Connect with us

Media

Media Beat: July 12, 2021 | FYIMusicNews – FYI Music News

Published

 on


Massive film and TV studio to be built in Toronto

Hackman Capital Partners is planning to build a major film and TV production studio complex at the Downsview Airport Lands in northwest Toronto. The site spans 370 acres and will include stages ranging from 20K to 80K square feet. – Chris Evans, KFTV

Cathy Jones’ 22 Minutes at the CBC are up

Though Jones is not at liberty to discuss the details of her departure, she denies rumours that she was fired because of political differences or a refusal to comply with Covid-19 protocols. While the comedian is vocally against both masks and vaccines, she states that her relationship with 22 Minutes and its production company remains positive. – Gabrielle Drolet, The Coast

Oscar Peterson doc among Bell Media’s super-sized 2021-22 season lineup

Bell Media recently confirmed a robust Canadian content lineup of more than 75 titles for its 2021-22 season, featuring orders of new original series, documentaries, and specials. Among them, a Crave original doc about jazz legend Oscar Peterson featuring exclusive interviews with Billy Joel, Quincy Jones, Herbie Hancock and Ramsey Lewis. – The Suburban

New AFN chief commits to whistleblower policy

Just days after a report on allegations of bullying and harassment against Chief RoseAnne Archibald was leaked — and hours after she was elected the new national chief of the Assembly of First Nations — Archibald said today she would support the implementation of a whistleblower policy at the AFM. – Rhiannon Johnson, CBC News

Dialing in for radio funeral announcements

I remember hearing these announcements as a kid during family car trips to Sydney River. I don’t recall hearing these on city radio stations, notably CHNS or CJCH, which were often on in our house. I do remember hearing some of these announcements a couple of summers ago while travelling along the South Shore.

I was curious how common these announcements still are, so I called a few stations and learned that many stations do have these announcements. – Jailhouse Parker, Halifax Examiner

Netflix hires first podcast director

Netflix has hired N’Jeri Eaton, previously head of content for Apple Podcasts, to lead podcasting for the streaming giant’s marketing division.

Prior to joining Apple, Eaton worked at NPR for four years, most recently as senior manager of program acquisitions. At NPR, she sourced new talent, partnerships and content including “Believed” (a Peabody Award winner), “White Lies” (a Pulitzer Prize finalist) and “No Compromise,” an investigative podcast about gun rights activists (which won the 2021 Pulitzer for audio reporting). – Todd Spangler, Variety

Chameleon ownership and toilet maintenance: the best obscure podcasts

Podcasting is frequently hailed as a democratic medium, meaning anyone with an internet connection and a recording device can cobble one together. For listeners, this is both a blessing and a curse: just because you can doesn’t mean you should. Nonetheless, this brave new world of audio has yielded a host of unexpected themes and formats which, in ye olden days of radio, would have been laughed off the airwaves. All are testament to podcasting’s indulgence of niche and, frankly, weird pursuits. Behold the crème de la crème of obscure stuff to stick in your ears. – Fiona Sturges, The Guardian

Newspaper gunman killed 5 in revenge for article

The man who murdered five people at a Maryland newspaper acted out of revenge for an article about his prior harassment case that he believed would hurt his ability to get dates with women, a prosecutor said Thursday during a trial to determine whether the shooter is criminally responsible due to insanity. – Brian Witte, AP

Amazon’s Pay-to-Play racket

In the best traditions of Tony Soprano and other strong-arm artists, Amazon uses threats and coercion to gain ownership positions in companies it does business with.

In a front page story this week, The Wall Street Journal exposed how “Amazon Demands One More Thing from Some Vendors: A Piece of Their Company.”

According to the Journal, if companies want to do business with Amazon they might find that there’s a little catch: “the right for Amazon to buy big stakes in their companies at potentially steep discounts to market value.”

An offer they can’t refuse: The Journal reported…”executives at several of the companies said they felt they couldn’t refuse Amazon’s push for the right to buy the stock…”

Other highlights:
   – Amazon has gained ownership in 75 private companies this way
   – They’ve also coerced publicly traded companies to issue them “warrants” which allow them to buy future stock at current prices
   – The value of these deals “amount(s) to billions of dollars across companies that provide everything from call-center services to natural gas, and in some cases position Amazon among the top shareholders in those businesses.”
   – One party to one of these strong-arm deals said “There was definitely a sense that if it wasn’t agreed to there wouldn’t be a deal…”

Lovely people these tech creeps. – Bob Hoffman, The Ad Contrarian

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Social media extortion cases are increasing: FSJ RCMP – Energeticcity.ca

Published

 on


Shortly after, the individual receives a message or email saying that the video has been recorded and that the video will be released to family and friends unless a certain amount of money is paid.

“As anonymous as social media may seem, certain activities can come with some terrible consequences,” said Constable Chad Neustaeter, Media Relations Officer for the Fort St John RCMP detachment.

“Individuals need to take steps to protect themselves because there are always those looking to take advantage of others.”

Steps to keep yourself safe online:

  • Don’t accept friend requests from people you don’t know,
  • Don’t share any personal information with anyone such as date of birth, Social Insurance Number or banking information,
  • Don’t share intimate photos of yourself because once you have sent them, you can never get them back,
  • Be aware that the person on the other end of a video chat could record the entire interaction.

Police advise extortion victims not to forward any money after these requests and file a report with the police.

Mounties say if banking information is shared, contact the bank, flag accounts and check in with both credit bureaus, either Equifax or TransUnion.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Media Beat: August 05, 2021 | FYIMusicNews – FYI Music News

Published

 on


Toronto, Vancouver Island protests put spotlight on media access

Police and politicians’ efforts to limit public access to recent events in Toronto and Vancouver Island have cast a spotlight on the role of journalists and spurred concerns over freedom of the press.

