Connect with us

Sports

Manitoba looks at starting Phase 4 reopening amid coronavirus as early as July 25 – Global News

Published

 on


Manitoba’s premier says the province is looking at moving into the next phase of reopening amid COVID-19 — including increasing gathering sizes, opening casinos to half-capacity, and lifting restrictions on retail and indoor recreation sites — as early as this weekend.

Brian Pallister said Tuesday the province is looking for public feed back on the plan, which could see the fourth phase of reopening kick in starting as early as July 25.

Read more:
Manitoba to make bid for Winnipeg to be a CFL hub city, should season go ahead

“Thanks to the efforts of all Manitobans, we continue to lead in recovery and have among the lowest COVID-19 test positivity rates in the country,” said Pallister in a release.

“That means we can continue our careful, balanced plan to restart our economy, give people back their lives and get Manitobans back to work.”

Story continues below advertisement

The province’s draft plan for Phase Four reopening includes:

  • increasing gathering sizes to 75 people indoors and 250 outdoors, where members of the public are reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from others, except for brief exchanges. Larger group sizes would be allowed where distinct groups of 75 or 250 can be separated to prevent contact with other groups.
  • increasing visitation at personal care and long-term care facilities, ensuring a balanced approach to visitation is required which mitigates the risk of COVID-19 transmission within sites. Each resident or designate would be able to identify two support people who would be able to visit the resident’s room indoors. Outdoor visits would be allowed for a reasonable number of visitors (up to four people) per resident, depending on availability of space. Each site will need to develop specific plans for enabling outdoor/indoor visitation by visitors to ensure the safety of residents within the facilities.
  • adjusting restrictions for faith-based gatherings, pow wows and other cultural and spiritual events, as well as resuming live theatrical performances and movie theatres. No cohorts will be required and capacity will increase to 50 per cent of the site’s capacity or 500 people, whichever is lower. Adequate physical distancing between individuals and households must continue to be provided.
  • opening casinos, with a maximum occupancy of 50 per cent of the site’s capacity. Physical distancing, and frequent and enhanced cleaning and wiping of surfaces are required.
  • lifting occupancy restrictions in all retail settings and indoor recreation sites except for gyms, fitness centres, martial arts, gymnastic clubs and yoga studios. These sites must remain at occupancy levels of 50 per cent or one person per 10 square metres, whichever is lower.
  • allowing closer distancing at therapeutic health businesses and personal service businesses such as hair and nail salons where a non-permeable barrier is installed.
  • allowing counter walk-up service in bars, beverage rooms and brew pubs provided non-permeable barriers and hand sanitizer is available for patrons, along with more frequent cleaning and wiping of services.

The province is also looking at removing the 14-day, self-isolation travel restriction for domestic travel within Canada, the premier added.

Story continues below advertisement

Currently, anyone entering Manitoba from the Atlantic provinces and Quebec, as well as Ontario communities east of Terrace Bay — a small community on Lake Superior — are required to self-isolate for two weeks.

Pallister said Manitoba is the only province outside the Atlantic region with such a rule for domestic visitors, and doing away with it can be done safely.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

“We’ve demonstrated that we have the discipline to live with each other while maintaining … distancing, while doing our hand-washing, while keeping each other safe,” Pallister said.

“I would say to those who are afraid, I’m afraid too, I’m afraid too. But I’m not going to let fear rule my life and I’d ask you not to let fear rule yours.”

Story continues below advertisement

Manitobans can weigh in on the proposed changes at the province’s website and a telephone town hall meeting is planned for Wednesday.

On Monday the premier announced the province will make a bid for Winnipeg to be a hub city for a shortened CFL season amid COVID-19, should the league go ahead with play later this year.

He said the province is committing $2.5 million to help encourage the CFL to choose Winnipeg.

Read more:
Manitoba’s coronavirus case counts jumps by 11 Monday, 1 patient in ICU

Story continues below advertisement

Pallister said the money will come from an $8 million event attraction strategy, aiming to “maximize the potential” of destinations in both Winnipeg and rural Manitoba to host “large-scale meetings, conventions, and events.”

Manitoba has recorded 366 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases to date — a lower rate than most other provinces. Seven people have died and 41 cases remained active Tuesday.

The province had dropped to one active case on July 13, but has seen an outbreak on a few Hutterite colonies in recent days and a couple of positive tests among international travellers.

The Opposition New Democrats said the government should hire more nurses and child-care workers as more businesses open up, and also consider a greater focus on masks.

Story continues below advertisement

“The province should start encouraging Manitobans (to) wear masks as a reasonable tradeoff to keep families safe as additional reopening measures are implemented,” NDP Leader Wab Kinew said in a written statement.

