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Look up tonight to see the peak of the Leonid Meteor Shower – The Weather Network US

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If your skies are clear tonight, take an hour off to head outside, find a nice place to stargaze from, and sit back to watch the peak of the Leonid meteor shower.

Each year, throughout much of November, Earth passes through a stream of icy debris left behind by a comet known as 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. As the atmosphere sweeps up bits of dust and ice from the comet trail, these meteoroids flash through the air as bright meteors.

On or around the 17th of November, we pass through the highest debris concentration in the stream. This results in perhaps a dozen or so of these bright meteors streaking through the night sky every hour. This is the peak of the Leonid meteor shower.

The debris stream of Comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, orbiting the Sun in relation to the planets of the inner solar system. Earth and Earth’s orbit are shown in light blue. Credit: Meteorshowers.org

The Leonids aren’t usually a very strong meteor shower. The best of the year — the January Quadrantids, the August Perseids, and the December Geminids — all produce around 100 meteors per hour. In contrast, if you find a dark sky site, far from any light pollution, and you have a clear, moonless night, you may see around 15 Leonid meteors each hour.

Some years, dozens and sometimes hundreds of Leonids can streak across the sky. This is especially true right after Comet Tempel-Tuttle has made its most recent pass around the Sun. The last time this happened was right after the comet’s 1998 perihelion (its closest point to the Sun in its orbit). In the years that followed, several outbursts were recorded by astronomers, including nearly 100 meteors during the peak of 2008.

Back in 1833, the Leonids even produced a famous meteor storm. One report from the time estimated that over 240,000 meteors were spotted throughout the night. At the same time, another said that the rate was over 100,000 meteors per hour for the 9-hour storm.

Leonids-1833-woodcut-Adolf-VollmyThis wood engraving, from Adolf Vollmy’s Bible Readings for the Home Circle, depicts the 1833 Leonids meteor storm.

We haven’t seen anything like this storm in recent times. Also, more outbursts aren’t expected from this shower until at least 2031. Still, this is a shower worthy of our attention, though.

One remarkable thing about Leonid meteors, though — they’re exceptionally fast. Travelling at over 70 kilometres per second through the sky, they flash very brightly and, at times, show up multi-coloured! They are also known to produce a lingering phenomenon known as persistent trains.

A persistent train forms when a meteoroid travels so fast that it strips away electrons from the air molecules in its path. These ionized air molecules linger along the meteoroid’s path, and each one emits a brief burst of light when it picks up a replacement electron to neutralize that ionization. This shows up as a wispy, dimly-glowing ribbon in the sky. Trains are known to persist for some time after the meteor has gone out — from minutes to hours!

Watch below: Rare persistent train meteor captured by Gemini Observatory over Mauna Kea

(Hat-tip to astronomer Daniel Moser for the video.)

Of the Fall meteor showers, the Leonids are the most well-known for producing persistent trains.

TIPS FOR STARGAZING & METEOR WATCHING

First, some honest truth: Many people who want to watch a meteor shower end up missing out on the experience, unnecessarily.

Since the Moon and most planets are so bright in the night sky, it’s easy to fall into the expectation that watching a meteor shower will be just as easy. It takes a bit of travel and effort to get the most out of a meteor shower, but it is well worth it!

First off, there’s no need to have a telescope or binoculars to watch a meteor shower. They’ll actually make it harder to see the event because they restrict your field of view.

Here are the three ‘best practices’ for watching meteor showers:

  • Check the weather,
  • Get away from light pollution, and
  • Be patient.

Clear skies are very important for meteor-spotting. Even a few hours of cloudy skies can ruin an attempt to see a meteor shower. So, be sure to check The Weather Network on TV, on our website, or from our app, and look for my articles on our Space News page, just to be sure that you have the most up-to-date sky forecast.

Next, you need to get away from city light pollution. If you look up into the sky, are the only bright lights you see street lights or signs, the Moon, maybe a planet or two, and passing airliners? If so, your sky is just not dark enough for you to see any meteors. You might catch a bright fireball, but there’s no guarantee, and those are typically few and far between. So, get out of the city, and the farther away you can get, the better!

Watch: What light pollution is doing to city views of the Milky Way

For most regions of Canada, getting out from under light pollution is simply a matter of driving outside of your city, town or village until a multitude of stars is visible above your head. In some areas, such as in southwestern and central Ontario and along the St. Lawrence River, the concentration of light pollution is too high. Unfortunately, getting far enough outside of one city to escape its light pollution tends to put you under the light pollution dome of the next city over.