The decision by authorities in Toronto to fence off public parks last month as municipal staff and police cleared homeless encampments sparked backlash from media outlets and advocates, who have petitioned the city to allow reporters on site during the operations.

The push for media access in Toronto came on the heels of a court decision that ordered RCMP in British Columbia to allow reporters entry to blockades in Fairy Creek, where demonstrators have been protesting old-growth logging. – Elena De Luigi, The Canadian Press

The three next steps required to preserve journalism in the digital age

As Canadian news organizations continue their unsustainable revenue decline, who should step into the breach but Facebook and Google, the two giant platforms that gobble up three quarters of all digital ad dollars?

They have signed secret deals with dozens of desperate publishers to provide financial and other supports.

On the surface, their assistance may appear a positive development. Closer consideration reveals a disturbing new dependency. One of the great functions of journalism is to hold the powerful — political and economic — to account. – Edward Greenspon & Katie Davey, The Star

Zoom reaches US $85M settlement over user privacy, ‘Zoombombing’

Zoom Video Communications Inc. has agreed to pay US$85 million and bolster its security practices to settle a lawsuit claiming it violated users’ privacy rights by sharing personal data with Facebook, Google and LinkedIn, and letting hackers disrupt Zoom meetings in a practice called Zoombombing.

Though Zoom collected about $1.3B in Zoom Meetings subscriptions from class members, the plaintiffs’ lawyers called the $85 million settlement reasonable given the litigation risks. They intend to seek up to $21.25 million for legal fees. – Jonathan Stempel, Reuters

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Toronto, Vancouver Island protests shine spotlight on media access – Peace Arch News – Peace Arch News

Published

 on


Police and politicians’ efforts to limit public access to recent events in Toronto and Vancouver Island have cast a spotlight on the role of journalists and spurred concerns over freedom of the press.

The decision by authorities in Toronto to fence off public parks last month as municipal staff and police cleared homeless encampments sparked backlash from media outlets and advocates, who have petitioned the city to allow reporters on site during the operations.

The push for media access in Toronto came on the heels of a court decision that ordered RCMP in British Columbia to allow reporters entry to blockades in Fairy Creek, where demonstrators have been protesting old-growth logging. The judge in that case, which was launched after journalists reported being blocked from the site, found police should only restrict access if there is an operational or safety concern.

In Toronto, the city has moved to dismantle several homeless encampments — which emerged during the pandemic as many avoided shelters over fears of COVID-19 — sparking protests and confrontations that have at times erupted into violence.

The Canadian Association of Journalists called the move to bar reporters from Toronto parks during the clearing of the camps “disappointing to witness and wholly unacceptable,” and stressed media rights are enshrined in law.

“Stop arresting or threatening reporters for no good reason. That’s a red line that cannot be crossed,” Brent Jolly, the association’s president, said in an email.

Tensions boiled over at Lamport Stadium Park two weeks ago after a large crowd refused to leave the site that authorities had fenced in. Multiple scuffles broke out and police were seen pushing those who didn’t comply. By the end of the day, police said 26 people were arrested and charged with offences that included assault with a weapon, assaulting a peace officer and trespassing.

A day earlier, an encampment at Alexandra Park was cleared by city staff and police after a fence was put up. That operation also saw several people arrested, including a photojournalist with The Canadian Press who was escorted out of the closed-off area in handcuffs. He was issued a notice of trespass, which doesn’t carry a charge but bars him from returning to the site for 90 days.

A spokesman for the city said staff closed off the parks during the clearings and prevented anyone from going in, “not just media,” in order to speak to those living in the encampment, as well as remove tents and debris.

“We understand and appreciate the concerns raised by the media and the role they have in bearing witness and documenting city operations,” Brad Ross said in a statement.

He said the city arranged pooled media coverage for the Lamport Stadium operation, which typically allows select members of the media access to an event so they can later share the material they gather with others.

“The pool arrangement was designed to allow media to see the city’s actions, while ensuring the safety of all, as well as addressing the sensitivity around privacy,” Ross said.

The CAJ’s Jolly said, however, that the pool coverage the city set up for the encampment clearing was “inadequate” because it restricted the ability for journalists to “freely cover” evictions taking place in a public park.

“Attempting to control the work of journalists while they are doing their job is entirely inappropriate,” he said, adding that a pool arrangement is generally used when there is limited space for press.

“The work journalists do is both professional and conducted in service to the public and any attempts to short-circuit that work is wholly incompatible with the long-standing tradition of a free press in Canada.”

Carissima Mathen, a common law professor with the University of Ottawa, said mounting an effective legal challenge to get access to “relatively short-term” events is difficult because it likely won’t be possible to get an injunction in time.

“It’s possible that you could try and make the case right after the fact to get some kind of declaration, but it’s usually not very practical,” she said.

Mathen said it is important to consider questions like how far from a fence police and city staff are when they’re carrying out their operations, whether reporters can speak with people as they come out, and how long barricades will stay up.

In the case of Fairy Creek, since it had been happening for weeks, those journalists were able to get an injunction to stop the RCMP from barring them from entering the blockades, Mathen said.

Five Toronto councillors who wrote to the city’s mayor last month denouncing the “extreme show of force” during the clearing of encampments said any obstruction of media access to the operations is “undemocratic and unconstitutional.”

—The Canadian Press

RELATED: Fairy Creek old-growth protests hit 500-arrest mark

RELATED: UK judge refuses US extradition of WikiLeaks founder Assange

Media industry

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending