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Pewdiepie Returns To YouTube With A Face Reveal | TheGamer – TheGamer

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YouTube’s biggest single content creator Felix Kjellberg, better known as Pewdiepie, has returned from a brief three-week break that he took during the first of the year. During his return episode, we learned that Pewdiepie—after a decade of being on YouTube—was finally going to give us a face reveal…in reverse.

Over the last ten years, we’ve become very familiar with what Pewdiepie looks like. The YouTuber has never been shy about showing his face and sharing stories of his life, no matter how embarrassing they may have been. However, given the popularity of YouTubers like Corpse Husband and Dream—who have never shown their faces—Pewdiepie felt that it was time to finally do a reverse face reveal.

Related: Developer Teases Terrifying New Sounds For Minecraft 1.17

In his first video in three-weeks, Pewdiepie returned to his usual comedic review of his community’s subreddit, r/pewdiepiesubmissions. Before jumping into the memes, though, the YouTuber used his intro to do what he called a “reverse face reveal.” All this entailed was turning off his camera and having his editor put an avatar in place of his face.

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As usual, Pewdiepie asked his audience to help him out by creating their own avatars and promised that the highest voted one would be his new avatar. Outside of YouTube, Pewdiepie has recently penned a deal with the video distribution company Jellysmack to bring video content to his Facebook page.

This deal prompted a strangely titled article in the New York Post that claimed that the YouTuber was “making a comeback.” The article contained a caption that said Pewdiepie had been absent for the last five years. Of course, this was all in reference to his absence from, and return to, Facebook—not YouTube. Not one to waste an opportunity, though, Pewdiepie was quick to point out that Felix Kjellberg had been making videos in his absence—in reference to a long-running joke that Pewdiepie and Felix Kjellberg are actually two different people.

Pewdiepie has proven time and again that he can not only keep his audience engaged but that he is still capable of growing his community. In 2020 alone, the YouTuber gained six million followers, through a combination of let’s play and reaction videos. At the end of the day, he has a total of 108 million followers on YouTube. With his reach extending to Facebook in the near future as well, it would be safe to say that Pewdiepie is going to be more prevalent than ever.

Next: CultureFly’s My Hero Academia “Quirks” Box Leaves Something To Be Desired

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Huawei's ecosystem marks formidable growth as app distributions on AppGallery nearly double in 12 months, including popular Canadian apps – Canada NewsWire

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The new figures come one year on from when Richard Yu, Executive Director and CEO of Huawei Consumer BG, unveiled Huawei’s vision to make AppGallery an open, innovative app distribution platform that is accessible to consumers around the world.

Commenting on Huawei’s ecosystem growth figures, Derek Yu, VP Huawei CEE & Nordic at Huawei Consumer BG, said: “Our AppGallery strategy has been to expand our user base to lay a solid foundation for the development of our ecosystem, and the growth figures indicate that the approach is working. Not only are we delivering new, locally relevant apps all the time, and providing our developer partners with exposure to an ever-growing audience, but we are also creating an unbeatable opportunity for success in the mobile apps market.”

The rapid growth of AppGallery has been boosted by the company’s investment as part of its efforts to grow Huawei Mobile Services (HMS) ecosystem. HMS now employs over 8000 R&D engineers and numbers more than 600 in its global technical support team. The result is that HMS Core integration apps have increased by 118% year on year to 120,000 and global quick app MAUs have grown a considerable 200% to 100 million.

“At the end of 2019, there were 25 countries around the world which had over a million AppGallery users. That number has now grown to 42 and we continue to see strong growth across markets in Europe, Latin America, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa. It’s not just about quantity, but the fact that the number of apps integrated with HMS Core has more than doubled in one year shows that more developers are looking to Huawei’s on-device capabilities to drive innovation and provide better and more unique user experiences,” said Zhang Zhe, Director of Global Partnerships & Eco-Development Business Development at Huawei Consumer BG.

AppGallery’s “Global + Local” Strategy – Helping Local Developers Tap into a Global Platform

AppGallery has concentrated its efforts on working with developers on both a local and global scale to bring the most relevant apps to users, helping boost the number of developers working with the platform and delivering more choices to consumers around the world.

Developers are increasingly looking to AppGallery to reach local audiences as well as tapping into AppGallery’s growing global audience. Throughout the year, AppGallery has seen global applications from the likes of Moovit and Bolt in the transportation industry, Viber in the communications sector and other popular apps such as Booking.com, and Tidal onboard to its growing platform.

As part of this strategy, Huawei is also leveraging its expertise in China to help overseas developers tap into the country’s lucrative app market. Considered a ‘mobile-first’ society, China is home to over 904 million mobile internet users with an estimated app download figure of over 100 billion, and AppGallery has helped over thousand overseas developers to enter China’s mobile economy in the last 12 months.

Apps such as PicsArt have been among the first to benefit now boasting over 300 million downloads in Mainland China. FaceTune 2 and Mondly have seen similar successes, receiving 2.2 million and 350 thousand downloads respectively.

AppGallery has also helped over 10,000 Chinese apps enter overseas markets and diversify global users’ app experience. Popular platforms such as Banggood were able to benefit from Huawei’s unique position. Other examples of Chinese apps reaching global audiences through AppGallery include Pascal’s Wager, Rise of Kingdoms: Lost Crusade and Night of Full Moon.

About AppGallery

AppGallery is a smart and innovative ecosystem that allows developers to create unique experiences for consumers.  Our unique HMS Core allows Apps to be integrated across different devices, delivering more convenience and a smoother experience – and this is part of our wider “1+8+N” strategy at Huawei.

With the AppGallery, our vision is to make it an open, innovative app distribution platform that is accessible to consumers, and at the same time, strictly protect users’ privacy and security while providing them with a unique and smart experience. Being one of the top three app marketplaces globally, AppGallery offers a wide variety of global and local Apps across 18 categories including navigation & transport, news, social media, and more. AppGallery is available in more than 170 countries and regions with over 530 million monthly active users globally. Huawei partnered with 2.3 million developers across the globe, and in 2020 the total downloads from AppGallery have reached 384.4 billion times.

For regular updates on AppGallery, follow us on:

URL: https://consumer.huawei.com/en/mobileservices/appgallery/ 
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AppGalleryOfficialPage/ 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AppGallery 
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_appgallery/ 
YouTube: https:// youtube.com/AppGallery  
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/huawei-app-gallery/ 

About HUAWEI Consumer BG

HUAWEI’s products and services are available in more than 170 countries and are used by a third of the world’s population. Fourteen R&D centres have been set up in Germany, Sweden, Russia, India and China. HUAWEI Consumer BG is one of HUAWEI’s three business units and covers smartphones, PC and tablets, wearables and cloud services, etc. HUAWEI’s global network is built on almost 30 years of expertise in the telecom industry and is dedicated to delivering the latest technological advances to consumers around the world.

For more information, please visit https://www.huawei.com/en 

SOURCE Huawei Consumer Business Group

For further information: Lauren Khalil, Public Relations Manager, [email protected], 519-999-4693

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Canada's C-Suite flocks to emerging audio app Clubhouse, but long-term appeal unclear – Thompson Citizen

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TORONTO — When earnings season rolls around, Duncan Fulton spends days preparing for calls with media, analysts and investors, but hardly ever gets a chance to deliver his messages directly to the people who frequent his Tim Hortons coffee shops or Popeyes drive-thrus.

That changed in February when the chief corporate officer of Restaurant Brands International joined chief executive Jose Cil on Clubhouse — an emerging audio platform that gives anyone with an iPhone and an app the ability to host and access discussions on every topic imaginable.

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“It’s like reimagined talk radio with calls, but we are the producer,” said Fulton, who hosted an “open kitchen” talk the day after RBI released its latest quarterly earnings.

“Our guests don’t care about our adjusted EBITDA. They care about real stuff, about our food, our brands, and so we said, ‘Why don’t we use Clubhouse?'”

Fulton and Cil are the latest Canadian executives to turn to the app started by San Francisco serial entrepreneurs Paul Davidson and Rohan Seth last spring as a new way to host public conversations.

As COVID-19 spread throughout the globe and lockdowns kept millions of people at home, executives from top venture capital and tech firms began to jockey for access to the invite-only audio platform.

By the start of 2021, hundreds of business leaders and other Canadians had joined Clubhouse, which has offered increasing numbers of invites since late last year.

Members have been able to hear SpaceX CEO Elon Musk discuss whether he believes in aliens, Shopify executives Tobi Lutke and Harley Finkelstein wax poetic about entrepreneurship and Wattpad founder Allen Lau talk about his recent decision to sell the company.

