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Nexus Real Estate Investment Trust Announces $30 Million Bought Deal Equity Offering – Financial Post

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/NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWS SERVICES OR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES/

TORONTO and MONTREAL, Feb. 10, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Nexus Real Estate Investment Trust (TSX:NXR.UN) (“Nexus” or the “REIT”) announced today that it has entered into an agreement to sell to a syndicate of underwriters led by BMO Capital Markets and Desjardins Capital Markets (collectively, the “Underwriters”), on a bought deal basis, 3,700,000 units of the REIT (the “Units”) at a price of $8.20 per Unit (the “Offering Price”) for gross proceeds of approximately $30 million (the “Offering”). The REIT has also granted the Underwriters an over-allotment option to purchase up to an additional 555,000 Units on the same terms and conditions, exercisable at any time, in whole or in part, up to 30 days after the closing of the Offering, which, if exercised in full, would increase the gross proceeds of the Offering to approximately $34.9 million.

The REIT intends to use the net proceeds from the Offering to fund the REIT’s future acquisitions and for general corporate purposes.

“We look forward to continuing to execute on our strategic growth plan, with a focus on growing our industrial portfolio,” Kelly Hanczyk, the REIT’s Chief Executive Officer stated. “The recent and pending acquisitions of industrial properties in London and Ajax, Ontario, Moncton, New Brunswick and Edmonton, Alberta demonstrate our strong commitment to increasing the industrial weighting within the REIT’s portfolio. We continue to pursue a pipeline of potential acquisition of industrial properties to capitalize on attractive opportunities. The equity offering enables us to continue the REIT’s momentum and allows us to execute on those opportunities.”

Recent Acquisition and Operational Updates

  • The REIT has a conditional agreement to acquire six industrial properties in London, Ontario which will add 1,191,184 square feet of gross leasable area (GLA) to its portfolio for a purchase price of $103.5 million, representing a 6% going-in capitalization rate. The REIT expects to issue approximately $65.6 million in Class B LP units to the vendor at a price of $7.64 per unit, which approximates the trading price of the REIT’s units at the time of entering into the conditional agreement. Closing is anticipated for April 1, 2021.
  • The REIT has a conditional agreement to acquire two industrial buildings in Edmonton, Alberta with 108,156 square feet of GLA for $14 million. The buildings are fully leased to non-oil and gas tenants. The REIT expects to issue $7.0 million in Class B LP units to the vendor at a price of $8.20 per unit. Closing is anticipated for March 1, 2021.
  • On December 31, 2020, the REIT completed the acquisition of a 50% interest in a 500,000 square foot industrial property (including 95,000 square foot building expansion) located in Ajax, Ontario for $28.5 million, which was partially financed with new mortgage proceeds.
  • On December 1, 2020, the REIT completed the acquisition of a single-tenant industrial property with 93,443 square feet of GLA in Moncton, New Brunswick for $8.0 million, representing 7.5% going-in capitalization rate. The building is fully leased to a Fortune 500 company. The REIT issued $3.2 million in Units to the vendor at a deemed value of $8.00 per Unit, to partially satisfy the purchase price.
  • To date, the REIT has collected 97.4% of contractual gross rent charged between March and December 2020, and has collected 96.6% of its December 2020 contractual gross rent.

The Units under the Offering will be offered in Canada pursuant to a short form prospectus to be filed with the securities commissions and other similar regulatory authorities in each of the provinces of Canada, pursuant to National Instrument 44-101 – Short Form Prospectus Distributions. The Offering is subject to customary conditions and receipt of all necessary approvals, including the approval of the Toronto Stock Exchange. The Offering is expected to close on or about March 4, 2021.

The Units have not been, nor will they be, registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended, (the “1933 Act”) and may not be offered, sold or delivered, directly or indirectly, in the United States, or to, or for the account or benefit of, “U.S. persons” (as defined in Regulation S under the 1933 Act), except pursuant to an exemption from the registration requirements of the 1933 Act. This press release does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any Units in the United States or to, or for the account or benefit of, U.S. persons.

About Nexus REIT

Nexus is a growth-oriented real estate investment trust focused on increasing unitholder value through the acquisition, ownership and management of industrial, office and retail properties located in primary and secondary markets in North America. The REIT currently owns a portfolio of 75 properties comprising approximately 4.4 million square feet of rentable area. The REIT has approximately 28,095,000 Units issued and outstanding. Additionally, there are Class B LP units of subsidiary limited partnerships of Nexus issued and outstanding, which are convertible into approximately 6,326,000 Units.

Forward Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this news release constitute forward-looking statements which reflect the REIT’s current expectations and projections about future results. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “estimates”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, or “believes”, or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results “may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken, occur or be achieved. Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the REIT to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Actual results and developments are likely to differ, and may differ materially, from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in this news release. Such forward-looking statements are based on a number of assumptions that may prove to be incorrect.

While the REIT anticipates that subsequent events and developments may cause its views to change, the REIT specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements except as required by applicable law. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing the REIT’s views as of any date subsequent to the date of this news release. There can be no assurance that forward-looking statements will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward- looking statements. The factors identified above are not intended to represent a complete list of the factors that could affect the REIT.

For further information please contact:
Kelly Hanczyk, CEO at (416) 906-2379; or
Rob Chiasson, CFO at (416) 613-1262.

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Pattie Lovett-Reid: Bank of Canada governor sees signs of 'excess exuberance' in real estate market – CTV News

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HUNTSVILLE, ONT. —
Over the past year, one thing has become abundantly clear as we work from home. We now know with crystal clear clarity what our homespace should look like. If it didn’t meet your new expectations, you likely have been on the move.

The result? Home prices are on the rise, and this has caught the attention of the Bank of Canada governor Tiff Macklem. 

Throughout the pandemic, one of the pillars of the economy has been the real estate market. Rising demand, constrained supply and rock-bottom rates are all conspiring to lead us to believe home prices have only one way to go: higher. 

Now to be fair, home prices have been on the rise, but we still have a long way to go before we get to the heated market of five years ago. But that doesn’t mean the Bank of Canada isn’t watching this closely. Macklem has stated he is seeing early signs of what he called “excess exuberance,” with people expecting the recent increases in prices to go on indefinitely. 

I have learned that nothing goes on indefinitely when one of the variables changes. In this case, it could be mortgage rates.

Canadians might have grown accustomed to fixed rates continuously declining after the five-year fixed rate in Canada reached a record low this past summer of 1.39 per cent.

This is about to change for the first time since the pandemic began.

According to RateHub.ca, fixed rates are on the rise in response to higher-than-expected inflation in January. And if this inflation continues to go higher and optimism around the vaccine rollout continues, Canadians should expect to see rates continue to move higher. By the end of the week, the expectation is for the best rate to be 1.54 per cent.

Call to action: if you are in a variable rate mortgage, you might want to consider locking in. If you are first time homebuyer, a mortgage pre-approval today will hold rates for 90-120 days. 

According to the RateHub.ca mortgage calculator, a homeowner with a 10 per cent downpayment on a $500,000 home with a five-year fixed rate of 1.39 per cent and a 25-year amortization would see their payments increase per month by $32.00, or $384.00 per year, if rates increase to 1.54 per cent.

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B.C. real estate: Bidding wars again hitting high-end housing market – Vancouver Sun

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One recent sale went more than $1.6 million over the asking price, while another went $700,000 higher.

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When the COVID-19 real estate boom started, multiple offers and over-asking sale prices were mostly happening for detached homes in the $1.5 million to $2 million range in parts of East Vancouver and North Vancouver, and lower-prices houses in the Fraser Valley.

Now, there are signs of this moving into more expensive housing. In particular, there were two eye-popping sales in mid-February, one that went for over $700,000 the asking price, and the other for more than $1.6 million higher than the asking price.

In a fast-escalating market with heated demand and multiple offers, it can be challenging for sellers and real estate agents to determine an asking price by relying on a property’s assessment or recent sales of a similar property. This can lead to sale prices that are hundreds of thousands of dollars over the asking price.

For example, at the beginning of the real estate boom between 2014 to 2018, a home in Shaughnessy sold for $2 million over the asking price of $5.99 million in March 2015. Later, in June 2015, there was a sale of a home in West Vancouver that caught attention for selling for $1.1 million over the asking price of $2.98 million. These were one-off sales, but they help set a higher comparable price or margin for next sales.

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Real estate agents say “cheap money” or very low interest rates are spurring sales and prices. Existing homeowners are refinancing at low rates and taking that cash to make another property investment. First time buyers or those with less home equity also benefit from low interest rates, but they are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing for sales that involve multiple and over asking price offers because they have to bid in smaller increments and take fewer risks such as forgoing a house inspection before the sale closes.

Vancouver real estate agent Muzda Stenner described the recent scene at a West Vancouver detached home on Queens Avenue that was on sale for $2.877 million.

“It was almost like a garage sale (with) cars lined up on the street,” said Stenner. “Even with COVID, and people wearing masks, it was a full house, and people were trying to get in.”

The home is assessed at $2.69 million. She helped her client bid “$3 million, with subjects” to buy the home. “And it was like, ‘no, no, no.’ I had one of the lowest bids.”

With some 19 other offers, the home went under contract in mid-February to be sold for $3.6 million or $723,000 over the asking price.

“It had great potential, but it was a very small house,” said Stenner of the 3,000-square-foot, two-storey home on a 12,000-square foot lot with ocean views that was built in 1957.

On the West side, a 4,000-square-foot, five bedroom, rancher-style home on West 41st Avenue just west of Granville Street went under contract in mid-February to be sold for $5.66 million.

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The property, which is assessed at $3.95 million got one offer at the asking price of $3.98 million, but three other offers that were all above that, according to the listing agent, Sarina Han. The sale price was $1.68 million over the asking price.

Han said the property has RS-3 zoning, which allows for a single-family home in keeping with the design and density of the surrounding area, even though it is on busy 41st Street near a major intersection at Granville Street.

The condo market, which has been described as more balanced in pricing because there is more supply of listings and because more buyers were seeking larger homes with outdoor space to cope with the pandemic, is also seeing some of this frenzied activity, according to some real estate agents.

Ian Watt said he was juggling two multiple offer situations for potential condo buyers one recent evening. One condo they were interested in got five offers and the other had 14 of them. It was a one-bedroom, 965-square-foot condo in Kits that was asking $899,999, but sold for $1.107 million or $207,001 over asking price.

“I lost out with my buyers because someone totally overpaid,” said Watt.

jlee-young@postmedia.com

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

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B.C. real estate: Bidding wars again hitting high-end housing market – Vancouver Sun

Published

 on


One recent sale went more than $1.6 million over the asking price, while another went $700,000 higher.

Article content

When the COVID-19 real estate boom started, multiple offers and over-asking sale prices were mostly happening for detached homes in the $1.5 million to $2 million range in parts of East Vancouver and North Vancouver, and lower-prices houses in the Fraser Valley.

Now, there are signs of this moving into more expensive housing. In particular, there were two eye-popping sales in mid-February, one that went for over $700,000 the asking price, and the other for more than $1.6 million higher than the asking price.

In a fast-escalating market with heated demand and multiple offers, it can be challenging for sellers and real estate agents to determine an asking price by relying on a property’s assessment or recent sales of a similar property. This can lead to sale prices that are hundreds of thousands of dollars over the asking price.

For example, at the beginning of the real estate boom between 2014 to 2018, a home in Shaughnessy sold for $2 million over the asking price of $5.99 million in March 2015. Later, in June 2015, there was a sale of a home in West Vancouver that caught attention for selling for $1.1 million over the asking price of $2.98 million. These were one-off sales, but they help set a higher comparable price or margin for next sales.

Advertisement

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Real estate agents say “cheap money” or very low interest rates are spurring sales and prices. Existing homeowners are refinancing at low rates and taking that cash to make another property investment. First time buyers or those with less home equity also benefit from low interest rates, but they are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing for sales that involve multiple and over asking price offers because they have to bid in smaller increments and take fewer risks such as forgoing a house inspection before the sale closes.

Vancouver real estate agent Muzda Stenner described the recent scene at a West Vancouver detached home on Queens Avenue that was on sale for $2.877 million.

“It was almost like a garage sale (with) cars lined up on the street,” said Stenner. “Even with COVID, and people wearing masks, it was a full house, and people were trying to get in.”

The home is assessed at $2.69 million. She helped her client bid “$3 million, with subjects” to buy the home. “And it was like, ‘no, no, no.’ I had one of the lowest bids.”

With some 19 other offers, the home went under contract in mid-February to be sold for $3.6 million or $723,000 over the asking price.

“It had great potential, but it was a very small house,” said Stenner of the 3,000-square-foot, two-storey home on a 12,000-square foot lot with ocean views that was built in 1957.

On the West side, a 4,000-square-foot, five bedroom, rancher-style home on West 41st Avenue just west of Granville Street went under contract in mid-February to be sold for $5.66 million.

Advertisement

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

The property, which is assessed at $3.95 million got one offer at the asking price of $3.98 million, but three other offers that were all above that, according to the listing agent, Sarina Han. The sale price was $1.68 million over the asking price.

Han said the property has RS-3 zoning, which allows for a single-family home in keeping with the design and density of the surrounding area, even though it is on busy 41st Street near a major intersection at Granville Street.

The condo market, which has been described as more balanced in pricing because there is more supply of listings and because more buyers were seeking larger homes with outdoor space to cope with the pandemic, is also seeing some of this frenzied activity, according to some real estate agents.

Ian Watt said he was juggling two multiple offer situations for potential condo buyers one recent evening. One condo they were interested in got five offers and the other had 14 of them. It was a one-bedroom, 965-square-foot condo in Kits that was asking $899,999, but sold for $1.107 million or $207,001 over asking price.

“I lost out with my buyers because someone totally overpaid,” said Watt.

jlee-young@postmedia.com

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

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