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No COVID-19 vaccination, no visit to BC senior care homes – Prince Rupert Northern View – The Northern View

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Opening up B.C. senior care homes to more visitors requires strict rules around full COVID-19 vaccination, and a testing and mask routine for any senior home employees who have not been immunized.

For fully vaccinated visitors, the rules are simple as of July 19: no more appointments necessary, wear a mask in common areas and family groups can visit together and hug their loved ones in their rooms without masks. Visitors who haven’t had two shots and 14 days to build their immunity will still be allowed in, but must wear masks, and all visitors will still be subject to screening to check vaccination status and any symptoms of illness before entering.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says every facility is expected to ensure that visiting hours extend to evenings and weekends, after care home residents went months with a single designated visitor or in some cases, no visitors allowed.

Henry says the “vast majority” of care home staff and residents have received two vaccinations, but the exact status of each won’t be known to public health authorities until the July 19 order requires them to report their vaccination history to employers. A shortage of care home workers means those without full immunization will still be allowed to work, but they will be required to wear masks and be subject to three rapid tests each week.

“Volunteers and personal service providers who generally work in long-term care will need to be fully vaccinated before they’ll be able to resume activities in care homes,” Henry said July 8.

RELATED: B.C. scientists urge better tracking of Delta variant

RELATED: Anti-vaccine B.C. doctor sues College of Physicians

On Friday, B.C. recorded its second straight day without a COVID-19 outbreak in long-term care, assisted living or independent living senior facilities, and the second day with no additional deaths from the coronavirus.

Public health teams recorded 45 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the 24 hours up to July 9. There are currently 661 active cases, up from 649 on Thursday, with 73 people in hospital, up one, and 19 in intensive care, the same as on Thursday.

By region, the new and active cases for July 9 are:

• eight new cases in Fraser Health, 170 active

• 14 new cases in Vancouver Coastal Health, 248 active

• 19 new cases in Interior Health, 181 active

• no new cases in Northern Health, 30 active

• four new cases in Island Health, 21 active


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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Peel Region reports its first confirmed case of monkeypox – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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Peel Region has its first confirmed case of monkeypox.

According to Peel Public Health, the person infected is an adult male in his 30s who lives in Mississauga.

The heath unit said the risk to the public remains low.

Monkeypox, which comes from the same virus family as smallpox, spreads though close contact with an infected individual. Most transmission happens through close contact with the skin lesions of monkeypox, but the virus can also be spread by large droplets or by sharing contaminated items.

To reduce risk of infection, people are advised to be cautious when engaging in intimate activities with others. Vaccination is available for high-risk contacts of cases and for those deemed at high risk of exposure to monkeypox.

Symptoms can include fever, headache, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash/lesions, which could appear on the face or genitals and then spread to other areas.

Anyone who develops these symptoms should contact their healthcare provider and avoid close contact with others until they have improved and rash/lesions have healed.

While most people recover on their own without treatment, those who have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for monkeypox should self-monitor for symptoms, and contact PPH to see if they are eligible for vaccination.

The Mississauga case is at least the 34th confirmed case of the disease in Ontario, with dozens more under investigation.

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Monkeypox case count rises to more than 3400 globally, WHO says – The Globe and Mail

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More than 3,400 confirmed monkeypox cases and one death were reported to the World Health Organization as of last Wednesday, with a majority of them from Europe, the agency said in an update on Monday.

WHO said that since June 17, 1,310 new cases were reported to the agency, with eight new countries reporting monkeypox cases.

Monkeypox is not yet a global health emergency, WHO ruled last week, although WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said he was deeply concerned about the outbreak.

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Sudbury news: Northern agencies highlight national HIV testing day | CTV News – CTV News Northern Ontario

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Monday was national HIV testing day. Officials say this year’s theme surrounds how getting tested is an act of self-care.

From clinics to self-testing kits, groups in the north say there are many options to get tested and everyone should use whichever way works best for them.

Just more than a year ago, Reseau Access Network in Sudbury teamed with Ready to Know and Get a Kit, groups that provide HIV self-testing kits at a pickup location.

Officials said it has been a huge success.

“We get a consistent number throughout each month and I can’t really divulge those figures, unfortunately, but as part of the overall study I can tell you the pickup of self-tests is a fraction of the amount of tests being ordered,” said Angel Riess, of Reseau Access Network.

“There’s actually a lot of tests being shipped to homes directly but I can confirm that they have been active and there’s a significant number of people who have chosen to engage in both programs.”

Elsewhere, the Aids Committee of North Bay and Area held a point-of-care testing clinic to mark the day.

“It’s an opportunity for us to remind everyone that getting tested is essential. If you don’t know you have HIV, you can’t take the steps to try to mitigate the possibility of spread,” said executive director Stacey Mayhall.

In addition to stopping the spread, knowing whether you are positive sooner rather than later can allow for a better quality of life.

“HIV is not a death sentence that it used to be,” said Riess.

“There have been advances in testing and medication and people can live long, healthy lives living with HIV.”

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