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Rose Ottawa giving away free gender affirming gear

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Rose Ottawa giving away free gender affirming gear

Rose Ottawa, through its Gender Affirming Gear Program, is giving away free gender-affirming gear and clothing that includes gaffs, binders, packers and makeup.

To access the program you must be 16 years or older and you can apply through this link.

If you are younger than 16 you will need to seek parental permission to apply to this program and proof will be required. If you cannot get permission due to safety concerns, contact transprograms@roseottawa.org.

“The Gender Affirming Gear Program is funded through the courteous sponsorship of MAX Ottawa, an organization providing guys-into-guys and other 2SLGBTQIA+ community members in the Ottawa community offering support, health, and education services. Each individual request is allotted $50, which can usually provide 1 to 3 items depending on what is being requested.

A ROSE, we consider gender affirming gear to be anything that helps affirm one’s gender identity by contributing to one’s gender presentation.

Traditionally this means things like binders, gaffs, STPs, and breast forms, amongst others. Our definition is more holistic, and also includes things such as beard stains, makeup, and standard affirming clothing.

We believe that affirming gear also serves as harm reduction. Trans, non-binary, and gender diverse youth are at significant risk for mental health complications including the risk of suicide.

Affirming gear can help reduce dysphoria and is invaluable at helping reduce dysphoria-related stress,” read a statement from ROSE Ottawa.

A Stand To Pee (STP) is a device that enables the user to pee whilst standing in public washrooms or in the privacy of their own home. Some people find that being able to use public urinals without detection (passing) is integral to their identity or safety, and some just like the convenience of easily being able to urinate while standing.

Gaff is underwear designed specifically for tucking. Tucking is the practice of arranging and supporting external genitals between the legs via clothing like gaffs. Some women, transfeminine persons and femme-of-centre choose to wear a gaff underneath their day-to-day clothing in order to smooth out the appearance of their pelvic area. There are other ways to tuck, such as using sports tape to tape the genitals in place.

A chest binder is a garment designed to compress one’s chest and is also sometimes called a compression vest. People most often wear their binder underneath their everyday clothes, while some people may wear their binder as a shirt in and of itself. People bind for many reasons, binding can be part of one’s gender transition, gender play, or as part of post-top surgery recovery.

Compression shorts, sometimes also referred to as binding shorts or binding briefs, are a style of shorts that a person wears underneath their everyday clothes, in order to provide compression for the lower part of the body. They help to smooth out the lines of hips and bums. People often wear binding shorts as part of their gender transition, gender expression, or gender play.

 

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Bombardier opens new maintenance station at Farnborough, U.K. airport

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MONTREAL – Bombardier Inc. says it is opening a new European maintenance station located at the Farnborough, U.K. airport.

The new location is meant to provide light scheduled and unscheduled maintenance and support for grounded aircraft.

It brings Bombardier’s worldwide number of line maintenance stations to nine.

The Montreal-based maker of business jets also has service centres located in areas such as London, Berlin and Paris.

It says its mobile response teams around the world are all equipped to quickly support Bombardier Learjet, Challenger and Global business jets.

Paul Sislian, executive vice-president of aftermarket services and strategy for Bombardier, says the addition of the Farnborough station demonstrates the company’s commitment to providing more resources and increased flexibility to clients closer to their base of operations.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 22, 2024.

Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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Sleep Country to be acquired by Fairfax Financial Holdings for $1.7 billion

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TORONTO – Sleep Country Canada Holdings Inc. says it has agreed to be sold to Fairfax Financial Holdings Limited for around $1.7 billion.

The deal would see a subsidiary of the financial holding company acquire all issued and outstanding common shares of Sleep Country for $35 per share.

The sale is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2024, subject to court approval and other customary conditions. Once completed, Sleep Country says it will apply to have its common shares delisted from the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Sleep Country president and CEO Stewart Schaefer says the transaction “clearly demonstrates the value and strength of our brands and organization.”

The company’s co-founder Christine Magee, who chaired a special committee of independent directors that oversaw the negotiation, says the deal provides “certainty of significant and immediate value to shareholders.”

Prem Watsa, chairman and chief executive of Fairfax, says it looks forward to working with Schaefer and the entire Sleep Country team “to further develop this remarkable Canadian success story over the long term.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 22, 2024.

Companies in this story: (TSX:ZZZ, TSX:FFH)

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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Canada’s athletes began their Olympic journeys from humble beginnings

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Parents, siblings and love of sport, although not necessarily their own Olympic sport at first, is a common origin story of how Canada’s athletes got started in their chosen sport.

A capsule look at some beginnings:

Tammara Thibeault, Shawinigan, Que., boxing

“I got into boxing when I was nine. My dad was a CFL player, a wide receiver with the Saskatchewan Roughriders. During his off-season, he’d go to the boxing club to stay in shape. He dragged his three kids along at the time and I fell in love with the sport.”

Phil (Wizard) Kim, Vancouver, breaking

“I started breaking because there was a local crew called the Now or Never Crew and they were performing in front of the art gallery in Vancouver, which is a very common busking spot. I saw it, it blew my mind. I was like ‘that would totally impress people. I could get girls with that.’ One of them actually came to my school. They were teaching hip-hop choreography, but I went up to him and I asked him if he taught breaking. He said yes and gave me a card.”

Eric Peters, Ottawa, archery

“I was a nerdy kid who played a bunch of video games and read a bunch of books and thought it was really cool. I decided I wanted to do this and then I found out it was in the Olympics. I was like ‘OK, I guess I really want to do this now.'”

Katie Vincent, Mississauga, Ont., sprint canoe

“I got into canoeing at the Mississauga Canoe Club, which is the local canoe club near my house. It was just their summer camp that my parents put my brother and I into when I was around 10. We’ve been members ever since, and it’s gotten me from summer camp to the Olympics.

Aaron Brown, Toronto, track and field

“The common denominator with all the sports that I did was that I was fast. It was a natural progression for me to get into track. I did soccer, I did football, I played basketball, a little bit of volleyball, some tee ball, and then track just for fun. When my club coach in high school Bill Stephens saw me run, he said, ‘hey, I think you should take this seriously and come up from a club team because I think you can go pretty far.'”

Fay De Fazio Ebert, Toronto, skateboarding

“I did track and cross-country when I was in elementary school. There was a March break lesson at Impact Skate Club. We went and we bought a board right after because I felt so connected to it. I don’t remember the exact feeling, but I remember feeling I’ve done it before. People were asking ‘has she done this before?’ and I said ‘No, I haven’t.'”

Sarah Mitton, Brooklyn, N.S., shot put

“I got into shot putting in junior high school. It was kind of the next sport on the docket and I was a super-athletic kid. Went out to a local competition and I ended up doing really well. This coach came up to me and she was like, ‘who are you? we need to get you throwing the shot put.’ I remember having to beg my mom to let me join like this track club after like one day of track and field.”

Felix Dolci, Laval, Que., gymnastics

“I started doing many sports such as hockey, soccer. I had too much energy. My mom said ‘you need something else. Something that is more demanding.’ She put me in gymnastics because she was a gymnast when she was younger. She thought it was a great idea because I was jumping everywhere on the walls.”

Charles Philibert-Thiboutot, Quebec City, track and field

“I tried all sports. The common denominator for all of those was that I was the quick one, or the one that never got tired. Against my will, my phys-ed teacher put me in cross-country and track every year in high school. That’s the sport I hated the most. I would rather run after a ball. By my last year of high school, it was pretty obvious the one sport I had the most talent in was track and field and middle-distance running.”

Olivia Apps, Lindsay, Ont., rugby

“I started playing in Grade 10 at high school. I played soccer all my life. Growing up, I actually wanted to go to the Olympics for soccer or for hockey, and then I found rugby. Anyone who plays rugby would say the same thing, the off-field environment and the passion for the game is pretty addictive.”

Cam Levins, Black Creek, B.C., marathon

“I started running, my parents would say as soon as I could walk. My first actual race was a short cross-country race in second grade. It was a 2k loop in our area and we got to race with the third graders. It’s like their last race of the year, and they let second graders do it. I really just wanted to do every sort of sport I could. I had an older brother, who was also doing it and quite good at it, and so I wanted to do everything he did as well. I ended up joining a local track club in seventh grade.”

Sanoa Dempfle-Olin, Tofino, B.C., surfing

“I went into surfing because of my oldest sister and my mom. My mom, she loved the ocean and she liked surfing when she got out there. My sister got into it. Because she’s almost three years older than me she kind of helped me get out there and anything she was doing, I wanted to keep up and do it as well.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 22, 2024.



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