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Outdoor Art, Summer 2021 – The New York Times

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All in very different but concrete ways, these artists’ “live” public works speak of healing, history, and a fragile material world.

In post-lockdown New York, art has busted free from months of digital quarantine. Museums are open; objects are present, and people are pouring in — or at least queuing up for admission. The entrance line at the Met last weekend stretched across the plaza, and forward motion was slow. So, if you’re in need of a “live” art-fix fast — like, right now — you might consider another option: a self-guided tour of new outdoor art across town.

Much of this work was planned well before the pandemic. The originating idea for Maya Lin’s new installation, “Ghost Forest,” a cathedral-like grove of dead and dying trees at the center of a midtown Manhattan park, dates back some eight years. Similarly, David Hammons’s “Day’s End,” a wiry riverside monument to the just-pre-AIDS New York of the 1970s, began as a pencil sketch sent to the Whitney Museum in 2014.

“Maya Lin: Ghost Forest” at Madison Square Park. White cedars from the Pine Barrens, a habitat infiltrated by salt water as a result of climate change,  talk back. 
Madeline Cass for The New York Times
Simbarashe Cha for The New York Times

Neither piece is “political,” in an out-loud way. But after the layered traumas that have slammed this country over the past year and a half — killer plague, racist violence, California on fire — they can’t help but read that way. This is true of several other new outdoor works — by Sanford Biggers, Christian Boltanski, Melvin Edwards, Rashid Johnson, Guadalupe Maravilla and Mary Mattingly — described inside by Martha Schwendener. All in very different but concrete ways speak of healing, history, and a fragile material world.

And for those deeply addicted to digital, there’s something vital too, as Arthur Lubow reports: The High Line and the Shed have collaborated on a line of virtual projects experienced entirely on a smartphone app picked up on site — outdoors. (Continued on page tk)

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Sustainability, green energy, and world class visual art all meet in new art gallery building – Terrace Standard – Terrace Standard

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A new building that will connect sustainable energy and world class visual art has just been announced and is set to open in 2027.

Made public by minister of Canadian heritage Pablo Rodriguez and long-standing MP Hedy Fry, the centre will receive $29 million in funding through the federal government and Infrastructure Canada.

As well as being apart of the Vancouver art gallery, the building will also be the first passive house art gallery in North America.

Passive house is an ultra-low energy performance standard within buildings and will further the gallery’s vision of creating safe and inclusive spaces, while meeting Canada’s efficiency standards in the goal of net-zero.

The building itself will showcase a variety of artists local to Canada and from around the world. It will also have a multi-purpose Indigenous community house, public art spaces, a theatre, and initiatives for marginalized groups.

For Fry, this new building will play an important role in supporting the groups that need it most.

“Cultural spaces and institutions like the Vancouver Art Gallery play an important role in supporting vibrant and inclusive communities. They connect the past with the present through exhibits that inform and inspire, they safeguard priceless artefacts and works of art, and they promote the talent of our Canadian artists and creators.”

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Restitution: Africa’s Stolen Art – Plunder – Al Jazeera English

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Video Duration 24 minutes 50 seconds

From: Featured Documentaries

The story of the large-scale plunder of African art and artefacts under European colonialism.

In the 19th and 20th centuries, European powers colonised the African continent and plundered its cultural artefacts on a massive scale.

Pieces of great local significance were pillaged by invading soldiers, seized by the colonial authorities, or taken by Christian missionaries.

The Europeans then put these works on display in their museums, in ethnographic exhibitions labelled “Negro Art”.

The works inspired artists like Pablo Picasso to produce some of the most innovative art of the 20th century.

This is episode 1 of a 3-part series.

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Sustainability, green energy, and world class visual art all meet in new art gallery building – Nelson Star

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A new building that will connect sustainable energy and world class visual art has just been announced and is set to open in 2027.

Made public by minister of Canadian heritage Pablo Rodriguez and long-standing MP Hedy Fry, the centre will receive $29 million in funding through the federal government and Infrastructure Canada.

As well as being apart of the Vancouver art gallery, the building will also be the first passive house art gallery in North America.

Passive house is an ultra-low energy performance standard within buildings and will further the gallery’s vision of creating safe and inclusive spaces, while meeting Canada’s efficiency standards in the goal of net-zero.

The building itself will showcase a variety of artists local to Canada and from around the world. It will also have a multi-purpose Indigenous community house, public art spaces, a theatre, and initiatives for marginalized groups.

For Fry, this new building will play an important role in supporting the groups that need it most.

“Cultural spaces and institutions like the Vancouver Art Gallery play an important role in supporting vibrant and inclusive communities. They connect the past with the present through exhibits that inform and inspire, they safeguard priceless artefacts and works of art, and they promote the talent of our Canadian artists and creators.”

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