that’s happening all over Canada,” he said. 

For years, the horse barns have been spray painted with bubble letters or funny looking smiley faces.

“Why not beautify it and put something meaningful on there that would actually become a destination for people on the trail?” he said.

The canvas is about 100 metres long and art applications are pretty open-ended.

“If you pigeonhole them you’re not going to allow them their creativity,” he said

There are a lot of people who pass by the area while cycling to work or out for a stroll with kids. So the group is hoping for something that focuses on community and its history.

“The topics are just too numerous to count.”

‘It’s about community’

A call for artists was sent out in the middle of February.

The group has received about 28 applications so far. People have until the end of March to apply.

Then, the proposals will be evaluated by Fredericton’s art community, including gallery owners and art instructors. 

Five artists will be selected in June. Then, they will be asked to do a mockup of the canvas.

The finalist will be announced on June 15, and will get to work after Canada Day. The artist will receive about $20,000 for the project and potential grants.

The artwork is expected to be finished by September. The paint is expected to last five to six years.

Marr said he isn’t worried about taggers destroying the artwork. He said there’s an unwritten rule between taggers that once a mural goes up, it’s off limits. 

“It’s about community involvement and appreciation and inclusiveness on the trails.”

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