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Review: Reeb’s SST Does it Differently

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Descending

Short-travel bikes can often act a bit confused, almost like they want to party but they also can’t hold their liquor, end up causing a big scene, and you end up needing days to recover. Sound familiar? You think it’ll be fun, and it is for a while until those decisions start to catch up with you, and then you’re upside down in the rhubarb. The SST can party harder than most, though, and you’re less likely to end up with a hangover and no memory of what happened thanks to its easy-going suspension and handling.

Let’s talk suspension first, with Reeb’s flex-pivot Horst Link-ish system doing some very good things on the trail. It’s quite active and supple over small impacts that you might not see but that definitely affect traction, and that goes a long way to make the SST feel more stuck to the ground than most bikes with this little suspension. That’s a big help when it’s really wet, really dry, or anytime traction is iffy, be it cruising down a section of tame singletrack at maximum pace or creeping into a vertical rock roll that demands zero speed and all the concentration. This isn’t the bike for those do-or-die moves, of course, but I’m not here to tell you how to live your life or that the SST doesn’t love to roll the dice every now and then.

When you do roll the dice on a short-travel bike, you might sometimes find that the geometry lets you get into situations that the suspension can’t get you out of. Or vice versa. That’s not the case with the SST, however, with the opposite end of the stroke being nearly as impressive. There’s more than enough ramp-up with the RockShox air shock that my test bike arrived with, and there were times when it felt like I had an extra 10 or 15mm of help, especially on fast sections of trail with big compressions and holes when you’re just trying to hang on for dear life. Reeb has done a hell of a lot with just 120mm of travel.

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There’s plenty of life to the SST as well, as you’d expect given that it’s on the shorter side of the travel spectrum. Apply all the usual cliches here about it being playful and all that, but I think a big factor is actually how sure-footed the bike is; that stability gives you the trust to do those side hits and useless but fun moves, much like how a long, slack enduro bike can also be surprisingly playful for the same reasons. If you’re confident on a bike, you’ll relax and have more fun.

On the handling front, Reeb could have easily made the SST a too-slack, too-sloppy short-travel bike that’s fun in a few places and a burden in most… But that’s not what they did. Instead, the SST feels more middle-of-the-road; it has the stability and poise to not feel too on-edge when the trail gets really steep and sketchy but doesn’t mind tame, meandering descents either. The first compliment comes from that classic in-the-bike positioning that most 120mm-travel rigs don’t provide, as well as the 140mm-travel Pike that’s an ideal match for the SST. Far from feeling unbalanced, the 140mm fork suits the SST’s intentions and I don’t think I’d want more or less travel up front.

If I had to look for some criticisms, which is exactly what we’re supposed to be doing here, there are faster, more enjoyable bikes if your rides involve a ton of smooth, rolling terrain rather than sustained descents. Yes, the SST is a decent all-around machine everywhere, but it’s far better suited to rougher trails and longer downhills where the bike’s active suspension and forgiving nature work for your benefit.

How Does It Compare?

A few short-travel bikes I’ve spent a bunch of time on recently were the Fourstroke LT from BMC, Allied’s very impressive BC40, and the new aluminum Norco Fluid. Those three span a pretty wide range of intended use, with the 130mm Fluid and 120mm Allied both being more in line with the SST than the racier and much less forgiving BMC. Obviously, with low weight and carbon fiber in the recipe, Allied is taking a very different approach than Reeb, but there are some interesting similarities on the trail regardless of frame material and intentions.

If you’re looking to do some racing, it’s going to be the BC40 for sure and that’s not a surprise at all. Likewise, if you’re more into covering ground quickly – the BC40 is a rocketship – but either bike could also be your short-travel trail bike that’s ready for more. While the ingredients couldn’t be more different, the two bikes handle similarly on the trail; both are remarkably planted through any and all corners, and both instill more confidence than you might expect. They also share some rear-suspension attributes, although the BC40 feels sportier and more rewarding on the gas.

As for Norco’s Fluid, it has a bit more rear-wheel-travel and is aluminum rather than steel, but it has a similar personality in that both it and the SST are solid, ready-for-anything trail rigs. Obviously, there’s a pretty wide price delta between these three bikes but, that aside, I’d recommend the Reeb for anyone who appreciates something different, the Norco if you want the most bike-for-your-buck, and the Allied if you’re a closet cross-country dork who wants more bike but doesn’t want to go up the climbers any slower.

 

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Win a Copy of The Callisto Protocol Just By Watching s0leb DIE – Cinelinx

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We are currently reviewing and doing a livestream of the horrifying title The Callisto Protocol! To show how much we love you all, we are giving away a PS5 copy of the game on tomorrow nights livestream of the game!

For your chance to win a copy of the game, follow the steps below:

  • FOLLOW CINELINX ON TWITTER
  • FOLLOW S0LEB ON TWITTER
  • MAKE SURE TO HEAD TO THE 2ND OPINION PRO YOUTUBE PAGE AT 9PM CST TOMORROW NIGHT (12/5/22)

That’s it! We also want to say thank you to Striking Distance Studios for letting us review this title! Our review will be coming soon so be on the lookout!

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THE JOURNEY SO FAR | PART’S 1 THROUGH 3 ARE LIVE!

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ASUS confirms Radeon RX 7900 XTX/XT TUF Gaming clock speeds

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ASUS Radeon RX 7900 Series TUF Gaming specs now official

ASUS became the first board partner to fully confirm the clock speeds of their custom Radeon RX 7900 GPUs.

As reported last month, ASUS was the first company to unveil its custom Radeon RX 7900 GPUs. These TUF Gaming cards are based on 7900 XTX and RX 7900 XT SKUs with a custom 3.6-slot thick triple-fan design also equipped with three 8-pin power connectors. ASUS has now confirmed the clock speeds that will be applied to each of the four models that were announced.

ASUS official specs list the so-called ‘default’ mode and ‘OC’ mode. The latter is the highest official spec that can be applied through ASUS software called GPU Tweak. For this reason, it should not be considered an ‘out of the box’ spec, but rather the highest validated clock speed that is officially supported and will not affect the warranty.

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As a reminder, Radeon RX 7900 XT default game clock is 2300 MHz and boost clock goes up to 2500 MHz. For Radeon RX 7900 XT GPU this is 2000 MHz and 2400 MHz respectively.

ASUS TUF RX 7900 Series Specs, Source: ASUS

ASUS TUF Gaming Radeon RX 7900 XTX OC Edition

  • OC mode:
    • up to 2615 MHz (Boost Clock) +4.6%
    • up to 2455 MHz (Game Clock) +6.7%
  • Default mode:
    • up to 2565 MHz (Boost Clock) +2.6%
    • up to 2395 MHz (Game Clock) +4.1%

ASUS TUF Gaming Radeon RX 7900 XT OC Edition 

  • OC mode:
    • up to 2535 MHz (Boost Clock) +5.6%
    • up to 2175 MHz (Game Clock) +8.7%
  • Default mode:
    • up to 2500 MHz (Boost Clock) +4.1%
    • up to 2130 MHz (Game Clock) +6.5%

The OC Edition of the Radeon RX 7900 XTX TUF Gaming GPU has a default clock at 2565 MHz, which represents 2.6% (boost) factory overclocking. However, in OC mode the frequency goes 4.6% above the AMD specs. Meanwhile, the RX 7900 XT TUF OC model has slightly higher overclock. By default, is ships with 2500 MHz clock, so 4.1% higher above the specs, while the OC mode applies 5.6% overclock through the software.

Game clocks are even higher, but with proper cooling one is more likely to see the GPU reaching boost clock rather than game clock. Overall, these performance upgrades are similar to Radeon RX 6900 XT TUF OC Gaming GPUs, but it is worth noting that ASUS did have a higher tier TUF TOP Edition with even higher overclock.

Source: ASUS 7900 XT TUF OC, ASUS 7900 XTX TUF OC

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Makeover: How to achieve that perfect flick, no matter your eye shape

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Nadia Albano offers up her tips on how to achieve a classic look

A winged eyeliner is a classic look loved by many, and surprisingly easy to do.

Here are a few easy steps, and tips, to help you get that perfect flick no matter your eye shape.

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Step 1: PrimerThe first and most important step is to prep the eyelid with a smudge proof base. I?m using Charlotte Tilbury?s Matte ? Eyes to Mesmerize in Nude Cashmere because it goes on smoothly, is long wearing and lasts up to 12 hours. Photo: Nadia Albano. For Nadia’s makeover column on Dec. 4, 2022. [PNG Merlin Archive]
Step 1: PrimerThe first and most important step is to prep the eyelid with a smudge proof base. I?m using Charlotte Tilbury?s Matte ? Eyes to Mesmerize in Nude Cashmere because it goes on smoothly, is long wearing and lasts up to 12 hours. Photo: Nadia Albano. For Nadia’s makeover column on Dec. 4, 2022. [PNG Merlin Archive] Photo by Nadia Albano /jpg

Step 1: Primer

The first and most important step is to prep the eyelid with a smudge proof base. I’m using Charlotte Tilbury’s Matte — Eyes to Mesmerize in Nude Cashmere because it goes on smoothly, is long wearing and lasts up to 12 hours.

Step 2: Liner

I used Smashbox — Always On Waterproof Gel Eyeliner in Fishnet to draw on my liner. tarting at the middle of my eyelid, I traced a thin line along my lash, which progressively grew thicker toward the outer corner of my eye. I then connected the line from the inner corner to the middle of the eye. The key to a perfect liner is to use short and clean strokes, a sharp eyeliner and a fine angled liner brush to extend the outer wing.

Tip: For hooded eyes try creating the outer wing where the hood starts first and work your way inward. For round eyes start from the outer corner of the eye and create a sharper angle toward the middle of the lid. For small eyes try keeping your liner and wing thin and short. Use a skin toned eyeliner to draw a line just below the wing and to tight line, making the eyes appear larger and brighter.

Step 3: Mascara and brows

Curling the lashes and coating them with black mascara will enhance the look, as will filling in your eyebrows. I’m using Benefit Cosmetics — Roller Lash Curling Mascara in black and on my brows, I used Benefit — 24-Hour Brow Setter Clean Brow Gel with Benefit — Precisely My Brow Pencil in #4.

Step 4:

I lightly contoured my face with Tarte Amazonion Clay Waterproof Bronzing Powder, then swept a hint of Benefit Cosmetics — Dandelion blush on my cheeks. To pull the look together, I lined my lips with NYX — Suede Matte Lip Liner in Sandstorm then layered it with Glo Skin Beauty — Cream Glaze Crayon in Chiffon.

The completed look.
The completed look. Photo by Nadia Albano /jpg

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