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Review: iPhone 12 Pro Max deserves a spot in your pocket — if you can get it to fit – CNET

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The iPhone 12 Pro Max has the largest screen ever on an iPhone.


Patrick Holland/CNET

The iPhone 12 Pro Max ($1,099 at Amazon) follows in the footsteps of the 7 Plus and gets camera upgrades that none of the other iPhone 12 models have. At its core the iPhone 12 Pro Max, like all the phones in the iPhone 12 family (the iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Mini), has a bunch of things going for it like a new flat-sided design reminiscent of the iPhone 5 ($40 at Back Market) and iPad Pro. It has support for 5G, an OLED screen with support for HDR, a ceramic shield covering, an A14 Bionic processor, support for MagSafe wireless charging and it can be submerged to a depth of 6 meters (just under 20 feet) for up to 30 minutes. If you want a deeper assessment of any of these features, take a look at my iPhone 12 and 12 Pro review.

Like

  • Premium design and build
  • Outstanding cameras
  • Great battery life
  • 5G support

Don’t Like

  • The large camera bump
  • The lack of iPadOS-like features

But at a starting price of $1,099 (£1,099, AU$1,849), or a hundred dollars more than the iPhone 12 Pro, this is the question: Are camera upgrades on the 12 Pro Max worth the extra money? The short answer is yes, but not just because of the camera.

If you want the largest screen on any iPhone ever made, the 12 Pro Max is worth the price. If you value having the longest battery life on any iPhone 12, the 12 Pro Max seems like an obvious choice. And yes, if you want to get every last drop of image quality out of your photos and videos, then the iPhone 12 Pro Max is definitely worth it and has earned CNET’s Editors’ Choice. 


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iPhone 12 Pro Max review: Filled to the brim

9:44

The iPhone 12 Pro Max has a gigantic screen

Despite being only 2 grams heavier than last year’s 11 Pro Max, the iPhone 12 Pro Max feels even more solid and well-built. The flat edges, the matte-etched glass back and stainless steel sides are another level of premium fit and finish. The review unit I tested was gold, and the polished sides looked like C-3PO on his best day. But make no mistake, this is a big phone. If you dropped it on someone there’s a chance they’d sustain a serious injury.

Defining all this premium bigness is a 6.7-inch OLED screen, which is larger than the 6.5-inch one found on the 11 Pro Max and XS Max ($1,100 at Boost Mobile). The new screen makes the 12 Pro Max a sliver taller and, along with those flat edges, gives the behemoth iPhone a tight robust look.

On the back of this chonky phone is a camera bump that’s thicker than an SD card. When the 12 Pro Max is on its back, there’s a noticeable gap between the phone and the surface it’s on. I realize most people are going to put a case on it, which will level things out.

The 12 Pro Max has the longest telephoto lens found on any iPhone

When Apple announced the iPhone 12 lineup there was a little confusion about which phones had which camera. But here’s how it all breaks down. All four phones have the same ultrawide angle and selfie cameras. All four phones have a faster f1.6 aperture lens on the main wide angle camera. That said, the wide-angle camera on the 12 Pro Max is different, which I’ll get to in a moment. The 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max also have a lidar sensor, which helps with autofocus in low-light for photos, video and slow motion as well as AR apps. Last, both the 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max have a third rear camera with a telephoto lens, but the lens on the 12 Pro Max is longer than the one on the 12 Pro.

At a 65-millimeter equivalent, the new telephoto lens on the 12 Pro Max has a 2.5x optical zoom. Compare that to the 52-millimeter equivalent telephoto lens on the 12 Pro, which has a 2x optical zoom. And that 0.5x extra goes a long way. It’s definitely nowhere close to the 5x optical zoom on the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra, but I was glad to have a little more reach on the iPhone.

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On the back of the 12 Pro is a new wide angle camera, a longer telephoto camera, an ultrawide-angle wide and a lidar sensor.


Patrick Holland/CNET

Taking photos where there isn’t a lot of light is a weakness of any camera. And the smaller the camera (like the ones on a phone) the more this weakness is amplified. The cameras on the iPhone 12 Pro Max seem built around the singular goal of taking outstanding photos and videos in medium and low-light situations.

One way Apple has addressed this is to give the main wide-angle camera on the 12 Pro Max a larger sensor. Combined with an f1.6 lens, the new sensor gets an 87% improvement in low-light capability, according to Apple. On paper that’s impressive. To help things further, the 12 Pro Max has sensor-based optical image stabilization instead of the lens-based OIS found on the 12, 12 Mini and 12 Pro. By stabilizing the sensor, Apple claims you gain the equivalent of a stop of light, which again, on paper is impressive.

For the most part, all these claims seem true. The Pro Max takes great photos in low light, but when compared to photos from the regular 12 Pro, the differences don’t jump out at you right away. And that’s less of a strike against the 12 Pro Max, and more of an indication of how good the cameras are on the iPhone 12 Pro. We’ll be going much more in-depth on photos and videos from both phones in an upcoming camera comparison.

night-reflection-12-pro-maxnight-reflection-12-pro-max

This is a Night Mode photo from the 12 Pro Max.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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The 2.5x optical zoom creates great natural-looking background blur here in this photo of an LED lamp.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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These next three photos were each taken with one of the rear cameras on the 12 Pro Max. This was taken with the main wide-angle camera.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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Here is a shot taken with the 2.5x optical zoom on the 12 Pro Max’s telephoto camera. It’s impressive how it handles the backlight of the sun.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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And here is the same scene taken with the ultrawide-angle camera. Look at the drama the perspective adds.


Patrick Holland/CNET

img-0358img-0358

Night Mode is now on the wide, ultra-wide and front-facing camera. This is a Night Mode selfie.


Patrick Holland/CNET

img-0302img-0302

This was taken with the phone’s main wide angle camera.


Patrick Holland/CNET

img-0301img-0301

Here are the same lights again at 2.5x.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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Here is another Night Mode shot taken with the 12 Pro Max.


Patrick Holland/CNET

sweater-12-pro-maxsweater-12-pro-max

This was taken indoors with mixed lighting on the main camera. The white balance looks a bit off.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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This photo of a building at sunset was taken at 5x digital zoom.


Patrick Holland/CNET

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There is a lot happening here. I used the 2.5x optical zoom to take a backlit photo of this cactus. I like the way the light made the needles look. And the natural bokeh is creamy and soft.


Patrick Holland/CNET

img-0441img-0441

These trees backlit by the sun really show the chops of the 12 Pro Max’s new wide-angle camera. It was able to capture the highlights on the trees without blowing them out to white. And there is minimal noise in the shadows.


Patrick Holland/CNET

If you’re on the fence between the 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max cameras, ask yourself if the additional size and heft of the Max is worth the benefits you gain in photography? For most people, they’re probably not and that’s largely because the 12 Pro also has a great all-around camera system. But for people like me, who want the best image quality out of a photo or video taken on a phone, then the 12 Pro Max is worth having in your pocket… if it fits.

One feature I’m excited about is Apple’s new ProRAW photo file, which provides the flexibility of a raw photo file but with the smarts of computational photography. Sadly, this feature doesn’t come out until later this year.


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Unboxing the iPhone 12 Pro Max and its nifty MagSafe…

8:54

MagSafe, iOS 14 and the Apple Pencil

Like the rest of the iPhone 12 family, the 12 Pro Max can take advantage of Apple’s MagSafe charging and accessories. Thanks to magnets and NFC, the phone can get the most efficient wireless charge when attached to a MagSafe charger. When the phone and charger connect, there is a satisfying slap.

Apple also makes the MagSafe Duo Charger, which can charge a phone and an Apple Watch at the same time. It costs $129, and folds up into a handy travel size. And yes, that seems expensive for a charger even though it was cool to use. The Apple Watch charging portion can be angled up.

But why stop at cases and chargers? What if you could connect an Apple Pencil to an iPhone 12 Pro Max? Technically, thanks to those magnets, you can. But sticking it to the back of the phone is about as much use as you’ll get from it since the 12 Pro Max, like all iPhones, doesn’t support the Apple Pencil. If there was ever an iPhone to use an Apple Pencil on, it’s this one. 

p1003051p1003051

Patrick Holland/CNET

I wished Apple took more advantage of the 12 Pro Max’s 6.7-inch screen. iPadOS optimizes iOS for the larger screens of the iPad ($300 at Back Market) lineup. What about an “iOS Max” that would allow me to use iPad software features such as Split View on the 12 Pro Max? Or support the use of an Apple Pencil? An iOS that took full advantage of the Max’s size would be another benefit to set it apart from the other iPhones Apple sells. And, seriously, a MagSafe Apple Pencil would be a killer accessory.

The 12 Pro Max has big battery energy

The sleeper feature on the 12 Pro Max is its large battery. Apple doesn’t say how big the battery is, but during the week I had the phone, it made it through a day and a half without a problem. Over the weekend, it made it all the way through Friday, and by Saturday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. it still had 40% left.

I ran a battery test where the phone plays a looped video in airplane mode. Apple’s website says that the 12 Pro Max should last 20 hours doing this. In my test, it lasted 19 hours, 52 minutes. So basically as expected. We’ll be running more battery tests over the coming weeks, so bookmark this review for updates.

The iPhone 12 Pro Max is powered by the A14 Bionic chip. And it’s peppy and fast. The A14 chip is as much about giving you great performance now as it is about giving you great performance through years of iOS updates. In benchmark tests for performance the 12 Pro Max was on par with (not surprisingly) the iPhone 12, 12 Mini and 12 Pro. All of the new iPhones hold the distinction of having the most powerful processors in the phones we’ve tested. 

iPhone 12 specs compared to iPhone 12 Mini, iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max

Apple iPhone 12 Apple iPhone 12 Mini Apple iPhone 12 Pro Apple iPhone 12 Pro Max
Display size, resolution 6.1-inch OLED; 2,532×1,170 pixels 5.4-inch OLED; 2,340×1,080 pixels 6.1-inch OLED; 2,532×1,170 pixels 6.7-inch OLED; 2,778×1,284 pixels
Pixel density 460ppi 476ppi 460ppi 458ppi
Dimensions (inches) 5.78×2.82×0.29 inches 5.18×2.53×0.29 inches 5.78×2.82×0.29 inches 6.33×3.07×0.29 inches
Dimensions (millimeters) 146.7×71.5×7.4mm 131.5×64.2×7.4mm 146.7×71.5×7.4mm 160.8×78.1×7.4mm
Weight (ounces, grams) 5.78 oz.; 164g 4.76 oz.; 135g 6.66 oz.; 189g 8.03 oz.; 228g
Mobile software iOS 14 iOS 14 iOS 14 iOS 14
Camera 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide) 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide) 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), 12-megapixel (telephoto) 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), 12-megapixel (telephoto)
Front-facing camera 12-megapixel 12-megapixel 12-megapixel 12-megapixel
Video capture 4K 4K 4K 4K
Processor Apple A14 Bionic Apple A14 Bionic Apple A14 Bionic Apple A14 Bionic
Storage 64GB, 128GB, 256GB 64GB, 128GB, 256GB 128GB, 256GB, 512GB 128GB, 256GB, 512GB
RAM Undisclosed Undisclosed Undisclosed Undisclosed
Expandable storage No No No No
Battery Undisclosed; Apple lists 15 hours of video playback Undisclosed; Apple lists 15 hours of video playback Undisclosed; Apple lists 17 hours of video playback Undisclosed; Apple lists 17 hours of video playback
Fingerprint sensor No (Face ID) No (Face ID) No (Face ID) No (Face ID)
Connector Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning
Headphone jack No No No No
Special features 5G enabled; MagSafe; water resistant (IP68); wireless charging; dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM) 5G enabled; MagSafe; water resistant (IP68); wireless charging; dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM) Lidar scanner; 5G enabled; MagSafe; water resistant (IP68); wireless charging; dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM) Lidar scanner; 5G enabled; MagSafe; water resistant (IP68); wireless charging; dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM)
Price off-contract (USD) $829 (64GB), $879 (128GB), $979 (256GB) $729 (64GB), $779 (128GB), $879 (256GB) $999 (128GB), $1,099 (256GB), $1,299 (512GB) $1,099 (128GB), $1,199 (256GB), $1,399 (512GB)
Price (GBP) £799 (64GB), £849 (128GB), £949 (256GB) £699 (64GB), £749 (128GB), £849 (256GB) £999 (128GB), £1,099 (256GB), £1,299 (512GB) £1,099 (128GB), £1,199 (256GB), £1,399 (512GB)
Price (AUD) AU$1,349 (64GB), AU$1,429 (128GB), AU$1,599 (256GB) AU$1,199 (64GB), AU$1,279 (128GB), AU$1,449 (256GB) AU$1,699 (128GB), AU$1,869 (256GB), AU$2,219 (512GB) AU$1,849 (128GB), AU$2,019 (256GB), AU$2,369 (512GB)

First published Nov. 9.

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Five big lessons experts say Canada should learn from COVID-19: – Abbotsford News

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In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, The Canadian Press interviewed a group of leading Canadian experts in disease control and epidemiology and asked them what should be done to reduce the harms the next time a germ with similar destructive potential emerges. Here are the five most important lessons they offered:

1. Socio-economic and health inequities have made some people more vulnerable

COVID-19 has exposed fault lines in the Canadian society by showing how long-standing inequities contributed to higher rates of infections and mortality, said Steffanie Strathdee, a Toronto-born epidemiologist at the University of California in San Diego.

“The people who are, by and large, getting COVID are people who are poor, or of-colour, or living in poor socio-economic conditions,” Strathdee said.

In an analysis of COVID-19 deaths between March and July, Statistics Canada found that death rates because of the virus were double in Canadian neighbourhoods where more than 25 per cent of the people are members of visible minorities compared to neighbourhoods where minorities are less than one per cent of the people.

Strathdee said people in many areas in Canada have limited health services.

“In my sister and mother’s region of Stouffville (a suburb of Toronto), it’s very, very difficult to get a doctor,” she said.

“What we need to do is invest in our public health and health care infrastructure, because this isn’t going to be the last pandemic we see.”

University of British Columbia professor Erica Frank, a doctor and population-health expert, said almost all those who have died because of COVID-19 had pre-existing risk factors, including age.

“Not paying enough attention to reduction of chronic-disease risk has greatly increased the cohort of susceptible people to COVID,” she said.

She said there is a need to spend money on public health systems and on social determinants of health, such as housing, to decrease sickness and death.

2. Canada’s division of health-care responsibilities is inefficient

The disconnect between federal and provincial or territorial actions to fight the pandemic is getting in the way of an effective response, said Donald Sheppard. He’s the chair of the department of microbiology and immunology in the faculty of medicine at McGill University and a member of Canada’s COVID-19 therapeutics task force.

For instance, Sheppard said, after Eli Lilly’s COVID-19 antibody treatment was approved by Health Canada, bought by the federal government and greenlit by the federal therapeutics task force, British Columbia health authorities decided to reject the federal approval of the medication.

He said there many more examples, including the handling of long-term care homes.

“Quebec is screaming they want money but they’re refusing to sign on to the minimum standards of long-term care,” he said.

He said there have been poor communication and a lot of territorialism since the beginning of the pandemic.

“There should be a time when it’s all hands on deck and we don’t play games,” he said. “That didn’t happen. We saw these fragmentations between the provinces and the feds leading to, frankly, people dying.”

3. Centralized decision-making in health care stifles innovation

Sheppard said the Canadian health care system can’t be nimble because federal and provincial governments have seized control of decisions on how to handle the pandemic.

“During a new disease like a pandemic, when we’re learning about things, the people on the ground actually are learning a lot faster than the people sitting in Ottawa, Quebec City or Toronto,” he said.

He said Canadian businesses and universities have been struggling to get approval for testing strategies that use rapid tests to reopen safely.

“The way that the ministries of health are set up, they actually make it incredibly difficult to set those type of things up, because they hold on to all the power with a stranglehold.”

Sheppard said there’s no process private entities can use to launch innovative testing programs.

“The dogma from the ministries of health are simple: What we’re doing is right. There is no other better way to do anything … therefore we will not help anybody do anything different than what we’re doing. And anything other than that is a threat to our authority,” he said. “That’s the mentality, and it’s just killed innovation in the health-care setting.”

4. Lack of coordination stymied research

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how crucial research is to inform health decisions, said Francois Lamontagne, a clinician-scientist at the University of Sherbrooke.

He said Canadian scientists have played prominent roles scientifically during the pandemic but recruiting patients to participate in clinical trials has been a challenge due to lack of coordination.

“There have been a lot of studies launched. A lot of those studies overlapped,” he said.

He said having too many studies at the same time has resulted in shortages of suitable patients who are willing to be subjects in clinical trials.

“This, essentially, dilutes all of the studies and you end up enrolling very few people in too many studies.”

Lamontagne said the United Kingdom has been the locomotive of the world in enrolling patients in clinical trials because research is an integral part of the country’s national health system.

“It’s not something that happens in a silo. It’s part of the (National Health Service),” he said. “This led them to build the infrastructure … And then there’s an effort to co-ordinate and prioritize studies so they do one study and they do it well and they get the answers very quickly.”

He said creating better research infrastructure and coordination should be a priority for Canada.

“This is a criticism directed at me as well. I am part of ‘us’ — researchers. We have to get our act together and there has to be an effort of coordination.”

Lamontagne said health research in Canada is largely funded by the federal government whereas health care is a provincial jurisdiction and both levels need to co-operate.

“The stakes are so important for not only how we respond to pandemics now and in the future, but also for the sustainability of a public health-care system,” he said.

5. Good messaging and communication matter

Strathdee said good science communication with the public is important to address misinformation regarding the novel coronaviruses and its vaccines.

“We need for people to understand that science and medicine don’t have all the answers all the time, that we’re learning just like everybody else,” she said.

Strathdee said guidelines will be updated as more data become available and that’s what happened when more data showed that face masks reduced the risk of COVID-19 transmission.

She said government officials should be trained in health literacy.

John Brownstein, a Montreal-born Harvard University epidemiologist, said minority communities, including Indigenous communities, tend to have more mistrust in vaccines and for good historical reasons.

“We got to figure out how to improve communication and improve confidence,” he said.

Strathdee said it’s critical for politicians and public health officials to be honest with the public by “making people aware that, you know, it could get worse before it gets better, and that they need to stay the course.”

She also said people need to understand that if segments of the population are left behind in vaccination, like prisoners and homeless people, that will put everyone at risk.

She said Canada did a good job in detecting COVID-19 cases because it was hit hard by SARS.

“We have to make sure that we don’t unlearn those lessons going forward and that we build upon what we’ve learned from COVID and prepare for the next pandemic.”

Coronavirus

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Five big lessons experts say Canada should learn from COVID-19: – Coast Mountain News

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In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, The Canadian Press interviewed a group of leading Canadian experts in disease control and epidemiology and asked them what should be done to reduce the harms the next time a germ with similar destructive potential emerges. Here are the five most important lessons they offered:

1. Socio-economic and health inequities have made some people more vulnerable

COVID-19 has exposed fault lines in the Canadian society by showing how long-standing inequities contributed to higher rates of infections and mortality, said Steffanie Strathdee, a Toronto-born epidemiologist at the University of California in San Diego.

“The people who are, by and large, getting COVID are people who are poor, or of-colour, or living in poor socio-economic conditions,” Strathdee said.

In an analysis of COVID-19 deaths between March and July, Statistics Canada found that death rates because of the virus were double in Canadian neighbourhoods where more than 25 per cent of the people are members of visible minorities compared to neighbourhoods where minorities are less than one per cent of the people.

Strathdee said people in many areas in Canada have limited health services.

“In my sister and mother’s region of Stouffville (a suburb of Toronto), it’s very, very difficult to get a doctor,” she said.

“What we need to do is invest in our public health and health care infrastructure, because this isn’t going to be the last pandemic we see.”

University of British Columbia professor Erica Frank, a doctor and population-health expert, said almost all those who have died because of COVID-19 had pre-existing risk factors, including age.

“Not paying enough attention to reduction of chronic-disease risk has greatly increased the cohort of susceptible people to COVID,” she said.

She said there is a need to spend money on public health systems and on social determinants of health, such as housing, to decrease sickness and death.

2. Canada’s division of health-care responsibilities is inefficient

The disconnect between federal and provincial or territorial actions to fight the pandemic is getting in the way of an effective response, said Donald Sheppard. He’s the chair of the department of microbiology and immunology in the faculty of medicine at McGill University and a member of Canada’s COVID-19 therapeutics task force.

For instance, Sheppard said, after Eli Lilly’s COVID-19 antibody treatment was approved by Health Canada, bought by the federal government and greenlit by the federal therapeutics task force, British Columbia health authorities decided to reject the federal approval of the medication.

He said there many more examples, including the handling of long-term care homes.

“Quebec is screaming they want money but they’re refusing to sign on to the minimum standards of long-term care,” he said.

He said there have been poor communication and a lot of territorialism since the beginning of the pandemic.

“There should be a time when it’s all hands on deck and we don’t play games,” he said. “That didn’t happen. We saw these fragmentations between the provinces and the feds leading to, frankly, people dying.”

3. Centralized decision-making in health care stifles innovation

Sheppard said the Canadian health care system can’t be nimble because federal and provincial governments have seized control of decisions on how to handle the pandemic.

“During a new disease like a pandemic, when we’re learning about things, the people on the ground actually are learning a lot faster than the people sitting in Ottawa, Quebec City or Toronto,” he said.

He said Canadian businesses and universities have been struggling to get approval for testing strategies that use rapid tests to reopen safely.

“The way that the ministries of health are set up, they actually make it incredibly difficult to set those type of things up, because they hold on to all the power with a stranglehold.”

Sheppard said there’s no process private entities can use to launch innovative testing programs.

“The dogma from the ministries of health are simple: What we’re doing is right. There is no other better way to do anything … therefore we will not help anybody do anything different than what we’re doing. And anything other than that is a threat to our authority,” he said. “That’s the mentality, and it’s just killed innovation in the health-care setting.”

4. Lack of coordination stymied research

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how crucial research is to inform health decisions, said Francois Lamontagne, a clinician-scientist at the University of Sherbrooke.

He said Canadian scientists have played prominent roles scientifically during the pandemic but recruiting patients to participate in clinical trials has been a challenge due to lack of coordination.

“There have been a lot of studies launched. A lot of those studies overlapped,” he said.

He said having too many studies at the same time has resulted in shortages of suitable patients who are willing to be subjects in clinical trials.

“This, essentially, dilutes all of the studies and you end up enrolling very few people in too many studies.”

Lamontagne said the United Kingdom has been the locomotive of the world in enrolling patients in clinical trials because research is an integral part of the country’s national health system.

“It’s not something that happens in a silo. It’s part of the (National Health Service),” he said. “This led them to build the infrastructure … And then there’s an effort to co-ordinate and prioritize studies so they do one study and they do it well and they get the answers very quickly.”

He said creating better research infrastructure and coordination should be a priority for Canada.

“This is a criticism directed at me as well. I am part of ‘us’ — researchers. We have to get our act together and there has to be an effort of coordination.”

Lamontagne said health research in Canada is largely funded by the federal government whereas health care is a provincial jurisdiction and both levels need to co-operate.

“The stakes are so important for not only how we respond to pandemics now and in the future, but also for the sustainability of a public health-care system,” he said.

5. Good messaging and communication matter

Strathdee said good science communication with the public is important to address misinformation regarding the novel coronaviruses and its vaccines.

“We need for people to understand that science and medicine don’t have all the answers all the time, that we’re learning just like everybody else,” she said.

Strathdee said guidelines will be updated as more data become available and that’s what happened when more data showed that face masks reduced the risk of COVID-19 transmission.

She said government officials should be trained in health literacy.

John Brownstein, a Montreal-born Harvard University epidemiologist, said minority communities, including Indigenous communities, tend to have more mistrust in vaccines and for good historical reasons.

“We got to figure out how to improve communication and improve confidence,” he said.

Strathdee said it’s critical for politicians and public health officials to be honest with the public by “making people aware that, you know, it could get worse before it gets better, and that they need to stay the course.”

She also said people need to understand that if segments of the population are left behind in vaccination, like prisoners and homeless people, that will put everyone at risk.

She said Canada did a good job in detecting COVID-19 cases because it was hit hard by SARS.

“We have to make sure that we don’t unlearn those lessons going forward and that we build upon what we’ve learned from COVID and prepare for the next pandemic.”

Coronavirus

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Keep Your iPhone 12 and Its Accessories Away From Pacemakers – Lifehacker

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Photo: Christian Dina (Shutterstock)

If you or someone you know has an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), you may want to avoid using an iPhone 12. According to a recent study in the Heart Rhythm Journal, the iPhone 12 and its accessories can interfere with an ICD’s behavior, and even stop it from working.

The study found several components within the iPhone 12 can “potentially inhibit lifesaving therapy in a patient particularly while carrying the phone in upper pockets.” This warning applies to all iPhone 12 devices, including the iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Mini, iPhone 12 Max, and iPhone 12 Max Plus. The iPhone 12’s MagSafe accessories are also a risk, specifically the MagSafe Charger and MagSafe Duo Charger, due to their magnets and NFC radios.

According to the study, the magnetic charging coils and RF-emitting components in these products are strong enough to interfere with an ICD’s internal mechanisms, which respond to magnetic fields. Researchers observed immediate suspension of the ICD’s heart-regulating operations if an iPhone “was brought close to the ICD over the left chest area.” The interference “persisted for the duration of the test.”

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This poses serious health risks, including the possibility of heart failure or cardiac arrest. To help inform users of the potential risks, Apple updated its iPhone 12 health and safety documentation with new guidelines based on the report’s suggestions. Apple now recommends users keep their iPhone 12 and MagSafe accessories more than six inches away from their chest at all times, and more than 12 inches away if your phone is wirelessly charging. Definitely don’t put your iPhone in your shirt or jacket’s breast pocket.

While these warnings are for the iPhone 12 line and its magnetic accessories specifically, they’re not the only products that can affect medical devices. A similar case study shows smartwatches and fitness trackers can interfere with ICDs if they come within 2.4 centimeters of the ICD’s location in a patient’s chest. The iPhone 12 interference is more severe—especially while charging wirelessly—but you should take caution using any smart devices near someone with an ICD.

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