In these areas of concentrated light pollution, there are dark sky preserves. However, a skywatcher’s best bet for dark skies is usually to drive north and seek out the various Ontario provincial parks or Quebec provincial parks. Even if you’re confined to the parking lot after hours, these are usually excellent locations from which to watch (and you don’t run the risk of trespassing on someone’s property).

Sometimes, based on the timing, the Moon is also a source of light pollution, and it can wash out all but the brightest meteors. We can’t get away from the Moon, so we can just make do as best we can in these situations.

Once you’ve verified you have clear skies and you’ve gotten away from light pollution, this is where having patience comes in.

For best viewing, you must give your eyes time to adapt to the dark. Give yourself at least 20 minutes, but the longer, the better. A fair warning: if you skip this step, you will likely miss out on a lot of the action.

During this adjustment time, avoid all bright light sources — overhead lights, car headlights and interior lights, and cellphone and tablet screens. Any exposure to bright light during this period will cancel out some or all the progress you’ve made, forcing you to start over. Shield your eyes from light sources. If you need to use your cellphone during this time, set the display to reduce the amount of blue light it gives off and reduce the screen’s brightness as much as possible. It may also be worth finding an app that puts your phone into ‘night mode’, which will shift the screen colours into the red end of the light spectrum, which has less of an impact on your night vision.

You can certainly look up into the starry sky while you are letting your eyes adjust. You may even see a few brighter meteors as your eyes become accustomed to the dark. If the Moon is shining brightly, turn so that it is out of your personal field of view.

Once you’re all set, just look straight up!

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Province Announces Windsor Essex Is Moving To Red 'Control' Status – windsoriteDOTca News

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Ontario Ministry of Health graphic

The province of Ontario announced Friday that Windsor Essex will be moving to Red, or “Control” status under the province’s COVID-19 response framework.

The changes will come into effect on Monday, November 30th 12:01am.

“The health and safety of all Ontarians is and will always be our top priority, that’s why we are following the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and other health experts and making this adjustment today,” said Christine Elliott, Deputy Premier and Minister of Health. “Over the last week we have seen a shift in the trends of key public health indicators in regions across the province, and by moving [regions to new levels] in the framework, we can ensure that the necessary targeted measures are in place to stop the spread of the virus and allow us to keep our schools and businesses open.”

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Windsor-Essex joins four other regions moving to different levels under the framework. Haldimand-Norfolk Health Unit is moving to Orange-Restrict, and Hastings Prince Edward Public Health, Lambton Public Health, and Northwestern Health Unit are moving to Yellow-Protect.

The Red status is one status away from the province’s Lockdown status.

Red ‘Control’ status means the following, according to the province:

Changes from Orange – Restrict to Red – Control are marked in red.

Organized public events, social gatherings and religious services, rites and ceremonies

  • Limits for all organized public events and social gatherings:
    • 5 people indoors
    • 25 people outdoors
  • Limits for religious services rites or ceremonies, including wedding services and funeral services (apply regardless of the venue where held):
    • 30% capacity of the room indoors
    • 100 people outdoors

Restaurants, bars and other food and drink establishments

  • Maximum number of patrons permitted to be seated indoors is 10
  • Outdoor dining, take out, drive through, and delivery permitted, including alcohol
  • Require patrons to be seated; 2 metre minimum or impermeable barrier required between tables
  • Limit of 4 people may be seated together
  • Dancing, singing and the live performance of music is prohibited
  • Require contact information for all seated patrons
  • No buffet style service
  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metres distance and face covering required
  • Face coverings required except when eating or drinking only
  • Personal protective equipment, including eye protection required when is a worker must come within 2 metres of another person who is not wearing a face covering
  • Establishments must be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 10 p.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • Night clubs and strip clubs only permitted to operate as restaurant or bar
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Sports and recreational fitness facilities

  • Gyms and fitness studios permitted to be open with maximum of:
    • 10 people indoors or 25 people outdoors in classes; and
    • 10 people indoors in areas with weights or exercise equipment
  • No spectators permitted (exemption for parent and guardian supervision of children)
  • Increase spacing between patrons to 3 metres for areas of a sport or recreational facility where there are weights or exercise equipment and in exercise and fitness classes
  • Team sports must not be practiced or played except for training (no games or scrimmage)
  • Activities that are likely to result in individuals coming within 2 metres of each other are not permitted; no contact permitted for team or individual sports, with an exemption for high performance, including parasport, athletes.
  • Patrons may only be in the facility for 90 minutes except if engaging in a sport
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible; measures to prevent shouting by both instructors and members of the public
  • Face coverings required except when exercising
  • Require contact information for all members of the public that enter the facility
  • Require reservation for entry; one reservation for teams
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Meeting and event spaces