“It’s really democratizing corporate Canada and corporate America in a way,” says Fulton, “because normally consumers wouldn’t get this access to senior business leaders.”

He pitched a Clubhouse talk to Cil after being introduced to the platform by Ottawa restaurateur Stephen Beckta, who got his invite from Finkelstein.

After dipping into music conversations, Fulton found he liked the exploratory nature of the platform and that moderators have control over who can speak and when.

“If you’re a business leader that wants the safety of not taking questions, you can still go on there, share your views, and there’s lots of people that are happy to not participate, not ask questions and just listen,” he said.

Richard Lachman, a digital media professor at Ryerson University, agreed the platform can be helpful for executives wanting to manage their image, but said users will quickly drop out of conversations if a speaker is boring them or recognize when someone is too scripted.

Though executives go through media training, he said a few “embarrassments” will likely arise on the app if people don’t know how to respond to “aggressive” questions or can’t kick someone out of a discussion fast enough.

While the app doesn’t overtly market itself as private, its invite-only nature has built a casual atmosphere, even as its userbase grows.

Clubhouse did not respond to a request for comment, but has a “rule” banning transcribing, recording or sharing personal information heard on the app. The company recently removed a bot it found sneaking into discussions to restream them to people without the app.

Still, a quick search on social media reveals dozens of recordings and quotes from the app available online.

Prominent venture capitalists faced criticism last year when audio leaked of them ridiculing New York Times journalist Taylor Lorenz and complaining that so-called cancel culture — sometimes described as withdrawing support for someone caught misbehaving or using outmoded language and expressions — had gone too far.

There have also been privacy complaints from users who opted not to give the app access to their contact lists, but say it is detecting their sign-ups and alerting friends whose numbers they have stored.

Once on the app, some users reported they stumbled upon misogyny and racism in discussions, despite rules against abuse and bullying and a feature to report problematic users.

“Some of the challenges (Clubhouse) is facing is that this content is very unmoderated and we are not in 2003 in (Facebook founder) Mark Zuckerberg’s dorm room, pretending that anything we make we know where it’ll go and we’ll just let the market figure it out,” said Lachman.

“We know what might happen. Online spaces can be incredibly toxic, they can be harsh and we know that things can be taken out context very quickly and easily duplicated on other platforms.”

Despite the issues, Deepak Anand, chief executive of medical cannabis company Materia Ventures, joined the app. He hosts several pot discussions on it every week, but is careful in his approach.

He doesn’t share anything on Clubhouse he wouldn’t be comfortable with if it were leaked, but has seen several instances of people not realizing how public the app is.

“People generally like to share more than they normally would on the platform because it’s easy to get carried away and it almost seems like you’re having a conversation with friends,” he said.

Among the positives, Anand saysClubhouse has helped him discover new ways to network while stuck at home during the pandemic and increased his social media followers.

He’s unsure the app will continue to be his go-to because a competitor, Twitter Spaces, has caught his eye.

Tech Crunch reported that users who mined Twitter’s coding have found Spaces, which is still in pilot mode, experimenting with ways to embed tweets into discussions, offer transcription for users with disabilities and enhance blocking capabilities.

Facebook is said to be developing a similar platform, but hasn’t formally released any details.

The number of emerging audio apps and the flood of new Clubhouse users will make it even tougher for executives to stand out, Lachman predicted.

“This might have value right now, but in a year or two from now, that might get lost.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 1, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:QSR, TSX:SHOP)

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version included an incorrect title for Duncan Fulton.

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Canada's C-Suite flocks to emerging audio app Clubhouse, but long-term appeal unclear – Surrey Now-Leader – Surrey Now-Leader

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When earnings season rolls around, Duncan Fulton spends days preparing for calls with media, analysts and investors, but hardly ever gets a chance to deliver his messages directly to the people who frequent his Tim Hortons coffee shops or Popeyes drive-thrus.

That changed in February when the chief corporate officer of Restaurant Brands International joined chief executive Jose Cil on Clubhouse — an emerging audio platform that gives anyone with an iPhone and an app the ability to host and access discussions on every topic imaginable.

“It’s like reimagined talk radio with calls, but we are the producer,” said Fulton, who hosted an “open kitchen” talk the day after RBI released its latest quarterly earnings.

“Our guests don’t care about our adjusted EBITDA. They care about real stuff, about our food, our brands, and so we said, ‘Why don’t we use Clubhouse?’”

Fulton and Cil are the latest Canadian executives to turn to the app started by San Francisco serial entrepreneurs Paul Davidson and Rohan Seth last spring as a new way to host public conversations.

As COVID-19 spread throughout the globe and lockdowns kept millions of people at home, executives from top venture capital and tech firms began to jockey for access to the invite-only audio platform.

By the start of 2021, hundreds of business leaders and other Canadians had joined Clubhouse, which has offered increasing numbers of invites since late last year.

Members have been able to hear SpaceX CEO Elon Musk discuss whether he believes in aliens, Shopify executives Tobi Lutke and Harley Finkelstein wax poetic about entrepreneurship and Wattpad founder Allen Lau talk about his recent decision to sell the company.

“It’s really democratizing corporate Canada and corporate America in a way,” says Fulton, “because normally consumers wouldn’t get this access to senior business leaders.”

He pitched a Clubhouse talk to Cil after being introduced to the platform by Ottawa restaurateur Stephen Beckta, who got his invite from Finkelstein.

After dipping into music conversations, Fulton found he liked the exploratory nature of the platform and that moderators have control over who can speak and when.

“If you’re a business leader that wants the safety of not taking questions, you can still go on there, share your views, and there’s lots of people that are happy to not participate, not ask questions and just listen,” he said.

Richard Lachman, a digital media professor at Ryerson University, agreed the platform can be helpful for executives wanting to manage their image, but said users will quickly drop out of conversations if a speaker is boring them or recognize when someone is too scripted.

Though executives go through media training, he said a few “embarrassments” will likely arise on the app if people don’t know how to respond to “aggressive” questions or can’t kick someone out of a discussion fast enough.

While the app doesn’t overtly market itself as private, its invite-only nature has built a casual atmosphere, even as its userbase grows.

Clubhouse did not respond to a request for comment, but has a “rule” banning transcribing, recording or sharing personal information heard on the app. The company recently removed a bot it found sneaking into discussions to restream them to people without the app.

Still, a quick search on social media reveals dozens of recordings and quotes from the app available online.

Prominent venture capitalists faced criticism last year when audio leaked of them ridiculing New York Times journalist Taylor Lorenz and complaining that so-called cancel culture — sometimes described as withdrawing support for someone caught misbehaving or using outmoded language and expressions — had gone too far.

There have also been privacy complaints from users who opted not to give the app access to their contact lists, but say it is detecting their sign-ups and alerting friends whose numbers they have stored.

Once on the app, some users reported they stumbled upon misogyny and racism in discussions, despite rules against abuse and bullying and a feature to report problematic users.

“Some of the challenges (Clubhouse) is facing is that this content is very unmoderated and we are not in 2003 in (Facebook founder) Mark Zuckerberg’s dorm room, pretending that anything we make we know where it’ll go and we’ll just let the market figure it out,” said Lachman.

“We know what might happen. Online spaces can be incredibly toxic, they can be harsh and we know that things can be taken out context very quickly and easily duplicated on other platforms.”

Despite the issues, Deepak Anand, chief executive of medical cannabis company Materia Ventures, joined the app. He hosts several pot discussions on it every week, but is careful in his approach.

He doesn’t share anything on Clubhouse he wouldn’t be comfortable with if it were leaked, but has seen several instances of people not realizing how public the app is.

“People generally like to share more than they normally would on the platform because it’s easy to get carried away and it almost seems like you’re having a conversation with friends,” he said.

Among the positives, Anand saysClubhouse has helped him discover new ways to network while stuck at home during the pandemic and increased his social media followers.

He’s unsure the app will continue to be his go-to because a competitor, Twitter Spaces, has caught his eye.

Tech Crunch reported that users who mined Twitter’s coding have found Spaces, which is still in pilot mode, experimenting with ways to embed tweets into discussions, offer transcription for users with disabilities and enhance blocking capabilities.

Facebook is said to be developing a similar platform, but hasn’t formally released any details.

The number of emerging audio apps and the flood of new Clubhouse users will make it even tougher for executives to stand out, Lachman predicted.

“This might have value right now, but in a year or two from now, that might get lost.”

Tara Deschamps, The Canadian Press


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