Read more:
Coronavirus: 12 new cases reported in Manitoba Tuesday

Liberal Leader Dougald Lamont criticized the loosening of interprovincial travel rules.

“The Premier seems to think that Manitoba is somehow immune from COVID-19. We have not beaten it. We have only kept it at bay,” Lamont said.

–With files from The Canadian Press






1:13
Manitoba Hutterite Colonies hit by COVID-19


Manitoba Hutterite Colonies hit by COVID-19

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

Story continues below advertisement

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Tokyo Olympics Day 11 Review: Andre De Grasse sets scorching pace in men's 200m – Yahoo Canada Sports

Published

 on


The majority of action during the Tokyo Olympics happens when most Canadians are fast asleep. While you were cozy in your bed, however, members of Team Canada were making their push for the podium.

Here’s what you missed from Day 10 of the Summer Games:

Women’s K1 200m Canoe Sprint: Andreanne Langlois qualifies for Final A

Rowing to a time of 39.952 seconds, Langlois claimed third place in Semifinal 2 to earn a lane in Final A. Fellow Canadian Michelle Russell finished with a time of 40.224 seconds, but she placed seventh in Semifinal 2 and raced in Final B.

In Final A, Langlois finished ninth with a time of 40.473 seconds.

Men’s C2 1000m Canoe Sprint: Roland Varga and Connor Fitzpatrick secure lane in Final A

The Canadian duo of Varga and Fitzpatrick captured a spot in Final A after finishing third in Semifinal 2 with a time of 3:27.145. 

In Final A, Varga and Fitzpatrick placed sixth with a time of 3:30.157.

Women’s 400m: Kyra Constantine earns spot in semifinal

Finishing 21st overall in Round 1 with a time of 51.69 seconds, Constantine was the lone Canadian to advance to the semis. Country-mate Natassha McDonald placed 36th with a time of 53.54 seconds and did not advance.

Andre De Grasse raced into the men's 200m final with a Canadian-record time, and everything else you missed from Day 11 in Tokyo. (Getty)

Andre De Grasse raced into the men’s 200m final with a Canadian-record time, and everything else you missed from Day 11 in Tokyo. (Getty)

Men’s 200m: Andre De Grasse and Aaron Brown will race for gold

After both Canadians advanced from Round 1, De Grasse and Brown finished first (19.73 seconds) and third (19.99 seconds), respectively, in the semifinal to earn a lane in the final with an opportunity to win the gold medal.

The men’s 200m final is set to take place on Wednesday, August 4 at 8:55 AM EDT.

Women’s Team Pursuit Cycling: Canada finishes fourth in bronze final

Racing with the United States, Canada timed in at 4:10.552, which just put them off the podium with a fourth-place finish.

The U.S. won bronze, Great Britain secured silver, and Germany captured gold.

Women’s Beam Gymnastics: Elsabeth Black narrowly misses podium

Totalling 13.866 in the final, Black finished fourth in the event.

Simone Biles of the U.S. earned bronze with a score of 14.000. Tang Xijing of China won silver with a score of 14.233, and China’s Guan Chenchen claimed gold with a score of 14.633.

Men’s 5000m: Justyn Knight and Mohammed Ahmed advance from Round 1

Knight finished with a time of 13:30.22 to place third while Ahmed raced to a time of 13:38.96 to finish 13th. Both competitors advanced to the next race.

Fellow Canadian Lucas Bruchet finished 27th with a time of 13:44.08, but he did not qualify.

Women’s Duet Artistic Swimming: Claudia Holzner and Jacqueline Simoneau qualify for final

Earning a combined score of 182.7131 in the duet free routine and technical routine, Holzner and Simoneau finished fifth in the preliminary round to advance to the duet free routine final.

Women’s Hammer Throw: Camryn Rogers finishes fifth in final

Throwing an impressive distance of 74.35m, Rogers finished fifth in the final.

Poland’s Malwina Kopron captured bronze with a distance of 75.49m, China’s Wang Zheng nabbed silver with a distance of 77.03m, while Anita Wlodarczyk of Poland scored gold with a distance of 78.48m.

Women’s Beach Volleyball: Both Canadian squads ousted in quarterfinals 

The defending world champions, Canadians Sarah Pavan and Melissa Humana-Paredes, were upset in the quarters in three sets by Australia’s Taliqua Clancy and Mariafe Artacho del Solar. The Canadian pair settles for fifth place in Tokyo.

Canada’s Heather Bansley and Brandie Wilkerson were also eliminated from medal contention on Tuesday, falling to Latvia’s Tina Graudina and Anastasija Kravcenoka in three sets.

When it comes to athletic accomplishments at the Olympics, none may be better than what we saw from Warholm on Day 11.

The Norwegian star completed the 400m hurdles in 45.94 seconds, absolutely demolishing his own previous world record of 46.70 seconds.

It’s truly an incredible accomplishment, especially when you consider the fastest time of any runner in the 400m semifinal with no hurdles was 43.88 seconds at these Olympics.

Equally impressive to his race was his celebration, as Warholm was absolutely wired.

That’s a gold medal celebration.

How many medals has Canada won in the Summer Olympics?

Canada has 14 medals in Tokyo heading into Day 12.

Gold: Margaret Mac Neil (women’s 100m butterfly), Maude Charron (weightlifting, women’s 64kg), Women’s Eight Rowing

Silver: Women’s 4x100m freestyle relay, Jennifer Abel and Melissa Citrini-Beaulieu (women’s 3m synchronized springboard), Kylie Masse (women’s 100m backstroke), Kylie Masse (women’s 200m backstroke)

Bronze: Jessica Klimkait (judo, women’s under-57 kg), Softball, Catherine Beauchemin-Pinard (judo, women’s 63kg), Penny Oleksiak (women’s 200m freestyle), Caileigh Filmer and Hillary Janssens (women’s pair rowing), Women’s 4×100 medley relay, Andre De Grasse (men’s 100m)

More from Yahoo Sports

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Olympic wake-up call: Simone Biles, Ellie Black inspire on beam, kayaker wins 2 gold in 1 hour – CBC.ca

Published

 on


In a highly anticipated balance beam final, gymnast Simone Biles of the United States won a bronze medal Tuesday, while Canada’s Ellie Black finished just off the podium in fourth place. 

Both women were inspiring on the beam and throughout the Tokyo Olympic Games.

Biles was returning to Olympic competition after withdrawing from events to look after her mental health. Black had reinjured her ankle in training and dropped from the individual all-around for a shot at the beam. 

Biles earned a score of 14.000 for a seventh Olympic medal, and Black delivered a powerful performance for 13.866. The 25-year-old from Halifax was tearful and embraced her coach after her performance. 

Ellie Black competes to a fourth-place finish at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre. (Lisi Niesner/Reuters)

China finally reached the podium in women’s artistic gymnastics in Tokyo. Guan Chenchen won gold and Tang Xijing earned silver.  

Here’s what else you may have missed on Tuesday in Tokyo: 

Bring on the cheers

Find live streams, must-watch video highlights, breaking news and more in one perfect Olympic Games package. Following Team Canada has never been easier or more exciting.

More from Tokyo 2020

Upcoming men’s 200-metre semis

Canada’s Andre De Grasse and Aaron Brown have both qualified to race in the men’s 200-metre semifinals. 

You can watch them compete in that race, scheduled to start at 7:50 a.m. ET here.

De Grasse ran 20.56 seconds to finish third in his qualifying heat, while Brown won his own with a time of 20.38 seconds.

De Grasse took the silver in Rio 2016, with Jamaica’s Usain Bolt speeding to his third consecutive gold medal in the event. Brown raced to 16th place.

Canada’s Andre De Grasse competes in men’s 200-metre heats during the Tokyo Olympic Games on Tuesday. (Kirby Lee/USA TODAY Sports)

It was that semifinal that gave the world the iconic photo of the pair, with De Grasse and Bolt sharing smiles as the Canadian tried to push past him at the finish. 

Sport climbing debut

It was a special moment for Canadian sport climber Sean McColl, who is among the first Olympians in the sport. 

The 33-year-old from North Vancouver had advocated for sport climbing to be included in the Games, and saw his dream become a reality with its debut in Tokyo. 

Sean McColl of Canada competes in the speed event of sport climbing at the Tokyo Olympic Games. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

“I am incredibly honoured to be part of this historical group, to be forever written into the history books of [the International Federation of Sport Climbing’s] first Olympics,” he wrote on Instagram. 

Fellow Canadian and family friend Alannah Yip, also from North Vancouver, will make her debut on Wednesday.

New Zealander wins 2 gold, 1 hour apart

It only took just over an hour for Lisa Carrington of New Zealand to paddle her way to two Olympic gold medals. 

For a third straight time, the 32-year-old claimed Olympic gold in the single kayak 200-metre race. Afterward, Carrington and partner Caitlin Regal won gold in the doubles 500-metre event. 

  • Have a weird or random question about the Tokyo Olympic Games? We want to hear from you for an upcoming story: Email us: Ask@cbc.ca

Carrington set Olympic records in both.  

Lisa Carrington of Team New Zealand reacts after winning her gold medal in the women’s K1 200-metre final at Sea Forest Waterway in Tokyo. (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)

She flew to the finish in a time of 38.120 seconds in the individual round. Then with teammate Regal, she broke the doubles time in one minute 35.785 seconds. 

Women’s team pursuit finishes 4th

The Canadian women’s team pursuit squad came fourth after losing their bronze medal race to the United States.

The Americans were silver medallists in Rio 2016 and London 2012, while Canada was looking to repeat its back-to-back bronzes.

Team Canada races in the women’s team pursuit event at the Izu Velodrome in Shizuoka, Japan. (Matthew Childs/Reuters)

The Canadian team of Allison Beveridge, Annie Foreman-Mackey, Ariane Bonhomme and Georgia Simmerling couldn’t quite catch up to their opponent and finished in a time of four minutes 10.552 seconds.

The United States were ahead in a time of four minutes 08.040 seconds. 

Canadian squads bounced from medal contention

The Canadian men’s volleyball team and women’s water polo team won’t be bringing home medals from Tokyo. Both fell in their quarter-final matches on Tuesday. 

The men went down in straight sets on the court (21-25, 28-30, 22-25) to the Russian Olympic Committee. While the Canadians were hoping to compete for a medal, their match ended in a repeat of their fate in Rio 2016

The Canadian women took on the two-time consecutive gold medallists U.S. in the pool, and lost 16-5. It was their first appearance in the Olympic tournament since Athens 2004, where the women finished seventh and didn’t reach the quarter-final stages. 

Smashing a world record

Norweigan hurdler Karsten Warholm destroyed his previous world record in the intense heat and humidity of Tokyo. 

It had only been a month and two days since he broke it the first time, shattering a record held by American Kevin Young that stood since the Barcelona Olympics in 1992. 

Karsten Warholm of Norway celebrates after winning gold Tuesday and setting a new world record in the men’s 400-metre hurdles. (Phil Noble/Reuters)

Warholm had an incredible performance in the 400-metre hurdles final, winning gold in a time of 45.94 seconds. The 25-year-old’s jaw dropped when he saw his time. He grabbed his jersey, ripping it open across his chest in celebration. 

American Rai Benjamin broke the record, too, but came close behind in second. 

  • Have a weird or random question about the Olympic Games? We want to hear from you for an upcoming story: Email us: Ask@cbc.ca

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Record-holding Canadian sprinter, Olympic medallist Angela Bailey dies at 59 – CTV News

Published

 on


MISSISSAUGA, ONT. —
Angela Bailey, the Canadian women’s record holder in the 100-metre sprint and an Olympic 4×100 relay silver medal winner, has died after battling cancer under complicated conditions. She was 59 years old.

Bailey’s 1987 Canadian women’s 100-metre sprint record time of 10.98 seconds still stands today. She was also part of the women’s silver medal-winning 4×100 metres relay team at the 1984 Games in Los Angeles.

Athletics Canada confirmed Bailey’s July 31 death in a statement Monday and offered condolences to her family and loved ones.

“I was very sad to hear of Angela’s passing. I remember her as a talented and determined athlete,” Athletics Canada board chair Helen Manning said. “The Athletics Canada family sends their thoughts and sympathy to her family at this sad time.”

Bailey’s medal-winning relay team members, Marita Payne, Angella Taylor-Issajenko and France Gareau, also paid tribute to her in a statement.

“We are in shock and deeply saddened by the sudden passing of our teammate, Angela Bailey,” said the statement. “Our deepest condolences go out to Angela’s family and close friends. She was a tremendous competitor on the track and we will always cherish the memories we made together. Rest peacefully our friend.”

Doug Clement, a former Olympic team doctor and a middle-distance track coach in the 1980s when Bailey was competing, said he recalled seeing and speaking with her at events.

“She stood out as a strong personality,” he said from Vancouver. “She stood out as the sort of person who was athletically and academically gifted. I would say she stood out as being a very vital person, a strong competitor.”

Bailey also won three silver medals in 4×100 relays at the Commonwealth Games in 1978, 1982 and 1986.

She set the Canadian 100m record in July 1987 in Hungary and earlier that year also won bronze in the 60m at the World Indoor Championships.

Bailey also holds Canada’s indoor track record for the 200m at 23.32 seconds.

She also competed in the 4×100 relay and 100m events at the 1988 Games in Seoul.

Bailey was part of the 1980 Canadian team that did not compete in the Moscow Games because of an international boycott.

Bailey earned a law degree from Queen’s University in 1996 and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 2003.

She was inducted into the Mississauga Sports Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Athletics Ontario Hall of Fame in 2014.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 2, 2021.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending