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L'Oreal to drop words white, fair, light from skincare range – Deccan Herald

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French cosmetics major L’Oreal Group on Friday said it will drop words such as white, fair and light from all its skincare products, a day after Unilever announced a similar move.

Cosmetics brands have been under the scanner over products that promote skin fairness amid growing voices against racial stereotyping. This has intensified in the wake of the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement in the West.

“The L’Oreal Group acknowledges the legitimate concerns about the terms used to describe skin even-ing products, and has therefore decided to remove the words white/whitening, fair/fairness, light/lightening from all its skin even-ing products,” the company said in a statement.

L’Oreal is a big player in the personal care categoty and owns global brands like Garnier, L’Oreal Paris, Maybelline New York and NYX Professional Make Up.

FMCG major Unilever had on Thursday said it is withdrawing the word ‘Fair’ from its popular skincare brand ‘Fair & Lovely’.

Several companies have been forced to reassess their products and branding following the ‘Black Lives Matter’ protests across the globe.

Recently, US-based healthcare and FMCG giant Johnson & Johnson (J&J) stopped the sale of its skin-whitening creams globally, including in India.

Kolkata-based FMCG firm Emami, which owns fairness cream brand Fair & Handsome, had said it is evaluating the current situation.

“We, as responsible corporate citizens value consumer sentiments and take cognizance of the holistic approach that is required to be taken to address their needs.   

“We are studying all implications currently and evaluating internally to decide our next course of action,” an Emami spokesperson had said.

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Air Canada orders first batch of 25,000 rapid COVID-19 testing kits – CBC.ca

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Air Canada has ordered 25,000 testing kits that can detect COVID-19 in someone in as little as five minutes, a key hurdle for an industry that’s desperately trying to make it safe and possible for travellers to fly again.

The first batch of tests will be for employee volunteers, now that the devices by Abbott Laboratories have been approved for use in Canada by federal health and safety authorities, the airline said Thursday.

Current tests have to be administered at testing centres, which have been plagued by long lineups, and results can take days.

The new test is faster and requires a nasal or throat specimen to be collected from a patient on a swab and inserted into an analyzer to detect the presence of the virus. Positive results come back in as little as five minutes. Negative results can take about 13 minutes to verify.

The airline is moving ahead with the plan after a testing phase when it partnered with McMaster University and the Greater Toronto Airports Authority to test arriving international travellers at Toronto’s Pearson airport.

“Preliminary results from the study indicate testing can help protect customers and facilitate the safe relaxation of government travel restrictions,” Air Canada said.

More than 13,000 tests

Since the experiment began on Sept. 3, more than 13,000 travellers have been tested.

More than 99 per cent of the tests came back negative. Of the less than one per cent that came back positive, more than 80 per cent were identified on the initial test, while the rest were detected with a followup test seven days later.

“We believe testing will be key to protecting employees and customers until such time as a COVID-19 vaccine is available,” said Air Canada’s chief medical officer, Dr. Jim Chung. 

“Rapid testing is also a means to enable governments to relax current blanket travel restrictions and quarantines in a measured way while still safeguarding the health and safety of the public.”

Airlines have been hit harder than many other industries, as fears of the virus have walloped demand for travel, and border restrictions have limited the number of flights that airlines are even allowed to offer.

Unions demand help for sector

The airline hopes that the testing kits will help convince Transport Canada to relax current rules that stipulate all international travellers must self-isolate for 14 days upon landing, an onerous stipulation that the industry says makes people not want to fly.

The testing news also comes as unions representing more than 300,000 aviation workers say more government help is needed for the hard-hit sector.

At a press conference in a Toronto hotel on Thursday, Unifor president Jerry Dias said the industry needs a $7 billion injection from the government and access to low-interest loans urgently, “or there won’t be Canadian airlines, and that will cost us all much more.”

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We're #25! Industrials power modest Q3 gain for the TSX – BNN

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The S&P/TSX Composite Index rose 3.91 per cent in the third quarter, with gains moderating after a blowout Q2 as equity markets digested the shocks from the COVID-19 pandemic, prospects for continued economic shutdowns and the impact of lower-for-longer interest rates.

Those gains have the Toronto benchmark ranked 25th out of 92 global peers, sandwiched between Romania’s Bucharest BET Index and Germany’s DAX Index, and comfortably lagging the performance of the U.S. broad-market S&P 500 and the blue-chip Dow Jones Industrial Average.

In all, nine of the 11 TSX subgroups were in positive territory for the quarter, indicating a degree of breadth to the gains.

Below, BNN Bloomberg takes a look at the TSX leaders and laggards for the quarter that was.

Sector leaders:

Industrials: +13.22 per cent

Utilities: +9.88 per cent

Materials: +8.76 per cent

Industrials led the way for the TSX, as investors looked to parse the impact on Canada’s economic reopening on the nation’s transport, construction and equipment makers. Utilities, which typically perform well in a low-rate environment due to their need to borrow capital to fund expansions and have a habit of paying steady dividends, took second spot with a nearly 10 per cent gain. The materials subgroup took third sport with a nearly nine per cent gain, with gold prices holding near a multi-year high due to global economic uncertainty. But it wasn’t just the precious metal that helped the subgroup, with some strength in copper lifting base metals producers amid speculation Chinese industrial activity was beginning to recover from the pandemic-induced demand destruction.

Lead gainers:

Trillium Therapeutics Inc.: +72.45 per cent

Pretium Resources: +50.00 per cent

Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers: +42.88 per cent

Trillium Therapeutics:

Trillium hasn’t just been a standout performer in the third quarter, it’s been the top performer on the TSX Composite Index so far this year, rising more than 1,000 per cent. The company, which develops cancer treatments for conditions including lymphoma, has seen encouraging results for some of it’s treatments, buoying investor enthusiasm. Trillium’s efforts haven’t gone unnoticed by some of the heavy hitters in the pharma industry, with Pfizer Inc. taking a US$25 million equity stake in the firm during the quarter. Trillium also raised $150 million in Q3 through a share offering.

Pretium Resources:

The rising price of gold lifted all boats, but none more than single-mine operator Pretium. The company, which operates its Brucejack mine in north-west British Columbia, surged past analyst expectations in its most recent quarter. The rising price of bullion prompted Pretium to raise its full-year free cash flow expectations, based on an average gold price of US$1,800 per ounce. However, Pretium also warned that COVID-19 measures would raise costs as it looks to protect its workers and operations from the ravages of the virus. Pretium’s Brucejack mine is a sprawling claim with difficult geological hurdles and is seen as a potential acquisition target, with Barrick Gold Chief Executive Officer Mark Bristow having been reluctant to say the mining giant wouldn’t take a look at a potential tie-up.

Ritchie Bros Auctioneers:

Canada’s preeminent dealer of used industrial, farming and construction equipment has thus far weathered the pandemic-induced slowdown. Net income decreased a paltry two per cent in the company’s most recent quarter, even in the face of lockdowns and a drop in overall economic activity. There is, however, a degree of counter-cyclicality to Ritchie Bros results. As a middleman for the sale of second-hand equipment, the firm often benefits from customers seeking out deals on the second-hand market rather than shelling out for brand new equipment.

Sector laggards:

Health care: -14.44 per cent

Energy: -9.39 per cent

Communications services: +0.79 per cent

Trillium’s outsized gains weren’t enough to spare the health care sector from posting the weakest performance of the composite’s 11 subgroups in the quarter. Health care was hammered by some noticeable weakness in the cannabis sector as pot stocks continue to be punished for rocky performances. Energy’s rough ride continued, albeit with a disconnect from underlying energy prices. While individual stocks have been under pressure, crude oil prices have largely been in a holding pattern, with North American benchmark West Texas Intermediate hovering around US$40 per barrel as investors assess how the pandemic and subsequent economic reopenings impact the demand picture. Communications services has seen a bit of a mixed bag through the quarter, as Canada’s Big Three telcos spar with new entrants over wholesale network access rates and Cogeco battles a takeover offer from Altice USA and Roger Communications, which muddies the picture when it comes to overall performance.

Lead laggards:

Aurora Cannabis Inc: -63.07 per cent

Vermilion Energy Inc: -48.51 per cent

Enerplus Corp: -36.13 per cent

Aurora Cannabis:

Aurora’s stock has been demolished amid persistent cannabis oversupply concerns. Shares in the company plunged more than 25 per cent in one trading session alone after the company disappointed investors with its fourth-quarter results as growing pains persist in the cannabis market. The firm was also chastised by MKM Partners, with their analyst calling on Aurora to stop growing so much cannabis as the market remains out of balance with consumer demand. The company says it expects to reach positive EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) by the second quarter of 2021, about 18 months later than earlier projected.

Vermilion Energy:

The geographically-diversified energy company, which operates not only in North American but also off the coast of Ireland and France, has seen its share price swing with the vagaries of international energy markets. Fund flows from operations, a key metric in the energy sector, plunged 52 per cent in the company’s most recent quarter as concerns over global energy demand mounted. Vermilion has also been hampered by price impacts from internal squabbling over production quotas for OPEC members and suspended its dividend in April.

Enerplus:

The energy price pressures also took a toll on Enerplus in the third quarter. The company, which operates in Western Canada, North Dakota, Montana and Pennsylvania, posted a 13 per cent decline year-over-year in its most recent quarter, reflecting a troubled picture for overall consumer demand. Enerplus also booked significant impairment charges in the quarter, further hampering results.
 

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New COVID-19 outbreak at Vancouver care home where 13 died – Global News

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Ten people have contracted COVID-19 at a long-term care home in downtown Vancouver that was the site of one of B.C.’s worst outbreaks of the disease last spring.

Vancouver Coastal Health declared a new outbreak in the special care unit of Haro Park Centre on Tuesday.

Read more:
B.C. election: NDP vows to end shared rooms in long-term care, bring in for-profit home rules

On Wednesday, the care home said one person who tested positive was in hospital, while nine others were being isolated on site.

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Haro Park Centre CEO Robert Gillis said early indications are that an asymptomatic family member of a resident brought the virus into the facility.

Gillis said the home was notified about the case on Sept. 27 and isolated the resident, but that it had already been several days since the visit.

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Nine of the 10 new cases were asymptomatic, he said.

Read more:
11 new COVID-19 cases in B.C. and no new deaths, Haro Park Centre outbreak declared over

During the facility’s first outbreak, 89 people contracted COVID-19 and 13 patients died.

That outbreak was declared over on May 30.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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