  • Maximum of 10 people per facility indoors or 25 outdoors
  • Booking multiple rooms for the same event not permitted
  • Establishments must be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 10 p.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Require contact information for all seated patrons
  • Limit of 4 people may be seated together
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Retail

  • Fitting rooms must be limited to non-adjacent stalls
  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metre distance required inside and outside; face covering also required while in line
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • For malls:
    • Maximum number of patrons permitted to be seated indoors in mall food court is 10
    • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Personal care services

  • Oxygen bars, steam rooms, saunas, bath houses and other adult venues, closed
  • Sensory deprivation pods closed (some exceptions)
  • Services requiring removal of face coverings prohibited
  • Require contact information from all patrons
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments

  • Maximum of 10 people indoors or 25 people outdoors
  • Table games are prohibited
  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 10 p.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Require contact information from all patrons
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Cinemas

  • Closed, except for:
    • drive-in cinemas
    • rehearsal or performing a recorded or broadcasted event, with restrictions:
      • Performers and employees must maintain 2 metre physical distance except for purposes of the performance
      • Singers and players of brass or wind instruments must be separated from any other performers by plexiglass or other impermeable barrier
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Performing arts facilities

  • Closed to spectators
  • Rehearsal or performing a recorded or broadcasted event permitted
    • Performers and employees must maintain 2 metre physical distance except for purposes of the performance
    • Singers and players of brass or wind instruments must be separated from any other performers by plexiglass or other impermeable barrier
  • Drive-in performances permitted
  • A safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

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Waterloo Region to remain in red (control) zone – KitchenerToday.com

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Waterloo Region will continue to stay in the red (control) zone of the province’s response framework, at least for now.

Just one new region will be moving into red on Monday, and that’s Windsor-Essex.

Waterloo Region was placed into the red zone on Monday, November 23.

Earlier this week, the region’s medical officer of health also issued a Section 22 order when it comes to malls and retail stores.

It requires them to ensure capacity is managed and actively monitored, such that adequate physical distancing can be maintained.

That order came into effect on Friday morning.

The active COVID-19 caseload in Waterloo Region is 460, the highest it has ever been.

Below are the control measures for red:

Organized public events, social gatherings and religious services, rites and ceremonies

  • Limits for all organized public events and social gatherings:
    • 5 people indoors
    • 25 people outdoors
  • Limits for religious services rites or ceremonies, including wedding services and funeral services (apply regardless of the venue where held):
    • 30% capacity of the room indoors
    • 100 people outdoors

Restaurants, bars and other food and drink establishments

  • Maximum number of patrons permitted to be seated indoors is 10
  • Outdoor dining, take out, drive through, and delivery permitted, including alcohol
  • Require patrons to be seated; 2 metre minimum or impermeable barrier required between tables
  • Limit of 4 people may be seated together
  • Outdoor dining, take out, drive through and delivery permitted
  • Dancing, singing and the live performance of music is prohibited
  • Require contact information for all seated patrons
  • No buffet style service
  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metres distance and face covering required
  • Face coverings required except when eating or drinking only
  • Personal protective equipment, including eye protection required when a worker must come within 2 metres of another person who is not wearing a face covering
  • Establishments must be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 10 p.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • Night clubs and strip clubs only permitted to operate as restaurant or bar
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Sports and recreational fitness facilities

  • Gyms and fitness studios permitted to be open with maximum of:
    • 10 people indoors or 25 people outdoors in classes; and
    • 10 people indoors in areas with weights or exercise equipment
  • No spectators permitted (exemption for parent and guardian supervision of children)
  • Increase spacing between patrons to 3 metres for areas of a sport or recreational facility where there are weights or exercise equipment and in exercise and fitness classes
  • Team sports must not be practiced or played except for training (no games or scrimmage)
  • Activities that are likely to result in individuals coming within 2 metres of each other are not permitted; no contact permitted for team or individual sports, with an exemption for high performance, including parasport, athletes.
  • Patrons may only be in the facility for 90 minutes except if engaging in a sport
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible; measures to prevent shouting by both instructors and members of the public
  • Face coverings required except when exercising
  • Require contact information for all members of the public that enter the facility
  • Require reservation for entry; one reservation for teams
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Recreational facilities and community centres in Waterloo Region (update issued Friday) 

  • Indoor capacity of 10 program participants per room/space, provided physical distancing can be maintained.
  • Outdoor capacity of 25 program participants per space, provided physical distancing can be maintained.
  • Additional coaching and training staff are permitted, limited strictly to those officially rostered with the team/athletes as identified in their provincial association’s return to play protocols, provided physical distancing can be maintained.
  • No spectators permitted. Where previously allowed, one guardian per minor aged participant is permitted. Masks for guardians are mandatory, and physical distancing must be maintained.
  • Aquatics classes are limited to 10 participants per class. If physical distancing can be maintained and total pool capacity remains below 30%, more than one class may be in the pool at a time.
  • Mandatory active screening, contact information and attendance for all patrons.
  • Drop-in recreation programs (pre-registration is required) have a maximum capacity of 10 people. 
  • For all team sport, scrimmages and games are no longer permitted.
  • Teams must adjust their programming to training and skill development only, while meeting the required maximum capacity numbers.
  • No contact permitted for team or individual sports.
  • Community centre room rentals for church, funeral or wedding services are limited to 30% of room capacity.

Meeting and event spaces

  • Maximum of 10 people per facility indoors or 25 outdoors
  • Establishments must be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 10 p.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Require contact information for all seated patrons
  • Limit of 4 people may be seated together
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Retail

  • Fitting rooms must be limited to non-adjacent stalls
  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metre distance required inside and outside; face covering also required while in line
  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • For malls:
    • Maximum number of patrons permitted to be seated indoors in mall food court is 10
    • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Personal care services

  • Oxygen bars, steam rooms, saunas, bath houses and other adult venues, closed
  • Sensory deprivation pods closed (some exceptions)
  • Require contact information from all patrons
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments

  • Maximum of 10 people indoors or 25 people outdoors
  • Table games are prohibited
  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 10 p.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Require contact information from all patrons
  • Screening of patrons is required, in accordance with instructions issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Cinemas

  • Closed, except for:
    • drive-in cinemas
    • rehearsal or performing a recorded or broadcasted event, with restrictions:
      • Performers and employees must maintain 2 metre physical distance except for purposes of the performance
      • Singers and players of brass or wind instruments must be separated from any other performers by plexiglass or other impermeable barrier
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Performing arts facilities

  • Closed to spectators
  • Rehearsal or performing a recorded or broadcasted event permitted
    • Performers and employees must maintain 2 metre physical distance except for purposes of the performance
    • Singers and players of brass or wind instruments must be separated from any other performers by plexiglass or other impermeable barrier
  • Drive-in performances permitted
  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

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Earth is 2000 light years closer to supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy than we thought – CTV News

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A new map of the Milky Way by Japanese space experts has put Earth 2,000 light years closer to the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.

This map has suggested that the center of the Milky Way, and the black hole which sits there, is located 25,800 light-years from Earth. This is closer than the official value of 27,700 light-years adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 1985, the National Observatory of Japan said.

What’s more, according to the map, our solar system is traveling at 227 kilometers per second as it orbits around the galactic center — this is faster than the official value of 220 kilometers per second, the release added.

These updated values are a result of more than 15 years of observations by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA, according to an announcement released Thursday from the National Observatory of Japan. VERA is short for VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry and refers to the mission’s array of telescopes, which use Very Long Baseline Interferometry to explore the three-dimensional structure of the Milky Way.

Because the Earth is located inside the Milky Way, it’s difficult to step back and see what the galaxy looks like. To get around this, the project used astrometry, the accurate measurement of the position and motion of objects, to understand the overall structure of the Milky Way and Earth’s place in it.

The black hole is known as Sagittarius A* or Sgr A* and is 4.2 million times more massive than our sun. The supermassive hole and its enormous gravitational field governs the orbits of stars at the center of the Milky Way. Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez earned the 2020 Nobel prize for physics for its discovery. There are several types of black holes, and scientists believe the supermassive ones may be connected to the formation of galaxies, as they often exist at the center of the massive star systems — but it’s still not clear exactly how, or which form first.

MORE PRECISE APPROACH

In August, VERA published its first catalog, containing data for 99 celestial objects. Based on this catalog and recent observations by other groups, astronomers constructed a position and velocity map. From this map, the scientists were able to calculate the center of the galaxy, the point that everything revolves around.

VERA combines data from four radio telescopes across Japan. The observatory said that, when combined, the telescopes were able to achieve a resolution that in theory would allow the astronomers to spot a United States penny placed on the surface of the Moon.

To be clear, the changes don’t mean Earth is plunging toward the black hole, the observatory said. Rather, the map more accurately identifies where the solar system has been all along.

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