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Regina's Nuit Blanche reinvents itself as a drive-thru art festival – CBC.ca

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For one night every year, the streets of Regina become an art gallery at the nighttime festival known as Nuit Blanche.

Usually, festival-goers explore the downtown streets after dark to get up close and personal with the lit-up artwork, as they would at any art gallery, simply in a less traditional location.

But COVID-19 measures meant Regina’s Nuit Blanche organizers had to rethink the festival.

“It’s been a bit challenging, we’ve had to adapt, but we’re really happy with what we’ve planned for this year,” artistic director Michelle Harazny told CBC’s The Morning Edition

Drive-thru with a DJ

Instead of walking downtown, attendees will drive through the Warehouse District. Installations will be projected on the wide, blank walls abundant in the neighbourhood, and cars will spend three minutes at each installation, with glow-stick-emblazoned cyclists from Bike Regina pacing the cars.

Harazny said it should take about 30 minutes to drive through the festival.

DJ Cakebaby’s live set from the Centennial Market parking lot will be broadcast on 87.9 fm, “like going to a drive-in movie or drive-in concert,” Harazny said.

The organizers had already been planning the 2020 festival for months when COVID-19 hit. Instead of cancelling or moving the event online, they reformulated their plans to work as a drive-thru. But in the early days of the pandemic, even that wasn’t a sure bet.

“We were always considering all the possibilities and being cautious, and we delayed our responses to the artist applicants this year because we were waiting to see how things go.”

Harazny is particularly excited to see some of the very large projections, like Liquid Light by Ian Campbell — an improvised piece using oil, water and colouring techniques — and the music video Isol8 by ygretz.

“It’s a night to go out and look at art and explore the city and look at artworks in spaces that you wouldn’t normally see them, like in an alley, in a park or the side of a building.”

The free, family-friendly event runs from 8:00-11:00 p.m. CST Saturday, starting at the corner of Dewdney Avenue and Cornwall Street.

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NYC Startup Maireann Makes Fine Art Collections More Accessible – The Ritz Herald

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Maireann is a New York-based Fine Art marketplace that sells top-quality signed and limited edition prints. They launched on August 15, 2020. The fine art prints they sell are targeted at consumers desiring to purchase high-value art but cannot afford outrageously-expensive collections. Maireann wants to ultimately make quality art that will appreciate in value more readily available.

Nebulous I – Photographed by Mario De La Isla. Yosemite National Park, California, 2015

“Maireann helps photographers survive and make a living, especially during these trying times,” exclaimed Creative Director Freddie Leiba who’s worked with some of the top names in art and fashion like Andy Warhol, Irving Penn, Annie Leibovitz, Albert Watson, Joseph Chen, Helmut Newton, Horst P. Horst, and Francesco Scavullo to name a few. “I’ve seen many Photographers struggle to find a good marketplace to sell to art collectors,” added Leiba, ” Maireann helps solve this problem.”

Says New York Fashion Photographer Joseph Chen, “The series Forme Féminine et Sensualité is an ongoing study I have been working on and off for the last 10 years, it revolves around the intricate relationship between sensuality and the female form. Maireann is a great platform to share my work to the world, it also gives me the opportunity to do what I feel, which is sometimes hard to do on commissioned advertising jobs.” Supermodel Megan Irminger, who worked with Chen over the years, adds, “I think it’s a beautiful piece illustrating the light that women bring to this world.” The series Forme Féminine et Sensualité by Chen is sold exclusively with Maireann.

Maireann accomplishes their mission by lowering the cost of the art to the consumer while offering a majority of the sales price to the artist. Maireann keeps a very low percentage of each print sold in comparison to other marketplaces. Maireann even offers free shipping on all orders $200 and above.

“It’s been a pleasure to work with Maireann to sell my photography,” added photographer Mario De La Isla. “Previously, I’ve struggled to find buyers who would appreciate my limited-edition prints. But with the help of Maireann, I’m able to focus more on creating art than worrying about selling my work.” De La Isla is a veteran photographer for National Geographic.

Lastly, Maireann is currently on the lookout for artists that they, themselves, bring a unique point of view, to help showcase fresh exceptional talent to the art world.

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New art piece in Lacombe acknowledges roots of the land and reconciliation – rdnewsnow.com

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“It is a metal sculpture of two rough grouse, with two logs; the female is sitting on one log and the male is landing at the end of the other,” explains Maureen MacKenzie, community services executive assistant with The City of Lacombe. “It was created to represent the affinity between rough grouse, but also that people have for one another. It also represents the two communities and local First Nations.”

According to a release, grouse was an imported food source for settlers and Indigenous peoples when bison populations dwindled across the prairies. The piece also pays homage to settler and Indigenous communities living and working together across Canada’s west.

MacKenzie adds The City had a robust anti-racism program planned earlier this year, but once again COVID-19 caused its postponement. The program was meant for large groups and would’ve included the blanket exercise, a 60s Scoop exhibition, and other workshops.

“The last census in 2016 indicated we have over 800 residents of Lacombe who are Indigenous, which is almost 10 per cent of our population, so it’s really important we show we’re willing to walk the walk,” MacKenzie says. “We as a city want to embrace all of our cultures, and in this instance, with truth and reconciliation in mind, our plan is to host those workshops eventually, and that’s our way of saying we’re taking action on inclusion and racism.”

‘Miweyihtowin’ was created at a cost of $18,000.

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North Dakota Museum of Art reopens Tuesday with launch of 'Art in Isolation' exhibition – Grand Forks Herald

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The exhibition consists of assemblages of images submitted by artists and others in 35 countries around the world, including Portugal and Russia, as well as area communities, said Matthew Anderson, the museum’s director of education.

Last spring, museum staff members issued an online invitation to people asking them to submit images of how they were expressing their creativity during quarantine.

“Thousands of images started arriving from around the world …. The images describe an outpouring of creative expression,” said Anderson, adding that the pandemic has caused unanticipated change. “Change also fuels creativity, and that is what the North Dakota Museum of Art brought to light.”

As part of the launch of the “Art in Isolation” exhibition, the museum is asking visitors to donate a nonperishable food item to give to those in need and place it in drop boxes in the entry. Anyone who is in need may pick up a food item after viewing the exhibition; all remaining items will be donated to local food banks.

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The exhibition runs through Oct. 7.

Other exhibitions include “Consequences,” with artwork by Lynne Allen, a descendant of the Hunkpapa band of the Lakota on Standing Rock. In the late 1990s, after reading the journals of her great-grandmother, Josephine Waggoner, Allen began making objects that reflect the culture in those writings. These objects were crafted from paper, cut and stitched to shape and lacquered with shellac or from recycled vellum printed with images copied from Waggoner’s journals.

The museum is presenting more than 20 major prints by Allen, an internationally known printmaker, Anderson said.

The “Celebration” exhibition features artwork from the museum’s permanent collection, including Julie Buffalohead’s “Stolen Sisters,” a 4-by-18-foot, mural-sized acquisition that anchors the show. It illustrates the use of acrylic paint, ink, graphite and collage, applied to Nepalese Lokta paper, which has been used in Nepal since the 12th century to write epic tales, print mantra for use in prayer wheels and religious texts chanted by Buddhist monks.

The museum, located on the UND campus, south of Twamley Hall, has been closed to the public since mid-March when the national public health emergency, due to the spread of COVID-19, was declared.

When the facility reopens, new hours will be from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays.

The museum will be following CDC guidelines and working with UND officials to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, Anderson said. Visitors will be required to wear face masks and encouraged to practice social distancing.

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