adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Media

Opinion: Bell Media's big bet on FIFA World Cup comes at a cost – The Globe and Mail

Published

 on


Construction workers take a break to watch World Cup soccer action between Italy and Paraguay on a public video screen in Toronto on June 14, 2010.Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press

Back in 2011, when Bell Media beat out CBC/Radio-Canada for the broadcasting rights to the FIFA World Cup, the odds of a Canadian team qualifying for the 2022 edition of soccer’s premier tournament were not so strong.

After all, Canada had not participated in a men’s World Cup since 1986. But surging interest in soccer here persuaded BCE Inc.’s media unit that it was worth outbidding the public broadcaster, which had held the rights to FIFA events for several years.

That turns out to have been a smart move. Soccer madness has skyrocketed in the country since then. And with revved-up Canadian fans salivating at the prospect of finally watching a homegrown team vie for the cup, Bell Media’s pricey bet now appears set to pay off – big time.

300x250x1

The fickle fan’s guide to Qatar 2022

Seven of the world’s best soccer players to watch in the 2022 World Cup

“Advanced advertising for the upcoming FIFA World Cup is exceeding our expectations with revenues already up 50 per cent from the 2018 World Cup,” BCE chief financial officer Glen LeBlanc boasted on a Nov. 3 conference call with analysts. “This success is a testament to the massive popularity and value advertisers place on premium sporting events.”

It is also a testimony to the willingness of sponsors and broadcasters alike to put profits before principles – at least for as long as they can get away with it.

This year’s World Cup has been steeped in controversy from the moment FIFA chose Qatar as its host country in 2010. Soccer’s governing body has been beset by a series of corruption scandals, casting doubt on the process that led to its choice of the Persian Gulf emirate in the first place.

Human-rights groups have denounced the treatment of migrant workers Qatar brought in to build the infrastructure to accommodate more than a million visitors during the month-long World Cup. A Guardian investigation last year found that more than 6,500 migrant workers died in the country between 2011 and 2020, amid widespread reports of unsafe working conditions on World Cup-related construction projects.

The emirate’s ban on homosexuality and its egregious record on women’s rights have raised concerns, too. Calls for a boycott have proliferated, especially in Europe, where several major cities (including Paris and Berlin) have refused to organize World Cup viewing parties for their soccer-mad citizens, as they did in the past. Many bars are also refusing to screen games.

How has Bell Media reacted to all the controversy? So far, by ignoring it.

It has, however, launched a glitzy advertising campaign to promote World Cup coverage on TSN and its French-language sports network, RDS. It even commissioned a theme song (a version of The Beatles hit, Come Together) to “further ignite Canadians’ excitement for this event.”

Forgive us if we don’t exactly feel the urge to sing along.

To be fair, Bell Media is hardly the only broadcaster to put its bottom line first, human rights be damned. After all, Canada’s diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics over China’s human-rights abuses did not stop the CBC from milking the event for financial gain. The public broadcaster even boasted in latest annual report that advertising revenues from the games “proved more robust than expected.”

Canadian World Cup viewers will not be entirely free from being exposed to the event’s unseemly side.

“Within TSN’s coverage, CTV News will provide on-site reports focused on significant news stories surrounding the tournament, including human rights issues,” Bell Media said in an e-mailed response to questions about its coverage.

Still, who’s kidding whom? Bell Media is not going to jeopardize its investment in the World Cup by encouraging viewers to feel morally conflicted about the event. Not when this World Cup is shaping up to be its most lucrative yet.

While the Super Bowl is usually the single most-watched sports event every year – the 2022 edition drew an average audience of 8.1 million viewers on CTV, TSN and RDS – it lasts only a few hours. The World Cup stretches over four weeks and 64 games.

In 2018, Bell Media said World Cup games broadcast on CTV, TSN and RDS drew a total of 25.8 million viewers. Bell Media should easily surpass viewership numbers from four years ago. Should Canada advance beyond the first round of the tournament, there is no telling how much money the broadcaster could make.

After 36 years without a Canadian team in the World Cup, no one can begrudge fans their enthusiasm. But no one should forget on whose backs Bell Media is profiting, either.

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Why social media makes you feel bad

Published

 on

Have you ever found yourself scrolling through social media and noticed you felt a bit down? Maybe a little envious? Why aren’t you on a yacht? Running a startup? Looking amazing 24/7?

The good news is you are not alone. Although social media has some benefits, it can also make us feel a little depressed.

Why does social media make us feel bad?

As humans we inherently compare ourselves to others to determine our self-worth. Psychologists call this social comparison theory.

We primarily make two types of comparisons: upward and downward comparisons.

300x250x1

Upward comparisons occur when we compare ourselves to someone else (in real life or on social media) and feel they are better than us (an unfavourable comparison for us) in whatever domain we are assessing (such as status, beauty, abilities, success, and so on).

For example, comparing your day at work to your friend’s post from the ski fields (we’re looking at you Dave!) is likely to be an upward comparison. Another example is making appearance comparisons which can make you feel worse about yourself or your looks .

Although upward comparison can sometimes motivate you to do better, this depends on the change being achievable and on your esteem. Research suggests upward comparisons may be particularly damaging if you have low self-esteem.

In contrast, downward comparisons occur when we view ourselves more favourably than the other person – for example, by comparing yourself to someone less fortunate. Downward comparisons make us feel better about ourselves but are rare in social media because people don’t tend to post about the mundane realities of life.

 

Comparisons in social media

Social media showcases the best of people’s lives. It presents a carefully curated version of reality and presents it as fact. Sometimes, as with influencers, this is intentional but often it is unconscious bias. We are just naturally more likely to post when we are happy, on holiday or to share successes – and even then we choose the best version to share.

When we compare ourselves to what we see on social media, we typically make upward comparisons which make us feel worse. We compare ourselves on an average day to others on their best day. In fact, it’s not even their best day. It’s often a perfectly curated, photoshopped, produced, filter-applied moment. It’s not a fair comparison.

That’s not to say social media is all bad. It can help people feel supportedconnected, and get information. So don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Instead, keep your social media use in check with these tips.

 

Concrete ways you can make yourself feel better about social media

Monitor your reactions. If social media is enjoyable, you may not need to change anything – but if it’s making you exhausted, depressed or anxious, or you are losing time to mindless scrolling, it’s time for change.

Avoid comparisons. Remind yourself that comparing your reality with a selected moment on social media is an unrealistic benchmark. This is especially the case with high-profile accounts who are paid to create perfect content.

Be selective. If you must compare, search for downward comparisons (with those who are worse off) or more equal comparisons to help you feel better. This might include unfollowing celebrities, focusing on real posts by friends, or using reality focused platforms like BeReal.

Redefine success. Influencers and celebrities make luxury seem like the norm. Most people don’t live in pristine homes and sip barista-made coffee in white sheets looking perfect. Consider what real success means to you and measure yourself against that instead.

Practise gratitude. Remind yourself of things that are great in your life, and celebrate your accomplishments (big and small!). Create a “happy me” folder of your favourite life moments, pics with friends, and great pictures of yourself, and look at this if you find yourself falling into the comparison trap.

Unplug. If needed, take a break, or cut down. Avoid mindless scrolling by moving tempting apps to the last page of your phone or use in-built focus features on your device. Alternatively, use an app to temporarily block yourself from social media.

Engage in real life. Sometimes social media makes people notice what is missing in their own lives, which can encourage growth. Get out with friends, start a new hobby, embrace life away from the screen.

Get amongst nature. Nature has health and mood benefits that combat screen time.

Be the change. Avoid only sharing the picture-perfect version of your life and share (in a safe setting) your real life. You’d be surprised how this will resonate with others. This will help you and them feel better.

Seek help. If you are feeling depressed or anxious over a period of time, get support. Talk to your friends, family or a GP about how you are feeling. Alternatively contact one of the support lines like LifelineKids Helpline, or 13Yarn.

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Social Media Buzz: Mt. Washington, Balloon, Adani, Kyrie Irving – Bloomberg

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Social Media Buzz: Mt. Washington, Balloon, Adani, Kyrie Irving  Bloomberg

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Canada adds Russian media personalities, companies in latest round of sanctions – CP24

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

  1. Canada adds Russian media personalities, companies in latest round of sanctions  CP24
  2. Canada adds Russian media personalities, companies in latest round of sanctions  Halifax.CityNews.ca

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending