Connect with us

Real eState

These are Burnaby's biggest real estate bargains right now – Burnaby Now

Published

 on


A real estate bargain in Burnaby isn’t always just about how low the price is.

In this mid-month roundup of Burnaby’s bargain listings by roomvu, these are listed well below government assessed value, are under $1 million, and fresh on the market.

article continues below

It’s the cream of the crop of home deals.

How it works is the B.C. government analyzes and gives a price based on each property’s factors like size, layout, shape, age, neighbourhood, the condition of the property and more.

When listing prices appear lower than as compared to government value, these incredible value-for-money homes set off alarm bells, demanding to be seen and bought.

The first one on the list, for example, is listed at 20% below assessed value.

So here the bargains listed between Nov. 1-17 in Burnaby:

This is a 2 bedrooms, 2 bathroom Condo is listed for sale by agent Victor Beiof Royal Pacific Realty (Kingsway) Ltd. . They are asking $629900 while the assessed value for this property is $789000 .

This property features:

Fulton House By Polygon is located in a quiet area of Brentwood in North Burnaby but near the Brand-new Brentwood town center and sky train station. This south facing unit has plenty of light, great floor plan that includes 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms area side from each other. Custom cabinetry, 5 burner gas cook top, as well as gas stove, A convenient island in the gourmet kitchen. The larger balcony with panoramic view all the way to the Metrotown is also a plus. The Fulton Club features a 28000 sqft fitness area, yoga studio, outdoor pool, hot tub, sauna, lough, BBQ and more. It has everything you wish for, come check it out. Price to sell.

This is a 2 bedrooms, 2 bathroom Condo is listed for sale by agent Zoe Yuan PREC*of Pacific Evergreen Realty Ltd. . They are asking $899000 while the assessed value for this property is $1008000 .

This property features:

luxurious high-rise living built by polygon in Metrotown centre location. two bedroom plus den with two full bathroom and two big balconies corner unit has perfect 270 degree views as mountain, city and lake.

This is a 2 bedrooms, 2 bathroom Condo is listed for sale by agent Nancy Wei PREC*of Royal Pacific Realty Corp. They are asking $845900 while the assessed value for this property is $914000 .

This property features:

Fulton House by Polygon in Brentwood Mall area, Southeast facing corner unit features 2 bedrooms,2bathrooms with gorgeous view. High ceilings in living areas. Gourmet kitchens features gleaming engineered stone countertops, S/S appliances and a functional central island. Enjoy a resort-inspired swimming pool and hot tub, Steps to restaurants, shoppings, theatre and more. A few minutes walk to skytrain station. Bright corner unit with unobstructed views east from one patio and south from the other patio. City view- Brentwood and Metrotown; Mountain view- SFU and Mt. Baker. Large parking spot by the elevator Upgraded closets 1 locker; Large storage.

9 4033 DOMINION STREET: $749K (7% below assessed value)

This is a 2 bedrooms, 3 bathroom Condo is listed for sale by agent Frederick Moyof Sutton Centre Realty . They are asking $749900 while the assessed value for this property is $809000 .

This property features:

Welcome to Parkview townhouse development located in the popular yet private Burnaby Hospital/Cascade heights location. Situated next to Broadview Park at the end of the cul de sac, Parkview is for those who enjoy their privacy yet still have the amenities, elementary & high schools all close to home. 18 strata titled homes in a 1 & 2 level configuration, 9′ ceilings in the main living area, SS appliance package, private H/W tank, R/I alarm system, electric fire place and a lively bright decor that highlights the entire home. This incredibly well laid out 2 level home is townhouse living at its finest & facing quiet Dominion St. Ready to move in today and available for showings at any time with reasonable notice.

This is a 1 bedrooms, 1 bathroom Condo is listed for sale by agent Diana Amorosoof Sutton Group-West Coast Realty. They are asking $488800 while the assessed value for this property is $511000.

This property features:

Look no further, prestigious SILHOUETTE. Perfectly nestled between Burnaby and the Coquitlam border. Close to transit including Skytrain, shopping, golf course, restaurants and much more. This is the perfect unit from the stunning180* views that can be enjoyed from the lovely west facing balcony to the open concept layout with kitchen and breakfast island overlooking large dining and living room. Bedroom is spacious and offers slider doors to balcony and cheater ensuite. Unit offers one parking and one storage locker. Amenities include; gym, club house, caretaker and a guest suite. Contact Listing Agent for more information. Open House Nov 8th 1:00pm to 2:00pm.

 

 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Real eState

Booming real estate market reaches rural N.S. – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Realtors in rural Nova Scotia are adjusting quickly to a new way of selling houses as buyers from places like Ontario and B.C. snap up properties without seeing them in person.

Christopher Snarby, the co-owner of Exit Realty Inter Lake, sells properties from Chester to Queens County and estimates he’s sold 12-15 of them sight unseen since May.

“People have been desperate and they can’t get here to see it, and they know things are moving quickly so they just kind of have to make a choice,” Snarby told CBC’s Information Morning on Monday.

“And not everybody’s comfortable with it, but certainly I’ve had a number that have been.”

He admits selling a property virtually can be a challenge. 

“It’s hard to describe a smell or feel of a house, but it really does become our responsibility to try to convey as much information as we can,” Snarby said. 

October was a record-breaking month for property sales across the province with inventory low and prices continuing to soar, according to the Nova Scotia Association of Realtors.

Bobbi Maxwell said half of her buyers right now are from outside the province and won’t see their houses in person until they arrive. Most are middle-aged people who can work from home and are looking for a place to retire at some point.

“We’re starting to see more people … migrate this way because they want the solitude, the peace, the quiet, the safety and the beauty of the beaches,” said Maxwell, a realtor with Viewpoint Realty Services who sells properties around Barrington and Clyde River in Shelburne County.

“We’re not as hot as the metro [market], but it’s definitely been one crazy market for us as well.” 

Record October across N.S.

The Nova Scotia Association of Realtors compiled data for the month of October that shows 1,427 units were sold across the province, up more than 30 per cent from October 2019.

The average sale price was a record $304,590, rising just over 21 per cent from the previous October. 

In Yarmouth, there were 24 residential sales in October, up 41 per cent from last year and in the Annapolis Valley, 203 properties were sold, up 30 per cent since last October. The average sale price also went up in both areas last month. 

Christopher Snarby, co-owner Exit Realty Interlake, said people are moving to communities on the South Shore for the relative affordability, friendliness and proximity to the ocean. (Robert Short/CBC)

On the South Shore where Snarby works, sales in October were up about 30 per cent from last year and the average residential price was just over $291,000, an increase of 36 per cent over last October. 

The booming market is a major win for sellers but can be frustrating for buyers

“We’re not usually accustomed to that many bidding wars in our area, but now … most properties have gone into at least two or three offers and the time frames are a lot quicker as well,” Snarby said.

In the past, houses would sit on the market for six months to a year and now they’re gone in weeks or days, he added.

Rural internet still a challenge

Even though people are eager to move to Nova Scotia for its friendliness and relative affordability, Snarby and Maxwell said they are routinely asked about internet service.

“It’s really funny because people are more concerned about the internet than they are health-care services,” Maxwell said.

She said newcomers are good news for rural areas like Shelburne County that have struggled with out-migration. 

Bobbi Maxwell hopes the tide is turning for communities like Shelburne, which have seen an out-migration of residents in recent years. (Robert Short/CBC)

But she said there could be challenges, too. 

Many new buyers say they eventually want to build their own homes but finding skilled labour in the area isn’t always easy, she said. 

“I think we’re going to have a lot of growing pains because with the demand, we’re very short on tradesmen like plumbers and electricians and carpenters,” Maxwell said.

“I really am hoping that a lot of the people who are moving here from away are bringing in new skills or new motivation to want to … become career oriented or focused and become tradesmen in our area.”

Snarby said some of his clients are selling homes in the $800,000 range in Ontario and buying a property in rural Nova Scotia for around $200,000, leaving a healthy amount for their retirement fund.

 “And at the end of the day, if they’re not comfortable with their house or if it’s not quite the right one, they can put it back on the market and there’s a good chance it’ll sell,” Snarby said. 

MORE TOP STORIES

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Real eState

Pandemic-induced demand for more space pushing up cottage prices, real estate firm says – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Home prices are increasing in Canada’s cottage country as more buyers look to move there full-time, according to a report released Monday by Royal LePage.

Prices of single-family recreational homes rose 11.5 per cent to an aggregate of $453,046 in the first nine months of the year, the real estate brokerage said.

The data from Royal LePage comes amid an overall uptick in home prices this year, after COVID-19 lockdowns stymied the spring buying season.

A rush of demand and a limited supply as the economy reopened this summer and fall meant that home prices were up 15.2 per cent last month in Canada compared to a year ago, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association.

Royal LePage chief executive Phil Soper says the number of cottages, cabins, chalets and farmhouses on the market have also dwindled amid the increased demand, at least through September.

“Inventory levels are the lowest I’ve seen in 15 years,” said Heather FitzGerald, a Royal LePage agent in Moncton, NB, in the report.

While local buyers have moved away from cities and closer to nature, FitzGerald also noted an increase in buyers from Ontario and Quebec.

Corey Huskilson, another Royal LePage agent quoted in the report and based in Halifax, said buyers from outside of the Maritimes, “who expect to be working remotely for the foreseeable future, are flocking to the area.”

Real estate agents in 54 per cent of regions told the brokerage that there was a significant increase in buyers looking to work remotely at a cottage as a primary residence.

Eric Leger, a Laurentians-based agent, said in the report that Quebec’s lockdown periods “sparked an urgent desire for many city dwellers, in need of more living space, to relocate to the suburbs and cottage country.”

Retirees a factor, too

Agents in other provinces noted similar trends, with one agent noting that Alberta-based buyers are competing with people across the country for properties in Canmore.

“Highway developments have reduced the drive from Saskatoon to 1.5 hours, which makes working remotely more possible for those who still have to go into the office a few days a week,” said broker Lou Doderai in the report.

The report says retirees have also bid up cottage prices, with agents in 68 per cent of regions saying more retirees are buying cottages this year compared to last year.

“Retiring baby boomers have been putting upward pressure on prices and reducing inventory for the last few years. Retirees are now finding themselves competing against remote workers,” said Bob Clarke, an agent in Ontario’s Muskoka region, in the report.

“The most common question used to be ‘is the property West-facing?’ Now my clients’ biggest concern is internet quality.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Real eState

Booming real estate market reaches rural N.S. – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Realtors in rural Nova Scotia are adjusting quickly to a new way of selling houses as buyers from places like Ontario and B.C. snap up properties without seeing them in person.

Christopher Snarby, the co-owner of Exit Realty Inter Lake, sells properties from Chester to Queens County and estimates he’s sold 12-15 of them sight unseen since May.

“People have been desperate and they can’t get here to see it, and they know things are moving quickly so they just kind of have to make a choice,” Snarby told CBC’s Information Morning on Monday.

“And not everybody’s comfortable with it, but certainly I’ve had a number that have been.”

He admits selling a property virtually can be a challenge. 

“It’s hard to describe a smell or feel of a house, but it really does become our responsibility to try to convey as much information as we can,” Snarby said. 

October was a record-breaking month for property sales across the province with inventory low and prices continuing to soar, according to the Nova Scotia Association of Realtors.

Bobbi Maxwell said half of her buyers right now are from outside the province and won’t see their houses in person until they arrive. Most are middle-aged people who can work from home and are looking for a place to retire at some point.

“We’re starting to see more people … migrate this way because they want the solitude, the peace, the quiet, the safety and the beauty of the beaches,” said Maxwell, a realtor with Viewpoint Realty Services who sells properties around Barrington and Clyde River in Shelburne County.

“We’re not as hot as the metro [market], but it’s definitely been one crazy market for us as well.” 

Record October across N.S.

The Nova Scotia Association of Realtors compiled data for the month of October that shows 1,427 units were sold across the province, up more than 30 per cent from October 2019.

The average sale price was a record $304,590, rising just over 21 per cent from the previous October. 

In Yarmouth, there were 24 residential sales in October, up 41 per cent from last year and in the Annapolis Valley, 203 properties were sold, up 30 per cent since last October. The average sale price also went up in both areas last month. 

Christopher Snarby, co-owner Exit Realty Interlake, said people are moving to communities on the South Shore for the relative affordability, friendliness and proximity to the ocean. (Robert Short/CBC)

On the South Shore where Snarby works, sales in October were up about 30 per cent from last year and the average residential price was just over $291,000, an increase of 36 per cent over last October. 

The booming market is a major win for sellers but can be frustrating for buyers

“We’re not usually accustomed to that many bidding wars in our area, but now … most properties have gone into at least two or three offers and the time frames are a lot quicker as well,” Snarby said.

In the past, houses would sit on the market for six months to a year and now they’re gone in weeks or days, he added.

Rural internet still a challenge

Even though people are eager to move to Nova Scotia for its friendliness and relative affordability, Snarby and Maxwell said they are routinely asked about internet service.

“It’s really funny because people are more concerned about the internet than they are health-care services,” Maxwell said.

She said newcomers are good news for rural areas like Shelburne County that have struggled with out-migration. 

Bobbi Maxwell hopes the tide is turning for communities like Shelburne, which have seen an out-migration of residents in recent years. (Robert Short/CBC)

But she said there could be challenges, too. 

Many new buyers say they eventually want to build their own homes but finding skilled labour in the area isn’t always easy, she said. 

“I think we’re going to have a lot of growing pains because with the demand, we’re very short on tradesmen like plumbers and electricians and carpenters,” Maxwell said.

“I really am hoping that a lot of the people who are moving here from away are bringing in new skills or new motivation to want to … become career oriented or focused and become tradesmen in our area.”

Snarby said some of his clients are selling homes in the $800,000 range in Ontario and buying a property in rural Nova Scotia for around $200,000, leaving a healthy amount for their retirement fund.

 “And at the end of the day, if they’re not comfortable with their house or if it’s not quite the right one, they can put it back on the market and there’s a good chance it’ll sell,” Snarby said. 

MORE TOP STORIES

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending