Connect with us

Business

Porter Airlines, other companies to require COVID-19 vaccine or negative test for all staff – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Porter Airlines will require all of its staff to either get vaccinated against COVID-19 or test negative for the coronavirus before the start of every shift.

The Toronto-based airline, which is resuming flights next month after being grounded to passenger flights for almost a year and a half, said in a release on Wednesday that “team members must be fully vaccinated or present a negative COVID-19 test administered within 72 hours of the start of their shift.”

The airline says it is “the first Canadian airline committed to introducing these important safety measures.”

“Now every team member passengers come in contact with will either be fully vaccinated or recently tested. Working and flying with Porter will be a safer experience for everyone,” Porter’s CEO Michael Deluce said.

Employment lawyer Adam Savaglio, a partner with Scarfone Hawkins LLP in Hamilton, says there are a lot of misconceptions and incorrect assumptions about the law when it comes to vaccination mandates.

“They can’t necessarily compel, but they can certainly ask for evidence of vaccination because they have an underlying obligation to that worker and others in the workplace to provide a healthy and safe workplace,” he said in an interview.

More mandatory vaccination policies

The federal government recently said it plans to mandate vaccination for federally regulated employers and workers, along with all passengers travelling by plane, boat or train. 

Numerous large companies including Amazon, Facebook, Twitter and Google, have said they will require staff who choose to come into the office to be vaccinated before doing so.

On Wednesday, Australian airline Qantas announced a similar policy that will require all staff to be vaccinated or show proof of a negative test before coming to work as of November.

Unlike Canada, where more than 80 per cent of the eligible population has received at least one dose, the vast majority of Australians have yet to be vaccinated, so the airline’s push is an ambitious one.

Live event giant Live Nation also announced on Wednesday it will require concert attendees at any of its events this fall to be vaccinated.

And as first reported by the Globe and Mail on Wednesday, financial services giant Sun Life will also require proof of vaccination for any of its 12,000 staff choosing to return to its offices in Toronto, Montreal and Waterloo.

Questions about enforcement

Employment lawyer Lindsay Scott says she expects more and more companies will make similar moves in the coming days and weeks.

“With the federal government’s move on this point this week as well, I’m not surprised that more and more companies feel comfortable making this kind of policy,” the partner at Paliare Roland LLP in Toronto said in an interview with CBC News.

For Scott, the question is not whether such a vaccine mandate is legal — “It is,” she said — but how it will be enforced

“The question is really what is going to be the outcome if somebody doesn’t comply? Most companies at the moment are saying that if somebody doesn’t comply, then there may have to be some sort of education session or perhaps they will be reassigned to duties that aren’t client or customer facing.”

But she said most companies she’s heard of with this policy are not saying that non-compliance would be grounds for termination.

Savaglio is more blunt, saying the consequences will be dire for companies that don’t consider mandated vaccinations for their employees.

“It’s proven that those who are unvaccinated are more likely to suffer harmful consequences,” he said, so beyond being liable for their employees, airlines like Porter could also be potentially liable for their passengers as well.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Citi hires Milovanovic from Goldman to head Americas financials M&A group

Published

 on

Citigroup Inc is hiring Steve Milovanovic to head its investment banking unit which focuses on mergers and acquisitions by financial institutions in the Americas, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters on Thursday.

Milovanovic will join from Goldman Sachs Group, where he was co-head of M&A for the financial institution’s group (FIG) in the Americas, said the memo, the contents of which were confirmed by a Citigroup spokesperson.

“Steve’s experience, judgment and client relationships will further strengthen Citi’s strategic advisory capabilities,” the memo said, noting that Milovanovic will be based in New York.

Milovanovic, who has also worked at Credit Suisse Group in his banking career, has more than 20 years of dealmaking experience, with a focus on financial services.

 

(Reporting by Chibuike Oguh in New York; Writing by David French; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall)

Continue Reading

Business

GM extends EV Bolt production halt to mid-October

Published

 on

WASHINGTON (Reuters) –General Motors Co said on Thursday it will extend a shutdown of a Michigan assembly plant to mid-October following a new recall of its Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicles over battery issues after 12 reported fires.

The largest U.S. automaker said the extension of the production halt at its Orion Assembly plant will go through at least Oct. 15. GM also said it was cutting production at six other North American assembly plants because of the ongoing semiconductor chips shortage.

GM said it will not resume Bolt production or sales until it is satisfied that the recall remedy will address the fire risk issue. It said Thursday it had reports of 12 fires and three injuries.

GM shares were largely unchanged in late trading.

GM in August widened its recall of the Bolt to more than 140,000 vehicles to replace battery modules, at a cost now estimated at $1.8 billion. The automaker said it would seek reimbursement from battery supplier LG.

It is not clear how long it will take GM to obtain replacement battery modules for recalled vehicles and whether it will have diagnostic software that will allow it to certify some modules do not need replacing.

GM said the additional three-week production halt at its Bolt plant comes as it continues “to work with our supplier to update manufacturing processes.”

Earlier this month GM was forced to halt production at most North American assembly plants temporarily because of the chips shortage.

The new production cuts include a Lansing, Michigan, plant that builds the Chevrolet Traverse and the Buick Enclave.

GM is also cutting production of SUVs like the Chevrolet Equinox, Blazer and GMC Terrain at plants in Mexico and Canada. It will also make further production cuts at Michigan and Kansas plants that make Chevrolet Camaro and Malibu cars.

The Commerce Department said on Wednesday it plans a Sept. 23 White House meeting with automakers and others “to discuss the ongoing global chip shortage, the impact the Delta variant has had on global semiconductor supply chains and the industry’s progress toward improving transparency.”

(Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Dan Grebler)

Continue Reading

Business

Present Yourself as a ‘No Brainer’ to Hire

Published

 on

A few jobs back, HR had scheduled four interviews, throughout my day, for a position I had open. The first interview went “okay.” The second candidate, however, impressed me so much I hired him on the spot. I instructed HR to cancel the remaining two interviews.

 

The second candidate did something I rarely see—they presented themselves as a ‘no brainer’ to hire.

 

How?

 

  • Their resume was result-oriented (Not a list of opinions — “I’m a team player,” “detail-oriented,” “hard-working,” etc.).
  • They dressed as if they were already employed with my company. (In this case, a global multi-brand tour operator.)
  • They clearly articulated their value.
  • They told me several STAR (Situation. Task. Action. Results.) stories I could envision and relate to.

 

If your resume (skills and experience) impressed the employer, and after reading your LinkedIn profile to determine if you’re interview-worthy, you’ll be invited to an interview—the first most likely being via Zoom or Skype.

 

Impressing someone on paper and via your LinkedIn profile has its challenges, especially since you’re competing against many other candidates just as qualified as you. However, where the rubber meets the road is when you’re sitting face-to-face with the hiring manager.

 

Presenting yourself in a way your interviewer can envision you fitting with the company’s culture and the current team, as well as gives them confidence you’ll hit the ground running, will substantially increase your odds of receiving a nod of approval.

 

Regardless of whether you’re interviewing via video, sitting in a boardroom, a coffee shop or the interviewer’s office, focus on the following:

 

  1. Your attire
  2. Your body language
  3. Articulating how you meet the employer’s needs and will solve the problems the position exists to solve
  4. Being mindful of your interviewer’s time.

 

 

As I’ve mentioned in a previous column, being deemed “a fit” supersedes your experience and qualifications. Your image is paramount in giving the impression you’re “one of them.”

 

Make sure your attire is in line with the company culture. Obviously, this will differ from company to company, as well as between industries. If you’re interviewing for a position in a bank or insurance company, formal attire, even in 2021, is appropriate, such as a business suit, shirt, and tie. On the opposite end of the spectrum, casual clothing, even jeans and sneakers, can be acceptable if you’re interviewing with a design studio or tech start-up. The key is to dress as if you already work for the employer.

 

  1. Body language.

 

Your body language, along with your words, greatly influences the first impressions someone has about you.

 

If you’re seated, say in the reception area, stand to greet your interviewer. Firmly shake your interviewer’s hand, or each member of your interview panel, while maintaining a broad smile and steady eye contact. Say something along the lines of, “Nice to meet you, Alice.” Remember your interviewer’s name and use it naturally throughout your interview. Maintain eye contact during the interview. This shows your interviewer(s) you’re engaged in the conversation. Speak in a clear and audible voice. Your posture can portray you as arrogant, so be conscious of the way you sit or stand. During the interview, display a natural body language with relaxed shoulders and open arms by your side.

 

  1. Articulate how you meet the employer’s needs. 

 

This is where you solidify, you’re a ‘no brainer’ to hire. 

 

If you’re interviewing with the person you’d be reporting to, keep this piece of human psychology in mind: A person is more likely to want to build a relationship with you if you understand their situation, problems, and goals.

 

Start with the job description. Now that you’ve landed an interview, refer to the job description, paying close attention to job qualifications and duties.

 

Have STAR stories ready regarding specific situations in which you used each of these skills. Try to keep your STARs short and vivid. The best STAR ever said to me: “I sold Corvettes in Las Vegas.” (Yes, I hired the person.)

 

  1. Be mindful of the time.

 

Always be punctual for your scheduled interview time! Being punctual is a sign of being a professional, as well as respect for the other person. Stick within the time frame your interview was scheduled for. (usually 45 minutes to 1 hour)

 

In 2021 employers are looking for candidates who’ll mesh with their workplace culture. Showing you belong will go a long way in making yourself a ‘no brainer’ to hire.

______________________________________________________________

 

Nick Kossovan, a well-seasoned veteran of the corporate landscape, offers advice on searching for a job. You can send him your questions at artoffindingwork@gmail.com.

 

 

Continue Reading

Trending