Connect with us

Health

Nova Scotia marks 12 days of no new COVID-19 cases – HalifaxToday.ca

Published

on


On Sunday, June 21, 2020 the provincial data website indicates there are no new cases of COVID-19.

There have been a total of 1,061 cases in the province since March, and there is currently only one active case remaining. There have been a total of 62 deaths.

One patient remains in hospital and one other in the ICU, although one of those patients is considered to have recovered from the virus.


MEDIA RELEASE
COMMUNICATIONS NOVA SCOTIA
***************

As of today, June 21, Nova Scotia has one active case of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

“I hope Nova Scotians were able to reconnect with their loved ones and enjoy the outdoors this weekend,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Thank you to all Nova Scotians for their hard work – it has not been easy, but our efforts are paying off. Please continue to be safe and follow public health advice.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 281 Nova Scotia tests on Saturday, June 20 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 51,111 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths and one active COVID-19 case. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. One patient’s COVID-19 infection is considered resolved but they remain in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:
— fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
— cough or worsening of a previous cough
— sore throat
— headache
— shortness of breath
— muscle aches
— sneezing
— nasal congestion/runny nose
— hoarse voice
— diarrhea
— unusual fatigue
— loss of sense of smell or taste
— red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives – practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps and maintain a physical distance when and where required.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia .

Quick Facts:
— testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
— a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to June 28

Additional Resources:
Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada information line 1-833-784-4397 (toll-free)

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll-free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7 by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)

For help or information about domestic violence 24/7, call 1-855-225-0220 (toll-free)

***************

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

St. Catharines adopts mandatory mask bylaw for COVID-19 – StCatharinesStandard.ca

Published

on


St. Catharines has become the first Niagara municipality to enact a mandatory mask bylaw for indoor public spaces from elevators to bingo halls in an effort to curb COVID-19.

Councillors questioned Niagara’s acting medical officer of health Mustafa Hirji at length about the effectiveness of masks before voting unanimously Monday night to adopt a draft bylaw that affects most people over the age of 10.

Mayor Walter Sendzik said the city doesn’t want to be a community that has to go backwards into lockdown because COVID-19 complacency set in.

“If this keeps us moving forward and not having to step back into Stage 2 or 1 when we get out of Stage 2, I think that will be for the benefit of everybody,” said Sendzik, adding he understands the frustrations of those opposed to the bylaw.

“These are difficult decisions. We’ve all got the influx of emails and text messages and phone calls and everything else associated with it, but at the end of the day we all want to do what’s best for our community long term.”

The start date of the bylaw will be determined by the city’s CAO and mayor in consultation with the acting medical officer of health.

CAO Shelley Chemnitz said she’ll be meeting with Hirji to determine what the metrics will be to choose a date. The city’s communications staff and senior staff will work on a public education campaign and signage to support businesses and operators.

“It’s not that we have to come down hard on people for not doing things, but rather that we’re working together with them to all be successful,” she said.

Sendzik said realistically, the bylaw could be put into effect Tuesday if they want, but the education piece might take two or three weeks to fully implement in the community.

The bylaw adopted isn’t relying on mask police.

City solicitor Heather Salter said the enforcement is effectively through education and voluntary compliance. Business operators are required to have a policy in place but they are not required to enforce the policy or to prohibit entry. They are empowered by the bylaw to do so.

“This is the least restrictive type of bylaw. It doesn’t require the business operator to have somebody at the door who’s going to challenge people coming in without a mask,” she said.

“It really is a voluntary compliance situation with respect to the individuals.”

Other areas that have the same type of bylaw or rules directed at operators include Toronto, York, Ottawa and Simcoe-Muskoka.

Places like Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph and Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington have a similar rule but require operators to prohibit people from entering without masks.

The St. Catharines bylaw exempts people with medical conditions that inhibit their ability to wear a mask, people unable to apply or remove a mask without assistance, people who have protections under the human rights code that would prevent them from wearing a mask and people accommodating someone with a hearing disability.

Children 10 and under will be exempt, after a request by Merritton Coun. Lori Littleton that the age be raised from the draft bylaw’s age of two.

Individuals who claim an exemption are not required to provide proof of the exemption to protect their privacy.

Get more from the St. Catharines Standard in your inbox

Never miss the latest news from the St. Catharines Standard. Sign up for our email newsletters to get the day’s top stories, your favourite columnists, and much more in your inbox.

Sign Up Now

The rules affect any indoor place where the public gathers, including grocery stores, shopping malls, places of worship, libraries, bingo halls, hotel common areas and city-owned facilities, among others.

It does not include day cares, schools, public transportation, hospitals and health facilities and provincial and federal government buildings.

The bylaw states that anyone who contravenes any provision of the bylaw is guilty of an offence and upon conviction is libel to a fine, and other penalties in the provincial offences act.

St. Catharines held a special meeting of council on July 6 and directed staff to draft the temporary bylaw and request that Hirji attend Monday’s meeting.

Hirji has not issued a region-wide order to wear masks like some other Ontario public health heads have done, instead saying it is up to the politicians to make those type of rules.

He told councillors Monday that the research up until March said masks didn’t work, but that was based on influenza-like illnesses, not on COVID-19. Over the last three months or so, he said there has been research saying that unlike other respiratory viruses, face coverings may have an impact with COVID-19.

Hirji said most public health expert bodies are now recommending people wear face coverings when physical distancing is not possible.

When asked why council should introduce a bylaw now — Niagara is only seeing about two new cases of COVID-19 a day — Hirji said the province is starting to lift the restrictions in society that forced people to have distance from each other.

“The impetus for keeping ourselves safe from COVID-19 is more and more falling in our own personal responsibility,” he said, adding people need to be more vigilant than ever about keeping physical distance, washing hands, wearing face coverings when distance can’t be kept and getting tested if they have symptoms.

How long St. Catharines will keep a mask bylaw in place isn’t known.

Hirji said the only logical time to back off wearing face coverings is if there’s new research showing it’s not as effective as previously thought or there comes a point where there’s an effective vaccine.

“What we’re really trying to do is set a new social norm here that we’re going to live with for a year or two years, perhaps longer, hopefully not.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

St. Catharines Council passes mandatory mask bylaw for enclosed public spaces – Newstalk 610 CKTB (iHeartRadio)

Published

on


St. Catharines council has passed a bylaw making it mandatory to wear a mask in enclosed spaces where physical distancing is not possible.

The bylaw passed unanimously after a lengthy discussion with Niagara Region’s Acting Medical Officer of Health Dr. Mustafa Hirji, where Hirji explained the science behind how masks can help prevent the spread of COVID-19 when physical distancing is impossible.

When asked how the bylaw will be enforced, the city says it is up to individual businesses to enforce the policy, or choose not to.

From the bylaw:

These measures are directed at the
operators of enclosed public spaces who are required to adopt a policy that prohibits
persons to enter or otherwise remain in the enclosed public space unless that person is
wearing a mask, subject to exemptions for specific individuals.
The operator is not required to enforce the policy or to refuse entry to anyone without a
mask; however, they are empowered by the bylaw to do so. Without a bylaw in place
some private businesses have already implemented some form of mask policy for their
establishments. 

Businesses will also be required to provide hand sanitizer to customers upon entry. 

Children under 10 will not be required to wear a mask.

You can read the bylaw on the city’s website, or by clicking here.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Kelowna’s mayor responds to COVID-19 cluster outbreak – Globalnews.ca

Published

on


Kelowna’s mayor is reminding people to physically distance and take other necessary precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 after 13 cases have been connected to a city’s cluster.

“The province has not implemented travel restrictions within Canada, so we know people are going to come to Kelowna,” Kelowna mayor Colin Basran said in a statement.

Read more:
B.C. reports 62 COVID-19 cases, 2 deaths over three days

However, he also noted that B.C.’s top doctor has asked people to use their travel manners and respect physical distancing rules and proper hygiene orders.

“Knowing that people are going to come to Kelowna on vacation, the city has helped local businesses comply with public health orders and WorkSafe BC requirements by expanding commercial space onto sidewalks and streets in business centres so that safe physical distancing can be maintained,” Basran said.

Story continues below advertisement

Read more:
Kelowna COVID-19 outbreaks linked to hotel parties: B.C. health minister

Bylaw officers and RCMP bike patrols are also visiting parks and beaches to educate people about physical distancing, he added.

Basran also noted provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has said that outdoor activities with adequate physical distancing are permitted.

Read more:
‘Mini-ceremonies’ offered at Okanagan wineries in wake of cancelled weddings

“She has also said that if people can’t maintain the level of responsibility that helped us have one of the best responses to limit COVID transmission in North America, then we may need to go back to the Phase 2 level of public health orders,” Basran warned.

“We need to remain vigilant, because we’ve seen how quickly a few lapses in judgment can turn into a serious problem.

“It’s my hope that with everyone doing their part, we all can enjoy Kelowna and the Okanagan Valley — just two metres apart,” he said.






2:43
Kelowna businesses react after locations identified as possible COVID-19 exposure sites


Kelowna businesses react after locations identified as possible COVID-19 exposure sites

Story continues below advertisement

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending