Connect with us

Science

Researchers Discover The Largest Microplastic Heap Ever Seen On The Seabed – Somag News

Published

on



According to a study published in Science Alert, researchers have discovered the largest microplastic stack ever seen. The researchers also responded to how plastic piles could spread so much.

We know that plastic waste harms the sea and marine life. But what if those big plastics we see in the water are just the tip of the iceberg, and those plastics make up only 1% of the plastics in the sea? What happens to the 99% portion that we didn’t see then?

Plastic wastes gradually turn into smaller particles in the ocean, which we call microplastics, and these particles can be smaller than 5 millimeters. According to a new study shared in Science Alert, researchers faced the largest microplastic stack ever seen.

The largest stack ever seen:
Along with the research, the amount covering the word ‘excessive’ was revealed. As a result of the research, 1.9 million pieces of microplastics were discovered on the sea floor, reaching a thickness of 5 centimeters in just one square meter. This level has gone down in history as the highest microplastic level ever detected in the ocean.

Although microplastics are found on sea floors worldwide, the researchers did not have a clear idea of ​​how these plastics got there. In the framework of the research, it was thought that the microplastics would break down according to their size and density. However, some of the plastics remained on the water while others were sinking.

The plastics that remained on the water surface descended to the bottom of the water as they moss. Recent research has revealed that rivers also carry microplastics to the oceans. In fact, as a result of laboratory experiments, it was observed that microplastics accumulating on the sea floor can go down to the canyons in the sea.

Researchers working on the Mediterranean shores of Italy said that the microplastics on the sea floor are part of fabric or textile products. These types of microplastics turn their health into a gambling game because they are consumed as food by living things. Because many studies have revealed that toxins accumulating in such plastics harm organisms. The discovery explained how microplastics reached the oceans and lifted the veil of secret.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

The Strawberry Moon Eclipse May Be Visible Over Metro Vancouver This Week – 604 Now

Published

on


Metro Vancouver is in for a treat this week, as we’ll be able to see the Strawberry Moon eclipse shine over the city this Friday.

Named after the red summer fruit, this phenomenon is June’s full moon – or otherwise called the Hot Moon or Rose moon.

RELATED: Vancouver Shoots Down Motion To Allow Drinking in Public Areas

This particular moon, however, kicks off 2020’s “eclipse season,” and will be visible during the moonrise and moonset. 

.bsaProContainer-5 .bsaProItem
clear: both;
width: 100% !important;
margin-left: 0 !important;
margin-right: 0 !important;

You’ll just have to be ready at either 5:30 am or 8 pm, Friday, to see the eclipse over Metro Vancouver. 

So, will you be checking it out this week? 

Friday, June 5th is also the day of the second George Floyd protest, happening downtown.

For more Vancouver stories, head to our News section.

.bsaProContainer-5 .bsaProItem
clear: both;
width: 100% !important;
margin-left: 0 !important;
margin-right: 0 !important;

Log in or create an account to save content

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

How To Watch The Mesmerising Penumbral Lunar Eclipse This Week – Tyla

Published

on


A penumbral lunar eclipse is taking place this Friday 5th June – and you may be able to catch a glimpse of the mesmerising spectacle if conditions are good.

A penumbral eclipse is more subtle than a total eclipse but just as fascinating, according to the Royal Observatory Greenwich, explaining that the phenomenon occurs “when the Moon travels only through the outer, fainter part of the Earth’s shadow, or ‘penumbra’.”

The penumbra causes only a slight darkening of the Moon’s surface, with the Moon still exposed to some direct sunlight (Credit: Unsplash)

They add: “This happens when the Earth moves between the Sun and Moon but the three do not form a perfectly straight line.

“The penumbra causes only a slight darkening of the Moon’s surface, with the Moon still exposed to some direct sunlight, so this type of eclipse is easy to miss.”

This process of passing through the Earth’s shadow not only means that the moon’s surface appears darker, but that it may appear to take on a reddish or tea-coloured tinge.

The Strawberry Moon is the nickname given to the full moon in June. It is said that Native Americans and European tribes would give names to the moon because they used it to map out their yearly calendar and times of harvest.

This Friday’s penumbral eclipse will be visible from most of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and the East coast of South America.

Friday's penumbral eclipse will be visible from most of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and the East coast of South America (Credit: Unsplash)
Friday’s penumbral eclipse will be visible from most of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and the East coast of South America (Credit: Unsplash)

It’s worth noting that a penumbral eclipse can be more difficult to see with the naked eye – this is because only a portion of the sun’s light is blocked from reaching the moon.

According to NASA, the eclipse starts at 18.46 BST and ends at 22.04 BST. If you want to try to catch from your window, it will be at its clearest at 20.25 BST.

The moon will be 230,000 miles from the Earth – quite a close point in its orbit – which means that it should appear quite big.

This year’s penumbral eclipse will pass close pass to the giant red star, Antares, which is around 12 times the size of our own sun.

The Strawberry Moon is the nickname given to the full moon in June (Credit: Unsplash)
The Strawberry Moon is the nickname given to the full moon in June (Credit: Unsplash)

Happy gazing, earthlings.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

The June 2020 Night Sky – Portugal Resident

Published

on


Welcome to the June night sky. This is the month of the summer Solstice in the northern hemisphere. It happens on the 20th this year and, after that date, the Sun will appear to move slightly lower each day in the mid-day sky. June 20 is, therefore, the longest day of the year and the first day of summer.

Although June also has the shortest nights of the year, it’s not short on meteor showers with more than a dozen of them visible during the month. This means that on any dark night in June, you will have a better-than-average chance of seeing a shooting star.

On the 21st, there is an annular eclipse of the Sun. These types of eclipses occur because, at that time, the Moon is slightly further away from the Earth than usual and, therefore, does not cover the solar disc fully and the ring of fire effect will be seen. Unfortunately, this event is not visible from Europe. The eclipse track is mainly over the Middle East and central China, with the famous city of Wuhan just missing out on the ring of fire but seeing an 86% eclipse at 4pm local time.

The gas giant planets Jupiter and Saturn are now rising just after midnight over in the south-eastern sky. They are both in the far southern constellation of Sagittarius.

Jupiter is the brightest of the pair, and this year Jupiter can be used to help find Pluto. This close encounter between the largest and the smallest planets in the solar system will happen three times this year and is called a triple conjunction. This is quite rare and the last time that it occurred was 65 years ago.

Pluto is seven times further away from the Sun than Jupiter and much smaller, so it is more than a million times fainter and can only be seen in a large telescope and a dark sky.

The ringed planet Saturn is always a fine sight through any small telescope with its rings and multiple faint Moons visible.

Jupiter has four major moons, and these are quite easy to see with any small telescope. Jupiter’s Moons were discovered by Galileo using a tiny homemade telescope magnifying about 20 times and this was more than 400 years ago.

The Moon is full on the 5th, last quarter on the 13th, new on the 21st and first quarter on June 28, 2020.

| features@algarveresident.com
Clive Jackson is the Director of the Camera Obscura (next to the Castle in Tavira), specialising in education and public outreach.
281 322 527 | info@torredetavira.com www.torredetavira.com

To see the June Sky Map click on the pdf link below

2020-06 June nightsky

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending