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Lou-ann Neel wins the Fulmer Award in First Nations Art – Victoria News – Victoria News

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Lou-ann Neel has been making art since high school, creating textiles, carving wood, engraving jewelry, painting and eventually getting into digital illustrations. She has a fine art degree from Emily Carr, and sells her designs online.

But it took receiving the Fulmer Award in Indigenous Art this November for Neel to see herself as an artist.

“I just didn’t think anything I did was anything special because I’ve been surrounded by artists my whole life, and my whole thing was, I want to be as good as them. I’ve never seen myself so much as an artist,” she said.

Her family is rich with artistic talent — Charlie James, Mungo Martin, Ellen Neel and Kevin Cranmer, to name a few.

“When I was learning to design, that’s when I realized it’s not just a great privilege to learn but it’s kind of a family obligation to continue our own family tradition.”

Art is something she’s compelled to do, but she never considered it a career – just a full-time passion outside of her day jobs in public administration, and currently as a curator for the Royal B.C. Museum. But receiving this award, along with five other Indigenous artists in B.C. — Cole Speck (also from Alert Bay), Jaalen Edenshaw, Kelly Robinson, Nathan Wilson and Evelyn Vanderhoop — caused Neel to take a second look at her own body of work.

Neel was born in Alert Bay, and returns as often as she can to participate in ceremonies and potlatches, spend time with family, and get in time on the land and sea.

Her art education began in high school where she was taught Kwakiutl art in an immersive Indigenous art, social studies and language program. Though living in Victoria by then, she was learning Kwak’wala language and being mentored by artists like George Hunt Jr., her brother Kevin Cranmer.

She pursued a career in public administration, but kept making art on the side, becoming a full-fledged as a multi-disciplinary artist in textiles, silversmithing, painting and carving.

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In 2011, she discovered a laser engraving technique for jewelry. Other traditional artists scoffed at the laser work, but for Neel, whose enthusiasm for carving earned her carpal tunnel syndrome that stopped her from engraving, the laser was a natural adoption of technology.

“I’m still the one making the design, I’m just not hand-cutting each piece because I physically can’t. But that shouldn’t stop me from being able to create the kind of jewelry I’d love to put out there.”

She went to Emily Carr around that time, graduating four years later with a degree in fine arts focused on digital graphic design. It was while researching for a project that Neel learned about her grandmother, Ellen Neel, an artistic legend in Vancouver.

A rare female totem pole carver — she was one of a group who gave the UBC Thunderbirds their name by gifting a thunderbird totem in 1948 — Ellen was also among the first to put designs on everyday things like clothes and in architecture in the 1940s and ’50s.

A quick scroll through Neel’s online stores shows her design printed on all manner of things, from tote bags to chairs to classic art prints to silk neckties.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: First Nations carver making all the right cuts

READ MORE on Lou-ann Neel’s day job: Indigenous repatriation projects get new funding from BC government

Neel will often take her laptop to a beach with wifi access and work on digital designs, inspired by the landscape.

The winter weather has pushed her back inside to experiment with old-fashioned paint on canvas. True to her artist’s spirit, she’s come up with a new project of creating abstract paintings about how it feels to be in the big house. She wants to communicate the sense of life and fullness that comes from ceremonies and potlatches.

“I don’t care if I get locked up for the next four months here. I have all my supplies and goals that I’ve set for myself for oil painting.”

The B.C. Achievement Foundation recognizes accomplishments of British Columbians in community work, business, and art. It was founded in 2003. The Vancouver-based Fulmer Foundation is the title sponsor of the award.

Do you have something to add to this story or something else we should report on? Email: zoe.ducklow@blackpress.ca


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Supernatural Treasures. (Lou-ann Neel)

Supernatural Treasures. (Lou-ann Neel)

A sample of some of Lou-ann Neel’s jewelry.

A sample of some of Lou-ann Neel’s jewelry.

Westcoast Storm. (Lou-ann Neel)

Westcoast Storm. (Lou-ann Neel)

Missing You, My Sister. (Lou-ann Neel)

Missing You, My Sister. (Lou-ann Neel)

Balance. (Lou-ann Neel)

Balance. (Lou-ann Neel)

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Stephenville's Jesse Renouf finds a story behind the art – SaltWire Network

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Jesse Renouf, 23, has found a way to channel his creative energies and make a living for himself.

His art store, Treasures by Jesse, first opened in Stephenville in June 2017.

Run by Jesse and his family, the store offers a wide array of Jesse’s art, including pebble art, paintings, painted mailboxes, tissue boxes, and more.

While Jesse always had an interest in art, his passion was piqued while completing the Film and Video Production program at the College of the North Atlantic just three years ago.

“Within Film and Video, there was an art course and he loved it,” said Jesse’s mother Judy.

Jesse Renouf proudly shows off one of the walls of art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

The family was able to draw on Jesse’s newfound passion to open Treasures by Jesse once he completed the program later the same year.

“We started Googling ideas and that’s where he started with the basic pebble, and then started trying more challenging pieces,” said Judy. “Three years later, here we are.”

The store also provides Jesse, who has autism, an opportunity to socialize – he gets to interact with customers and engage in conversation.

In fact, he has a table set up at the store and often lets visitors watch him paint to give them a sense of the process.

“It gives customers an idea what the story is all about when it comes to painting,” he said.

When he sells a painting, it makes him feel appreciated.

“I feel very proud when someone comes in and buys my artwork and they’re happy,” he said.

Jesse speaks passionately about his work. He is always able to find a story behind the art.

For example, he talks imaginatively of how a painting of a clothesline evokes familiarity to any Newfoundlander.

“It gives customers attention to a type of chore that can be done on a beautiful day outside,” he said. “Hanging the laundry, drying over time. There’s the grass, the waves, the wind blowing the clothes in a breeze. It’s a very beautiful type of day outside, you can tell in this type of pebble artwork.”

Other paintings depict Newfoundland touchstones, including mummers, jellybean row, fishing boats and lighthouses – in each case, Jesse perceives the history behind the object.

He also loves to paint beloved cartoon characters such as Elmo, Spongebob Squarepants, and Homer Simpson.

Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED - Contributed
Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

Teamwork

Treasures by Jesse is run as a team, with the assistance of Jesse’s mom Judy, his dad Wayne, and his co-worker Trudie Jesso.

“We are working together to make my business stronger,” said Jesse.

The first step is buying the canvasses. Jesse does all the painting on these.

For the pebble art, Jesse and Trudie work together to construct the painting and piece the materials – including pebbles, sea glass, and driftwood – together.

According to Jesse, it’s like putting together a jigsaw puzzle.

The paintings are left to dry and then Judy is tasked with coating the paintings.

Meanwhile, Wayne does all the woodworking.

The pebbles, sea glass and driftwood used in Jesse’s art is collected along the beaches.

Cleaning and sanitizing these materials is part of the process.

Local residents also donate materials. Judy felt this was indicative of the type of support Jesse gets from the community.

“People do support him,” she said.

Treasures by Jesse is open year-round.

Art can be purchased in-person at the store, located at 143 Main St. in Stephenville, or ordered for shipping online.

To learn more about Treasures by Jesse, visit www.treasuresbyjesse.com


Behind the Business is a regular feature that introduces you to local businesspeople. Want to suggest someone that should be featured? Email your idea to [email protected]

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Stephenville's Jesse Renouf finds a story behind the art – The Journal Pioneer

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Jesse Renouf, 23, has found a way to channel his creative energies and make a living for himself.

His art store, Treasures by Jesse, first opened in Stephenville in June 2017.

Run by Jesse and his family, the store offers a wide array of Jesse’s art, including pebble art, paintings, painted mailboxes, tissue boxes, and more.

While Jesse always had an interest in art, his passion was piqued while completing the Film and Video Production program at the College of the North Atlantic just three years ago.

“Within Film and Video, there was an art course and he loved it,” said Jesse’s mother Judy.

Jesse Renouf proudly shows off one of the walls of art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

The family was able to draw on Jesse’s newfound passion to open Treasures by Jesse once he completed the program later the same year.

“We started Googling ideas and that’s where he started with the basic pebble, and then started trying more challenging pieces,” said Judy. “Three years later, here we are.”

The store also provides Jesse, who has autism, an opportunity to socialize – he gets to interact with customers and engage in conversation.

In fact, he has a table set up at the store and often lets visitors watch him paint to give them a sense of the process.

“It gives customers an idea what the story is all about when it comes to painting,” he said.

When he sells a painting, it makes him feel appreciated.

“I feel very proud when someone comes in and buys my artwork and they’re happy,” he said.

Jesse speaks passionately about his work. He is always able to find a story behind the art.

For example, he talks imaginatively of how a painting of a clothesline evokes familiarity to any Newfoundlander.

“It gives customers attention to a type of chore that can be done on a beautiful day outside,” he said. “Hanging the laundry, drying over time. There’s the grass, the waves, the wind blowing the clothes in a breeze. It’s a very beautiful type of day outside, you can tell in this type of pebble artwork.”

Other paintings depict Newfoundland touchstones, including mummers, jellybean row, fishing boats and lighthouses – in each case, Jesse perceives the history behind the object.

He also loves to paint beloved cartoon characters such as Elmo, Spongebob Squarepants, and Homer Simpson.

Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED - Contributed
Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

Teamwork

Treasures by Jesse is run as a team, with the assistance of Jesse’s mom Judy, his dad Wayne, and his co-worker Trudie Jesso.

“We are working together to make my business stronger,” said Jesse.

The first step is buying the canvasses. Jesse does all the painting on these.

For the pebble art, Jesse and Trudie work together to construct the painting and piece the materials – including pebbles, sea glass, and driftwood – together.

According to Jesse, it’s like putting together a jigsaw puzzle.

The paintings are left to dry and then Judy is tasked with coating the paintings.

Meanwhile, Wayne does all the woodworking.

The pebbles, sea glass and driftwood used in Jesse’s art is collected along the beaches.

Cleaning and sanitizing these materials is part of the process.

Local residents also donate materials. Judy felt this was indicative of the type of support Jesse gets from the community.

“People do support him,” she said.

Treasures by Jesse is open year-round.

Art can be purchased in-person at the store, located at 143 Main St. in Stephenville, or ordered for shipping online.

To learn more about Treasures by Jesse, visit www.treasuresbyjesse.com


Behind the Business is a regular feature that introduces you to local businesspeople. Want to suggest someone that should be featured? Email your idea to [email protected]

RELATED:

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Stephenville’s Jesse Renouf finds a story behind the art

Published

 on

Jesse Renouf, 23, has found a way to channel his creative energies and make a living for himself.

His art store, Treasures by Jesse, first opened in Stephenville in June 2017.

Run by Jesse and his family, the store offers a wide array of Jesse’s art, including pebble art, paintings, painted mailboxes, tissue boxes, and more.

While Jesse always had an interest in art, his passion was piqued while completing the Film and Video Production program at the College of the North Atlantic just three years ago.

“Within Film and Video, there was an art course and he loved it,” said Jesse’s mother Judy.

Jesse Renouf proudly shows off one of the walls of art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

The family was able to draw on Jesse’s newfound passion to open Treasures by Jesse once he completed the program later the same year.

“We started Googling ideas and that’s where he started with the basic pebble, and then started trying more challenging pieces,” said Judy. “Three years later, here we are.”

The store also provides Jesse, who has autism, an opportunity to socialize – he gets to interact with customers and engage in conversation.

In fact, he has a table set up at the store and often lets visitors watch him paint to give them a sense of the process.

“It gives customers an idea what the story is all about when it comes to painting,” he said.

When he sells a painting, it makes him feel appreciated.

“I feel very proud when someone comes in and buys my artwork and they’re happy,” he said.

Jesse speaks passionately about his work. He is always able to find a story behind the art.

For example, he talks imaginatively of how a painting of a clothesline evokes familiarity to any Newfoundlander.

“It gives customers attention to a type of chore that can be done on a beautiful day outside,” he said. “Hanging the laundry, drying over time. There’s the grass, the waves, the wind blowing the clothes in a breeze. It’s a very beautiful type of day outside, you can tell in this type of pebble artwork.”

Other paintings depict Newfoundland touchstones, including mummers, jellybean row, fishing boats and lighthouses – in each case, Jesse perceives the history behind the object.

He also loves to paint beloved cartoon characters such as Elmo, Spongebob Squarepants, and Homer Simpson.

Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED - Contributed
Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

Teamwork

Treasures by Jesse is run as a team, with the assistance of Jesse’s mom Judy, his dad Wayne, and his co-worker Trudie Jesso.

“We are working together to make my business stronger,” said Jesse.

The first step is buying the canvasses. Jesse does all the painting on these.

For the pebble art, Jesse and Trudie work together to construct the painting and piece the materials – including pebbles, sea glass, and driftwood – together.

According to Jesse, it’s like putting together a jigsaw puzzle.

The paintings are left to dry and then Judy is tasked with coating the paintings.

Meanwhile, Wayne does all the woodworking.

The pebbles, sea glass and driftwood used in Jesse’s art is collected along the beaches.

Cleaning and sanitizing these materials is part of the process.

Local residents also donate materials. Judy felt this was indicative of the type of support Jesse gets from the community.

“People do support him,” she said.

Treasures by Jesse is open year-round.

Art can be purchased in-person at the store, located at 143 Main St. in Stephenville, or ordered for shipping online.

To learn more about Treasures by Jesse, visit www.treasuresbyjesse.com


Behind the Business is a regular feature that introduces you to local businesspeople. Want to suggest someone that should be featured? Email your idea to [email protected]

 

Source:- TheChronicleHerald.ca

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