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PM announces $240-million investment ‘to bring healthcare online’ – CityNews Calgary

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OTTAWA (NEWS 1130) — On Sunday, the Prime Minister announced the federal government will be investing over $240-million to provide health care services virtually. 

Justin Trudeau says since the outbreak it’s understandable if Canadians are feeling overwhelmed. 

“Canada has faced challenge and heartbreak, on a scale, we could never have expected,” he says. “If you need support, that’s okay.”

During his daily briefing, he added, to continue supporting Canadians, the federal government will be expanding existing online tools by creating new virtual platforms for mental health and primary care. 

This investment is an extension to the Wellness Together Canada website, which was launched in April. On this site, Canadians can find people to talk to during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“Whether you’re looking for strategies to manage stress or support from a professional, this will be a resource for you,” he says. 

Specialized tools made to specifically help marginalized communities will also be available. 

“If we can provide mental health support online, there’s no reason we can’t leverage technology in other areas of healthcare,” he adds. 

Through this investment, virtual care will be provided for the “times when you don’t need to see a doctor in person.”

“Take video conferencing — by helping doctors run appointments online. You can stay safe at home, while getting care, and our hospitals can stay focused on those who need it most,” he tells reporters. 

Additionally, on Sunday Procurement Minister Anita Anand will announce details on a new COVID-19 Supply Council.

“This council will be passed with finding innovative solutions to ensure our country continues to have the vital supplies necessary to keep Canadians safe,” Trudeau says. 

The Prime Minister also addresses parents and says they will be receiving additional help through the Canada Child Benefit. 

Parents can expect an extra $300 per child for families with kids. 

“That means an extra $600 for three kids, an extra $900, and so on,” he explains. 

“This is money for whatever you need, whether it’s online tutoring or groceries.”

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More cash, less buzz for 2020 investment bank interns – The Journal Pioneer

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By Elizabeth Howcroft

LONDON (Reuters) – Buzzing trading floors, classrooms and networking drinks have been replaced by online projects, ‘hackathons’ and fitness sessions for the class of 2020 investment banking interns.

Goldman Sachs , Morgan Stanley , Barclays , JP Morgan , UBS , RBC and Citi have all held internships virtually this year as they adapt to the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Schmoozing with executives and fellow interns has been via virtual coffees and quizzes, while Goldman Sachs laid on Zoom networking lunches, hackathons and fitness and cooking classes.

“We couldn’t have big parties or anything like that but we did work with a music start-up – there was a battle of the bands competition where the interns could vote,” Helena Sharpe, JP Morgan’s head of campus recruiting for EMEA, said.

Although many of the highly sought after schemes were cut to 5 weeks from the usual 8 or 10, most interns lucky enough to secure a place still received full pay while working from home.

Investment bank interns in London are usually paid around 10,000 pounds ($13,034) for a 10-week programme, financial careers website efinancialcareers.co.uk estimates.

Such internships offer the potential to kick start lucrative banking careers, but have come under scrutiny in the past for the long hours some students work in their effort to impress.

“Some of them probably still work relatively long days because they want to make a good impression and do the best they can on their projects,” Sharpe said.

How well virtual internships work-out is being closely watched by banks assessing the long-term future of remote working, particularly for new joiners, with Barclays and RBC considering keeping some elements for future programmes.

Banks have supplied the necessary kit for working from home. Goldman Sachs, which had around 380 interns in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), even sent electricity generators to those who needed them. “It’s one big experiment, but it feels great and the feedback’s been very positive,” Rob Ager, head of programmatic talent acquisition at Barclays, adding that although “authenticity” could get lost in the virtual world, working from home had created a more collaborative culture.

‘BUZZ AND VIBE’

There are limitations to the work banks can offer this year, with interns at JP Morgan working on case studies and projects rather than on placements within teams, while Morgan Stanley offered business simulations and work-related projects.

At Barclays, there were two weeks of classroom learning, and while some parts involved a real-life teacher others required watching videos on an online portal.

“You can’t really get the full buzz and vibe of the trading floor in a virtual setting, which is a bit disappointing,” an intern at one firm who asked not to be named said.

“I don’t think you get the true feel of work when you’re working from home and for me personally it would be easier to network in person and get to know people more genuinely.”

But working virtually has made interns less competitive with each other and more willing to help, the intern said, adding they were able to call each other to ask questions.

Citi has guaranteed all of its around 200 London interns a graduate job offer for 2021 so long as they meet the minimum requirements, easing the competitive dynamic.

For staff supervising the programmes, the virtual internship is not without challenges.

“I have to describe things over email and stuff or get on Zoom calls and all of these things that are just easier if it’s done live,” an associate at a U.S. investment bank said.

And while it is harder to monitor interns remotely, banks say they do their best to ensure hours are kept in check.

“We do encourage them to have a good work life balance and take regular breaks,” JP Morgan’s Sharpe said.

($1 = 0.7672 pounds)

(Reporting by Elizabeth Howcroft; Additional reporting by Imani Moise in New York; Editing by Rachel Armstrong and Alexander Smith)

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You can invest in this local property for as little as $1 | Urbanized – Daily Hive

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It’s no secret — real estate is not nearly as accessible as it was for our parents and even our grandparents. Especially in Vancouver, the price of ownership is high, and for many millennials, owning property or a piece of real estate is unattainable. 

According to a study done by Generation Squeeze, young Canadians in Vancouver need to save for 27 years in order to have enough money for a proper down payment — that’s more than five times as long as our parents.

The study also noted that even though COVID-19 has tempered the housing market, the housing affordability crisis will still be in full swing when the pandemic is over. Pre-COVID, more than half of the people under 30 living in Canada’s major cities spent 30% to 50% of their monthly paycheques on rent. Not only does this leave very little room to save for things, such as a down payment, but now that the pandemic has hit, this percentage has increased for many. 

This is why addy, a real estate crowdfunding platform, is making investing in real estate more accessible by reducing barriers to entry. And all it takes is $1.

45604 Airport Rd, Chilliwack/addy

So how does addy do it? 

It’s impossible to cut the high costs of the market. Instead, the company’s mission is to redefine what it means to be a homeowner, while providing younger investment seekers with a new avenue into the game. 

First, addy does their due diligence by scoping out the properties with the most potential to provide the highest return on investment (ROI). Once these properties have been identified and approved by the executive team, investment committee, and Board of Directors, they’re broken down into investment units starting at $1. 

On launch day, addy releases the property on their platform, and qualified members have the opportunity to purchase as many shares in the property as they desire. Investors who have bought in on a specific property can make money from rental income in the form of distributions or as a lump sum when the property is finally sold.

45604 Airport Rd, Chilliwack/addy

The first property launched by addy is located in Vancouver’s charming Trout Lake neighbourhood; it was sold out to 305 investors, the lowest investment being $1 and the largest being $95,000. 

This crowdfunding investment model reduces (but doesn’t eliminate) the overall risk, while giving millennials and Gen Zs an opportunity to get some skin in the game at a price point they’re able to afford. It also means investors aren’t responsible for managing tenants and other logistics associated with the property.

If you’re already getting out your pocketbook, addy is launching its next investment opportunity (only available to BC residents over 19 years of age) on August 11, 2020, with a minimum investment of $1 and a maximum investment of $1,500. 

This commercial property is a free-standing building with more than 2,100 sq ft of retail space located in the heart of Chilliwack, BC, on the southwest corner of Airport Road and Yale Road. Currently, the space is occupied by Starbucks and features a drive-thru plus 12 owned parking stalls. 

According to addy, the estimated timeline for return on your investment of this property is approximately five years. Any appreciation will be paid out at the end of the term, and investors can expect annual distributions from any excess cash flow.

If you’re interested in investing in this Chilliwack property or staying up-to-date on addy’s next property announcements, sign up for a free addy account wallet so you’re ready to invest when the right property comes along.

This content was created by Hive Labs in partnership with a sponsor

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More cash, less buzz for 2020 investment bank interns – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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By Elizabeth Howcroft

LONDON (Reuters) – Buzzing trading floors, classrooms and networking drinks have been replaced by online projects, ‘hackathons’ and fitness sessions for the class of 2020 investment banking interns.

Goldman Sachs , Morgan Stanley , Barclays , JP Morgan , UBS , RBC and Citi have all held internships virtually this year as they adapt to the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Schmoozing with executives and fellow interns has been via virtual coffees and quizzes, while Goldman Sachs laid on Zoom networking lunches, hackathons and fitness and cooking classes.

“We couldn’t have big parties or anything like that but we did work with a music start-up – there was a battle of the bands competition where the interns could vote,” Helena Sharpe, JP Morgan’s head of campus recruiting for EMEA, said.

Although many of the highly sought after schemes were cut to 5 weeks from the usual 8 or 10, most interns lucky enough to secure a place still received full pay while working from home.

Investment bank interns in London are usually paid around 10,000 pounds ($13,034) for a 10-week programme, financial careers website efinancialcareers.co.uk estimates.

Such internships offer the potential to kick start lucrative banking careers, but have come under scrutiny in the past for the long hours some students work in their effort to impress.

“Some of them probably still work relatively long days because they want to make a good impression and do the best they can on their projects,” Sharpe said.

How well virtual internships work-out is being closely watched by banks assessing the long-term future of remote working, particularly for new joiners, with Barclays and RBC considering keeping some elements for future programmes.

Banks have supplied the necessary kit for working from home. Goldman Sachs, which had around 380 interns in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), even sent electricity generators to those who needed them. “It’s one big experiment, but it feels great and the feedback’s been very positive,” Rob Ager, head of programmatic talent acquisition at Barclays, adding that although “authenticity” could get lost in the virtual world, working from home had created a more collaborative culture.

‘BUZZ AND VIBE’

There are limitations to the work banks can offer this year, with interns at JP Morgan working on case studies and projects rather than on placements within teams, while Morgan Stanley offered business simulations and work-related projects.

At Barclays, there were two weeks of classroom learning, and while some parts involved a real-life teacher others required watching videos on an online portal.

“You can’t really get the full buzz and vibe of the trading floor in a virtual setting, which is a bit disappointing,” an intern at one firm who asked not to be named said.

“I don’t think you get the true feel of work when you’re working from home and for me personally it would be easier to network in person and get to know people more genuinely.”

But working virtually has made interns less competitive with each other and more willing to help, the intern said, adding they were able to call each other to ask questions.

Citi has guaranteed all of its around 200 London interns a graduate job offer for 2021 so long as they meet the minimum requirements, easing the competitive dynamic.

For staff supervising the programmes, the virtual internship is not without challenges.

“I have to describe things over email and stuff or get on Zoom calls and all of these things that are just easier if it’s done live,” an associate at a U.S. investment bank said.

And while it is harder to monitor interns remotely, banks say they do their best to ensure hours are kept in check.

“We do encourage them to have a good work life balance and take regular breaks,” JP Morgan’s Sharpe said.

($1 = 0.7672 pounds)

(Reporting by Elizabeth Howcroft; Additional reporting by Imani Moise in New York; Editing by Rachel Armstrong and Alexander Smith)

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