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Real Estate Investments in Greater Vancouver Offer Most Attractive Investment Yield

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Is there an investment asset that can produce a 366 percent return in a three-decade span? Yes, it is the housing property in Canada. Is there an investment asset that can beat this performance? Yes, it is the property in Greater Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada. Indeed, Greater Vancouver has proven to be one of the real estate investment hotspots, given its appeal as an investment market that boasts natural beauty, strong economic and demographic fundamentals, and financial stability, which ensures optimal yield for a low level of investment risk.

Property prices in Greater Vancouver, BC, have risen by some 473.7 percent in the period between 1980 and 2009, yielding, on average, a spectacular 17 percent per annum over the noted period. In other words, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and RE/MAX Canada, the average price of residential property in Greater Vancouver in 1980 was slightly over $100,000. Today, that same property is worth, on average, somewhat more than $574,000.

The noted return on investment looks incredibly attractive, given the low risk associated with residential property investments. Investments in residential real estate in Greater Vancouver have been characterized by exceptional stability. The average price of a house in Greater Vancouver dipped seven times in the past 30 years. Most of the dips occurred in the late 1990s. However, all declines in average prices of homes in Greater Vancouver have been exceptionally mild, with the largest annual decreases not exceeding 3.5 percent.

This performance of real estate investments in Greater Vancouver looks remarkable compared to the implementation of property investments in the Canadian housing market as a whole or performance of investments in most other regional real estate markets in Canada. As noted earlier, the average price of a property in Canada has risen by 366 percent between 1980 and 2009. This translates into an average annual return of 13 percent in the same period. Only Victoria, Regina, Toronto, and Ottawa have recorded returns higher than this average for Canada as a whole. Victoria, located in British Columbia, has the second-highest return on residential real estate investments in the Canadian property market. An investment in Victoria’s housing property has returned 448.5 percent in total return, or 16 percent on average each year between 1980 and 2009. This makes British Columbia the best performing regional property market in Canada.

On the other hand, taking an international investment perspective, even less robust, would have been investment returns on U.S. real estate. Based on the average values of homes in the United States between 1980 and 2009 (using the Freddie Mac Conventional Home Price Index), an investment of $100,000 in residential properties in the United States in 1980 would be worth $382,576 today. This would represent a total return, measured by the increase in home prices, of 283 percent over the noted period. In other words, an investment in the real estate market in the United States would have produced an average nominal yield of 10 percent per annum, which is much lower than that earned on the property investment in Greater Vancouver.

Investments in residential real estate in the Greater Vancouver area look exceptionally appealing, given their outstanding performance relative to property investments in other regions of Canada and the U.S. real estate market. Therefore, investing in Greater Vancouver’s property market can represent an investment choice that promises high yield for a low level of investment risk.

 

 

 

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Canada real estate: TD Economics sees high home prices holding up in fourth quarter before dropping in 2021 – The Georgia Straight

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Home buyers looking for a bit of a discount may want to wait a little.

A housing report by TD Economics predicts that high home prices will persist for the rest of 2021.

“Regarding prices, we think they’ll hold up at these record levels in the fourth quarter…,” economist Rishi Sondhi wrote.

Then things will start to ease in 2021.

Sondhi explained that tight supply is driving high home prices.

According to the TD Bank economist, the real-estate market is currently in seller’s territory.

The economist noted that the national sales-to-new listings ratio in September “registered a drum-tight reading” of 77.2 percent.

He noted that “markets were the tightest they’ve been in nearly 20 years in September”.

Sales-to-new listings ratio is the number of sales divided by listings.

A seller’s market means that the sales-to-listing ratio is 60 percent or more, or six sales out of 10 listings.

A balanced market features a ratio between 40 percent and 60 percent.

A buyer’s market happens when the ratio is less than 40 percent, which means fewer than four sales for 10 listings.

In a report on October 15, the Canadian Real Estate Association noted that the national average price of a home set a new record in September.

The average price topped the $600,000 mark for the first time at more than $604,000.

In his report on October 15, Sondhi predicted “some easing is anticipated” for prices after the fourth quarter of 2020.

This is consistent with Sondhi’s previous report on October 8.

The bank economist noted in that earlier report that “unlike sales, an immediate fourth quarter pullback is unlikely” for prices.

 “In fact, another (modest) gain could be in the cards,” Sondhi wrote.

“After the fourth quarter,” Sondhi predicted on October 8, “Canadian prices will likely drop through the first half of 2021 by around 7%, before regaining some traction later next year.”

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Brookfield weighs US$3B life-sciences real estate portfolio sale – BNN

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Brookfield Asset Management Inc. is exploring a sale of its life-sciences real estate portfolio, and seeking about US$3 billion, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

The Toronto-based alternative asset manager is working with advisers to sell roughly 2.3 million square feet of life-sciences real estate it acquired as part of its 2018 purchase of Forest City Realty Trust Inc., said the people, who requested anonymity because the information isn’t public.

A Brookfield representative declined to comment.

Blackstone Group Inc. agreed last week to recapitalize a portfolio of BioMed Realty life-sciences buildings for US$14.6 billion, a deal that will generate US$6.5 billion of cumulative profits four years after investing in the properties.

Life sciences, which includes pharmaceutical, biotech and other medical research fields, is a sector where most staff can’t work remotely. That has stabilized the value of such properties.

Alexandria Real Estate Equities Inc., one of the largest real estate investment trusts that owns on life sciences properties, has fallen 2 per cent this year compared to a 14.6 per cent decline of the Bloomberg U.S. REITs Index.

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ULI & PwC to Release ‘Emerging Trends in Real Estate’ Report

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An upcoming report on Canada’s real estate market will highlight our nation’s resiliency through the COVID-19 pandemic. Nationwide impacts to retail, office spaces, and suburbanization have been felt hard in the development industry, as landowners, sellers, and buyers are all affected by the trials of 2020. Many in the industry are viewing this as a prime opportunity to reposition their portfolios, so this is among the topics to be covered in PwC and ULI’s new Emerging Trends in Real Estate report.

“The coming year will be all about embracing opportunities to be resilient in the face of uncertainty, while shifting strategies in anticipation of market headwinds,” reads a statement issued by Frank Magliocco, National Real Estate Leader, PwC Canada. “For the first time in a few years, we’re hearing divergent views from industry players about issues like the future of office spaces and the urbanization and suburbanization trends.”

Downtown Toronto, image by Forum contributor Michael62

Set to be released on October 30th, the report’s 2021 edition touches on trends and outlooks in the Canadian and US real estate markets. Among these are specific changes to the market, including breakdowns of specific submarkets. Within the commercial real estate submarket, this includes details on retail troubles, office space uncertainty, and warehousing gains. Within the residential real estate submarket, the report discusses the concept of “creating 18-hour cities across Canada,” environments that combine live, work and play elements, as more Canadians are drawn towards more spread out suburban communities.

“The tension between longer term trends and fundamentals and short-term realities manifests in this year’s must-read report,” reads a statement from Richard Joy, Executive Director of Urban Land Institute Toronto. Prudence, “in the face of uncertainty, while dampening some sectors and trends, is accelerating and expanding others.”

The report is to be launched at the end of the month with an online webinar event led with a keynote delivered by Andrew Warren, Director of Real Estate Research at PwC, which is set to be followed by a panel of local experts panel to be moderated by PwC. The program has been expanded, with this year’s event offering attendees the opportunity to participate in various sessions, including a closing Fireside Chat with Jon Love and Aliyah Mohamed to further explore the economic landscape of the real estate development sector.

Those wishing to attend the ULI/PwC Annual Trends in Real Estate webinar on Friday October 30th, from 8 AM to 12 PM, can register at this link.

 

Source: – Urban Toronto

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