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No new cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia – HalifaxToday.ca

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MEDIA RELEASE
COMMUNICATIONS NOVA SCOTIA
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As of today, June 20, Nova Scotia has one active case of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

“As we head into the official start of summer with another straight day of no new cases of COVID-19, I want to congratulate the many graduates who are finding new ways to celebrate this year,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Please enjoy this important time with your friends and family responsibly. While we’ve been able to loosen restrictions, it is important that everyone remains vigilant about following the public health protocols.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 472 Nova Scotia tests on Friday, June 19 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 50,825 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths and one active COVID-19 case. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. One patient’s COVID-19 infection is considered resolved but they remain in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:
— fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
— cough or worsening of a previous cough
— sore throat
— headache
— shortness of breath
— muscle aches
— sneezing
— nasal congestion/runny nose
— hoarse voice
— diarrhea
— unusual fatigue
— loss of sense of smell or taste
— red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives – practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps and maintain a physical distance when and where required.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia .

Quick Facts:
— testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
— a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to June 28

Additional Resources:
Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada information line 1-833-784-4397 (toll-free)

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll-free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7 by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)

For help or information about domestic violence 24/7, call 1-855-225-0220 (toll-free)

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Why airlines won't contact you if a passenger with COVID-19 was on your flight – CTV News Winnipeg

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WINNIPEG —
The Manitoba government has explained why health officials are notifying airline passengers about possible COVID-19 exposure, and not the airlines themselves.

In recent days, the province has advised passengers on three Air Canada flights to self-isolate and monitor for symptoms, as a recent positive case was a passenger on the flights.

The flights are listed below:

  • AC 295 from Winnipeg to Vancouver on June 19. Affected rows are 19-25.
  • AC 122 from Vancouver to Toronto on June 21. Affected rows are 31-37.
  • AC 259 from Toronto to Winnipeg on June 23. Affected rows are 24-30.

Health officials said those in the impacted rows are considered close contacts and are asked to self-isolate for 14 days and monitor for COVID-19 symptoms. Any other passengers on the flights are asked to monitor for symptoms.

Since the pandemic started, the provincial government has maintained a list of flights where passengers with confirmed cases of COVID-19 were on.

However, some have wondered why provincial health officials are providing the updates, instead of the airlines.

CTV News Winnipeg reached out to the Manitoba government for additional information on the process.

A provincial spokesperson said the plan to post information on flights publicly, instead of requesting flight manifests, was established early in the pandemic.

“There is no direct evidence at this time that contacting individual air travellers has made it possible to find cases earlier,” the spokesperson said in an email to CTV News. “All air travellers should be self-monitoring for symptoms post-travel.”

The spokesperson went on to add, “Flight manifests take time to retrieve and often do not have contact information for all travellers that allows public health to follow-up. Airlines do not contact air travellers about public health issues directly.”

The province said the process is consistent with national guidelines and said most jurisdictions in Canada will publicly post the flight information for COVID-19 cases.

There have been 325 cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba since March 12.

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No new cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba for 4th straight day – CBC.ca

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No new cases of COVID-19 were announced in Manitoba on Saturday, marking the fourth straight day since a case of the illness was identified in the province.

The total number of cases identified in Manitoba is still 325, the province said on Twitter.

Numbers on testing, recoveries and hospitalizations will be updated again on Monday.

As of Friday, 16 of the known cases in the province were still active and no one was in hospital with COVID-19.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, seven people who contracted the illness caused by the new coronavirus in Manitoba have died and 302 have recovered.

As of Friday, the total number of COVID-19 tests done in the province was 64,968.

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Some experts are concerned about a coming influenza and COVID-19 collision – CTV News Montreal

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MONTREAL —
Quebec’s public health authorities are preparing now to avoid a potential catastrophe later when flu season hits particularly if there is no COVID-19 vaccine available.

Quebec’s Health Ministry has ordered 400 thousand more influenza vaccines for this fall’s public vaccination program than it did last year to try and increase vaccination rates among people at risk of complications and hospitalizations, according to a ministry spokesperson.

A total of two million doses will be available for those who meet the Quebec Immunization Committee’s criteria (see below for complete list).

That’s still a far cry from the universal coverage some had hoped for- especially during a pandemic.

Montreal infectious diseases specialist Dr. Matthew Oughton says offering a free vaccine to all Quebecers who want one would could help prevent the worst in Quebec if influenza season collides with COVID-19 outbreaks.

“If we can do anything that we can to reduce influenza disease that helps put us in a better position to deal with a subsequent second wave of COVID-19 that may come around the same time and we don’t want to get swamped by two waves.”

All provinces and territories offer a universal influenza vaccine with the exception of British Columbia, New Brunswick and Quebec.

Healthy people who catch influenza are not at increased risk of serious illness requiring hospitalization. However, the chief of infectious diseases at the Jewish General Hospital points out that every time we have a major outbreak of influenza in Quebec, the emergency rooms become overcrowded.

“So, imagine if we have the regular influenza season and on top of it we have a wave of Covid-19. It’s going to be a nightmare,” says Dr. Karl Weiss.

“The flu vaccine is not a great vaccine and won’t protect you one hundred percent,” Weiss adds, “but if you have everybody with the flu vaccine then you will lower the impact of the flu and you probably have a better handle on Covid-19.

An added benefit of offering the flu vaccine to everyone according to Dr. Oughton, who also works at the Jewish General, is that it would “maximize the accessibility of that very important and cost effective means of preventing vaccine preventable diseases…rather than having to work your way through the list of all indications and exceptions.”

For the last few years flu vaccines are also available and administered at many pharmacies across the province, at a cost of between $20 and $40 per visit, depending on the store.

Last year interested Quebec pharmacies purchased 200,000 doses of flu vaccine to sell to customers ineligible for the public plan from the Quebec Association of Pharmacy Distributors, according to its spokesperson, Hughes Mousseau,

Mousseau doesn’t know yet if pharmacies ordered more vaccines for the upcoming flu season than last year because the orders were still coming in, but he says if any want to up their stock afterwards he may not be able to fulfill the order, with such a limited supply.

The distributors, just like the provinces, have to order the vaccine from the manufacturers a year in advance because producing the vaccine takes months.

“We did factor in an increase because we saw there was a 10 per cent to 40 per cent increased demand for the vaccine in Australia and New Zealand,” Mousseau explained.

The flu season in Australia is underway right now and is being closely monitored to get a sense of what’s to come in North America. 

On a positive note, Dr. Gaston De Serre from Quebec’s National Public Health Institute told CTV, the “current surveillance data show influenza and influenza-like illness indicators are all lower than usual. The speculation is that COVID-19 related distancing measures and mask wearing may be helping prevent influenza as well as the coronavirus.

De Serre said that’s a good incentive for Quebecers to stick with public health practices here, throughout fall and winter.

The following are covered for a flu vaccine in Quebec in 2020-2021:

  • children aged 6 months – 17 months with certain chronic illnesses
  • adults with certain chronic illnesses (including pregnant women at any stage of their pregnancy)
  • pregnant women in their 2nd and 3rd trimester
  • seniors aged 75 years and older
  • those who live with a baby under 6 months of age, or with a person who has an increased risk of hospitalization or death, or who are caregivers
  • health care workers

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