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One new COVID-19 death in Ottawa on Thursday – CTV News Ottawa

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OTTAWA —
One more person has died from COVID-19 in Ottawa, the city’s public health unit reported Thursday.

Ottawa Public Health has recorded 13 deaths from COVID-19 this month. That makes November the deadliest month for COVID in the capital since June, when 14 deaths were recorded.

A total of 617 Ottawa residents have died from COVID-19.

OPH reported 42 new infections on Thursday. It’s the city’s highest case count since Sunday, when Ottawa Public Health recorded 55 new cases of the virus.

There were 32 new cases on Wednesday and 31 on Tuesday.

The number of active cases is holding steady just above 300. There are 13 patients in hospital with COVID-19, none of whom are in the ICU.

Provincewide, Ontario health officials reported 748 new cases, a significant increase from the 591 reported Wednesday.

The province’s rolling seven-day average is now 692, up from 625 at this time last week.

OTTAWA’S KEY COVID-19 STATISTICS

  • COVID-19 cases per 100,000 (Nov. 16 to Nov. 22): 23.0 (down from 24.6)        
  • Positivity rate in Ottawa (Nov. 17 to Nov. 23): 1.6 per cent (down from 1.8 per cent)
  • Reproduction number (Seven day average): 0.82 (up from 0.74) 

Reproduction values greater than 1 indicate the virus is spreading and each case infects more than one contact. If it is less than 1, it means spread is slowing.

UNVACCINATED CASES

Of the 257 Ontario residents in hospital with COVID-19, 212 are not fully vaccinated or have an unknown vaccination status. Forty-five are fully vaccinated.

There are 137 people in Ontario ICUs with COVID-19. Of those, 127 are not fully vaccinated or have an unknown vaccination status. Ten patients are considered fully vaccinated.

COVID-19 VACCINES IN OTTAWA

Ottawa Public Health updates vaccine numbers on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

As of Wednesday:

  • Ottawa residents with 1 dose (12+): 838,873 (+474) 
  • Ottawa residents with 2 doses (12+): 810,596 (+883)
  • Share of population 12 and older with at least one dose: 91 per cent
  • Share of population 12 and older fully vaccinated: 88 per cent

*Statistics on Ottawa residents with one or two doses include anyone with an Ottawa postal code who was vaccinated anywhere in Ontario. 

ACTIVE CASES OF COVID-19 IN OTTAWA

There are 304 active cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa on Thursday, up from 303 on Wednesday.

Ottawa Public Health reported 40 more newly resolved cases of COVID-19. The total number of resolved cases of coronavirus in Ottawa is 30,869.

The number of active cases is the number of total laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 minus the numbers of resolved cases and deaths. A case is considered resolved 14 days after known symptom onset or positive test result.

HOSPITALIZATIONS IN OTTAWA

There are 13 people in Ottawa area hospitals with COVID-19 related illnesses on Thursday, down from 14 on Wednesday.

There are zero patients in ICU.

Age categories of people in hospital:

  • 0-9: 0
  • 10-19: 0
  • 20-29: 0
  • 30-39: 0
  • 40-49: 3
  • 50-59: 0
  • 60-69: 2
  • 70-79: 5
  • 80-89: 2
  • 90+: 1

(Ottawa Public Health is now reporting people in hospital with an “active” infection)

COVID-19 CASES IN OTTAWA BY AGE CATEGORY

  • 0-9 years old: 10 new cases (3,066 total cases)
  • 10-19 years-old: Six new cases (4,246 total cases)
  • 20-29 years-old: Seven new cases (7,050 total cases)
  • 30-39 years-old: Eight new cases (4,864 total cases)
  • 40-49 years-old: Two new cases (4,159 total cases)
  • 50-59 years-old: Seven new cases (3,627 total cases)
  • 60-69-years-old: Two new cases (2,145 total cases)
  • 70-79 years-old: One new case (1,180 total cases)
  • 80-89 years-old: Zero new cases (900 total cases)
  • 90+ years old: Zero new cases (550 total cases)
  • Unknown: Zero new cases (4 cases total)

VARIANTS OF CONCERN

Ottawa Public Health data:

  • Total Alpha (B.1.1.7) cases: 6,850
  • Total Beta (B.1.351) cases: 513
  • Total Gamma (P.1) cases: 55
  • Total Delta (B.1.617.2) cases: 1,086
  • Total variants of concern/mutation cases: 12,176
  • Deaths linked to variants/mutations: 120

*OPH notes that that VOC and mutation trends must be treated with caution due to the varying time required to complete VOC testing and/or genomic analysis following the initial positive test for SARS-CoV-2. Test results may be completed in batches and data corrections or updates can result in changes to case counts that may differ from past reports.

COVID-19 TESTING IN OTTAWA

The Ottawa COVID-19 Testing Taskforce says 2,403 swabs processed at assessment centres in Ottawa on Tuesday. A total of 3,763 lab tests were performed.

The average turnaround time from the time the swab is taken at a testing site to the result is 23 hours.

CASES OF COVID-19 AROUND THE REGION

  • Eastern Ontario Health Unit: 13 new cases
  • Hastings Prince Edward Public Health: 24 new cases
  • Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington Public Health: 35 new cases
  • Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit: Seven new cases
  • Renfrew County and District Health Unit: Seven new cases

COVID-19 OUTBREAKS

Ottawa Public Health reports COVID-19 outbreaks at institutions and community outbreaks in Ottawa.

Community outbreaks:

  • Workplace – Services: One outbreak

Schools and childcare spaces currently experiencing outbreaks: 

  1. École élémentaire publique Marie-Curie (Nov. 5) 
  2. Holy Family Elementary School (Nov. 7)
  3. Assumption Catholic elementary school (Nov. 8)
  4. Our Lady of Fatima elementary school (Nov. 9) 
  5. Ecole élémentaire catholique La Vérendrye (Nov. 10)
  6. Ecole élémentaire catholique Sainte-Bernadette (Nov. 11) 
  7. Sir Winston Churchill Public School (Nov. 13) 
  8. Stittsville Public School (Nov. 13)
  9. Westwind Public School (Nov. 15)
  10. Académie Providence Soeurs Antonines (Nov. 16)
  11. Hilson Avenue Public School (Nov. 16)
  12. Holy Spirit Elementary School (Nov. 16)
  13. École élémentaire publique Francojeunesse (Nov. 17)
  14. Carlington Recreation Centre – Licenced Childcare Centre (Nov. 17)
  15. A. Lorne Cassidy Elementary School (Nov. 18)
  16. Fern Hill School (Nov. 19)
  17. Chesterton Academy (Nov. 21)
  18. St. Rita Elementary School (Nov. 21)
  19. École élémentaire catholique d’enseignment personnalisé Lamoureux (Nov. 21)
  20. Pinecrest Public School (Nov. 21)
  21. Carson Grove Elementary School (Nov. 22)
  22. Chapel Hill Catholic School (Nov. 23) NEW

Healthcare and congregate settings experiencing outbreaks:

  1. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – A2 Unit (Oct. 26)
  2. Shelter (Oct. 26) 
  3. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – A4/A5/B5/AMA/Medicine units (Oct. 28)
  4. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – A3 Unit (Oct. 29)
  5. Supported Independent Living (A-24018) (Nov. 2)
  6. Portobello Retirement Residence (Nov. 3)
  7. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – Unit A1 (Nov. 4) 
  8. The Ottawa Hospital General Campus – 8 West (Nov. 8)
  9. The Ottawa Hospital General Campus – 6 West (Nov. 10)
  10. Rooming House (Nov. 12)
  11. Chapel Hill Retirement Residence – 3rd floor (Nov. 13)
  12. St. Patrick’s Home – Waterford Unit, Floor 5 (Nov. 17)
  13. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – Unit B2 (Nov. 19)

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COVID-19 immunization clinics open to B.C. kids ages five to 11 today – Toronto Star

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VICTORIA – Children in British Columbia between five and 11 years old can start getting shots of a pediatric COVID-19 vaccine today.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said last week that about 350,000 children are eligible to receive the modified dose of the Health Canada-approved Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

Health Canada approved the pediatric shot for use in Canada after an independent scientific review confirmed the first vaccine formulated for younger children is safe and effective.

Henry says the same vaccine has been administered to more than three million children in the United States and there have been no “safety signals” as a result.

She says the vaccine will help children and families safely return to activities that benefit physical and mental health.

Dr. Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s vaccination drive, has said she expects the full children’s immunization effort including second doses to conclude by the end of January.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 29, 2021.

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COVID-19 immunization clinics open to B.C. kids ages five to 11 today – Times Colonist

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VICTORIA — Children in British Columbia between five and 11 years old can start getting shots of a pediatric COVID-19 vaccine today. 

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said last week that about 350,000 children are eligible to receive the modified dose of the Health Canada-approved Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

Health Canada approved the pediatric shot for use in Canada after an independent scientific review confirmed the first vaccine formulated for younger children is safe and effective. 

Henry says the same vaccine has been administered to more than three million children in the United States and there have been no “safety signals” as a result.

She says the vaccine will help children and families safely return to activities that benefit physical and mental health.

Dr. Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s vaccination drive, has said she expects the full children’s immunization effort including second doses to conclude by the end of January.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 29, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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COVID-19: Children between five and 11 are eligible for vaccinations starting Monday – Vancouver Sun

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Health Canada approved the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 on Nov. 19. This vaccine uses a lower dose of 10 micrograms — one-third of the dose given to older children and adults

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Children in B.C. between five and 11 years old start receiving the first doses of their COVID-19 vaccines on Monday.

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More than 90,000 out of the 350,000 eligible children, or 26 per cent, in that age category were registered a week before the rollout, according to the B.C. government.

The government’s own surveys show that most parents support getting vaccines for their young children, but there are some whose views might keep the vaccination rate lower for this age category.

Of B.C. parents who responded, 58 per cent will register to vaccinate their children right away, while another 18 per cent planned to wait, and nearly 25 per cent said they are not sure they will do it, according to Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s immunization efforts.

A parent or legal guardian has to give verbal consent ahead of a child being vaccinated, according to Ballem.

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Health Canada approved the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 on Nov. 19. This vaccine uses a lower dose of 10 micrograms that is one-third of the dose given to older children and adults.

COVID-19 information from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control from Nov. 25 shows that 80 per cent of British Columbians at the next age group up, aged 12 to 17, are now fully vaccinated and more than 87 per cent have a first dose.

There are varying rates in different health authorities, however. In Fraser, Vancouver Coastal and Vancouver Island, it is higher at 82 per cent, 89 per cent and 83 per cent, respectively. In Interior, it was 70 per cent and in Northern, it was 59 per cent.

Within authorities, there is also a wide spectrum. As of Nov. 23, Enderby and Kettle Creek in the Interior authority had only 38 per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds double vaccinated, while Kimberley posted 80 per cent. In Vancouver Coastal, Bella Coola Valley had 59 per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds double vaccinated, while North Vancouver was at 93 per cent.

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Between Oct. 27 to Nov. 25, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people among the double vaccinated for this 12 to 17 age group across B.C. was 2.5. Among those who had one vaccination, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people was 8.2. And for the unvaccinated, the figure was 46.8 per 100,000.

For that same period, in the category of 0-11 year olds, who are all unvaccinated, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people was 16.8.

“I think the most important thing is that vaccinations be readily available for all children and families,” said Teri Mooring, president of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation.

“For families where it’s not convenient for them to book an appointment in a separate clinic or perhaps they work long hours or there are other various individual circumstances, we think there should be an option (for COVID-19 vaccination) in schools as well.”

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Mooring said that “it was a concern with the 12- to 17-year-olds as well and what we’re seeing in some parts of the province, where we have vaccine hesitancy, we are still those (vaccination) numbers lag behind. We don’t want that to be the case for the five to 11-year-olds.”

Youth aged 12 to 18 have to carry a B.C. Vaccine card, or have a trusted adult carry one for them, to go to restaurants and attend indoor, organized events. Unlike adults, they don’t have to also show government-issued identification. Children aged five to 11 are not be required to show proof of vaccination.

jlee-young@postmedia.com

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