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NASA celebrates Hubble's 30th birthday with this gorgeous image of starbirth – DIYphotography

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On 24 April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope started its journey, when the space shuttle Discovery and its five-astronaut crew took it from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It was deployed into Earth orbit a day later and has been taking magnificent photos of space ever since. The photo Hubble took on its 30th birthday is nothing less impressive than others, and it shows the incredible beauty of starbirth.

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“In this Hubble portrait, the giant red nebula (NGC 2014) and its smaller blue neighbor (NGC 2020) are part of a vast star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, located 163,000 light-years away, NASA writes. “The image is nicknamed the ‘Cosmic Reef,’ because it resembles an undersea world.”

Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for science at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. said:

“Hubble has given us stunning insights about the universe, from nearby planets to the farthest galaxies we have seen so far. It was revolutionary to launch such a large telescope 30 years ago, and this astronomy powerhouse is still delivering revolutionary science today. Its spectacular images have captured the imagination for decades, and will continue to inspire humanity for years to come.”

Although Hubble has given us some of the most iconic and most important photos of space, you probably know that it wasn’t at its best shape when it was first launched. There was a small imperfection in the mirror that caused the images to come out blurry. NASA first sent astronauts to repair it in December 1993. Between 1993 and 2009, there were five repair missions in total. Thanks to them, Hubble has been up and running for so long. And it’s been providing scientists and the public with amazing – and tack sharp – images of space.

If you’d like to see what Hubble captured on your birthday, you can check it out here. And I’d say that the latest photo it took is certainly a pretty epic one to celebrate its 30th birthday. If you want to read more about it, make sure to check out NASA’s website. So, in the end, what else can I say except – Happy birthday, Hubble!

[via The Verge; image credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI]

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Crew Dragon with two NASA astronauts docks to ISS – TASS

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NEW YORK, May 31. /TASS/. The Crew Dragon spacecraft with Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken on board has successfully docked to the International Space Station (ISS), as follows from a NASA broadcast on Sunday.

The spacecraft began approaching the ISS about two hours before docking than was carried out 10:16 ahead of the schedule. The Crew Dragon spacecraft was launched using the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at 22.22 pm Moscow time on May 30 from the Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Crew Dragon is a configuration of the cargo spacecraft Dragon, which had already delivered cargoes to the ISS. A Falcon-9 rocket put the cargo vehicle in space on March 2. Its docking with the ISS was carried out automatically the next day.

NASA stopped crewed flights in 2011 after the Space Shuttle program came to an end. From that moment on all astronauts were delivered to the ISS and back by Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft. Originally the Untied States was to start using commercial spacecraft for crewed missions in 2017.

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Toddler could be battling rare syndrome in response to COVID-19 – Winnipeg Free Press

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More than a month after testing positive for COVID-19, a Winnipeg toddler is fighting another illness – a possible rare inflammatory syndrome that could be part of the body’s reaction to new viruses.

The girl’s mother told CBC News doctors are trying to find out whether the one-year-old has developed Kawasaki disease, or multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children, now that she is negative for COVID-19 but is still seriously ill.

To read more of this story first reported by CBC News, click here.

The Winnipeg Free Press and CBC Manitoba recognize each other as trusted news sources. This content is made available to our readers as part of an agreement to collaborate to better serve our community. Any questions about CBC content should be directed to: talkback@cbc.ca

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A full Strawberry Moon illuminates Weyburn's sky – Weyburn Review

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June’s full moon, which is the last full moon of spring or the first of summer, is traditionally called the Strawberry Moon.

This full moon brings with it a penumbral eclipse, which occurs when the moon crosses through the faint outer edge of Earth’s shadow (the penumbra), making part of the moon appear slightly darker than usual. Unlike a full lunar or solar eclipse, the visual effect of a penumbral eclipse is usually so minimal that it can be difficult to see.

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This eclipse was only visible from parts of Australia, Asia, Africa, Europe, and South America, but not from North America.

The tradition of naming moons is rich in history. According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, the name, Strawberry moon, originated with Algonquin tribes in eastern North America who knew it as a signal to gather the ripening fruit of wild strawberries.

Other names for this moon include the Honey Moon and the Mead Moon. It has also been called the Rose Moon, as many roses begin blooming in June.

Historically, full moon names were used to track the seasons and, for this reason, often relate closely to nature. The moon names used today come from Native American and Colonial-era sources. Traditionally, each full moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred, rather than just the full moon itself.

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