adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Health

Niagara Health closing its COVID-19 assessment centre this Friday

Published

 on

NEWS RELEASE
NIAGARA HEALTH
***************************
Niagara Health’s COVID-19 assessment centre and COVID, cold and flu care clinics (CCFCC) will permanently close on Friday, March 31.

COVID-19 testing will be available at select pharmacies across the region, and the prescription drug Paxlovid will continue to be available through family physicians and at select pharmacies across the region. Remdesivir infusion therapy, which aids in treating COVID-19, will be available in the community.

Niagara Health’s first assessment centre opened on March 17, 2020, at our Niagara Falls Site and has since administered more than 327,000 swabs. The centres served as the primary screening and testing locations for COVID-19 in the region. The Niagara Falls centre is the final of the three to close.

Closing these operations will help our health human resources efforts by allowing teams to return to their regular work or to NH priorities and help address staffing pressures and support for those providing frontline care.

300x250x1

“Working with our partners, we also opened an additional temporary location in Niagara Falls to test hospitality and tourism sector workers,” says Zeau Ismail, director of interprofessional practice, research and education; director lead at COVID-19 assessment centre and COVID, cold and flu care clinic. “Community health-care professionals, including family physicians, stepped up to work at these centres, in addition to a number of redeployed hospital staff and physicians.”

Niagara Health, along with partnering members of the Niagara Ontario Health Team-Équipe Santé Ontario Niagara (NOHT-ÉSON), operated five CCFCCs to test, assess and provide treatment for people with COVID-19 and other cold and flu-like illnesses. Since opening in 2022, the CCFCCs and Niagara Health’s clinical assessment centre have had more than 1,900 visits.

After March 31:

  •  If a person has symptoms of a respiratory illness, they are encouraged to call their primary care provider if they have one as the first option for guidance and care.
  •  If someone develops severe symptoms, they are urged to go to their nearest emergency department or call 9-1-1.

“We are incredibly grateful to our staff, physicians and partners, both on the frontlines and behind the scenes, who helped make the ACs and CCFCCs possible throughout our fight against COVID-19,” says Ismail.

***************************

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Decrease in COVID-19 in Prince Albert according to wastewater report

Published

 on

Graphic courtesy HFCM Communicatie, via Wikimedia This is a representation of what the Covid-19 virus would look like under a powerful microscope.

The USask Global Institute for Water Security wastewater survey for Prince Albert shows that the COVID-19 viral RNA load in Prince Albert’s has decreased by 46.5 per cent.

This was after there was a single decrease in last week’s report.

The number is based on averages of three individual daily measurements in this reporting period up to May 22 which are then compared to the weekly average of the previous week.

This week’s viral load of approximately 10,000 gene copies / 100 mL SARS-CoV-2 is the 85th-highest value observed during the pandemic.

300x250x1

This concentration of viral particles is considered Low because it is below the range and regarded as low in Prince Albert.

This week’s viral RNA load indicates that the SARS-CoV-2 infections in Prince Albert are reducing.

Whole genome sequencing confirmed the presence of BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BQ.1.1.4, BQ.1.18, XBB.1.5, BA.5.2.1 and BE.1.1 in earlier samples; which have S:Y144del, S:R346T, S:K444T, S:N460K mutations associated with immune escape. In addition, the sequences of the most recently collected sample relative to the previously collected samples indicate the level of presence of BA.2 and BA.5 in Prince Albert’s wastewater to be 94 per cent and 78 per cent stable respectively.

All data has been shared with Saskatchewan health authorities.

USask and Global Water Futures researchers are using wastewater-based epidemiology to monitor for SARS-CoV-2 (the virus causing COVID-19) in Saskatoon, Prince Albert and North Battleford wastewater, providing early warning of infection outbreaks. This work is being done in partnership with the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Public Health Agency of Canada, City of Saskatoon, City of Prince Albert and City of North Battleford.

This variant tracking data should be seen merely as an indicator of trends which need to be verified using sequencing technology through the Public Health Agency of Canada. Because individuals are at varying stages of infection when shedding the virus, the variant levels detected in sewage are not necessarily directly comparable to the proportion of variant cases found in individual swab samples confirmed through provincial genetic sequencing efforts.

editorial@paherald.sk.ca

 

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Just when we were starting to see COVID and RSV rates drop this spring, another type of virus contributed to a spike in respiratory infections

Published

 on

Josep Suria/Shutterstock
  • Human metapneumovirus spiked this spring as cases of COVID and RSV fell.
  • According to the CDC, 19.6% of antigen tests and nearly 11% of PCR tests for HMPV, were positive in the US in early March.
  • Symptoms of HMPV include cough, fever, nasal congestion, and shortness of breath.

Cases of another type of respiratory virus have spiked this spring, just as COVID-19 and RSV rates were finally falling in the US.

According to the CDC, 19.6% of antigen tests and nearly 11% of PCR tests for human metapneumovirus, or HMPV, were positive in the US in early March.

The nearly 11% of positive PCR cases is up 36% since before the COVID-19 pandemic when PCR tests for HMPV were coming back with a rate of 7% positivity, according to the CDC.

In contrast, COVID-19 cases were down nearly 30% at the beginning of March, according to the World Health Organization, and the number of people being hospitalized for RSV was down to 1.2 people per 100,000 in March from 4.5 people per 100,000 in January, according to the CDC.

300x250x1

Symptoms of HMPV include cough, fever, nasal congestion, and shortness of breath, according to the CDC. The symptoms could progress into bronchitis, pneumonia, or other similar viruses that cause upper and lower respiratory infections.

The CDC said some might be sicker for longer than others, and the duration of the virus depends on the severity, but for the most part, is similar in length to other respiratory infections caused by viruses.

The virus is spread by coughs and sneezes, close personal contact, and touching surfaces infected with the virus, then touching the mouth, nose, or eyes.

According to CNN, there’s no vaccine for HMPV, nor is there an antiviral drug to treat it.

 

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Just when we were starting to see COVID and RSV rates drop this spring, another type of virus contributed to a spike in respiratory infections

Published

 on

Josep Suria/Shutterstock
  • Human metapneumovirus spiked this spring as cases of COVID and RSV fell.
  • According to the CDC, 19.6% of antigen tests and nearly 11% of PCR tests for HMPV, were positive in the US in early March.
  • Symptoms of HMPV include cough, fever, nasal congestion, and shortness of breath.

Cases of another type of respiratory virus have spiked this spring, just as COVID-19 and RSV rates were finally falling in the US.

According to the CDC, 19.6% of antigen tests and nearly 11% of PCR tests for human metapneumovirus, or HMPV, were positive in the US in early March.

The nearly 11% of positive PCR cases is up 36% since before the COVID-19 pandemic when PCR tests for HMPV were coming back with a rate of 7% positivity, according to the CDC.

In contrast, COVID-19 cases were down nearly 30% at the beginning of March, according to the World Health Organization, and the number of people being hospitalized for RSV was down to 1.2 people per 100,000 in March from 4.5 people per 100,000 in January, according to the CDC.

300x250x1

Symptoms of HMPV include cough, fever, nasal congestion, and shortness of breath, according to the CDC. The symptoms could progress into bronchitis, pneumonia, or other similar viruses that cause upper and lower respiratory infections.

The CDC said some might be sicker for longer than others, and the duration of the virus depends on the severity, but for the most part, is similar in length to other respiratory infections caused by viruses.

The virus is spread by coughs and sneezes, close personal contact, and touching surfaces infected with the virus, then touching the mouth, nose, or eyes.

According to CNN, there’s no vaccine for HMPV, nor is there an antiviral drug to treat it.

Read the original article on Insider

 

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending