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Russia ready for negotiations with NASA on moon exploration projects – MENAFN.COM

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(MENAFN – The Peninsula) QNA Moscow: Russia’s Roscosmos is ready for negotiations with NASA on moon exploration projects and invited the leadership of the American organization to discuss the projects, but has not yet received a response, Kommersant reported.

At the same time, cooperation on lunar projects could “become a serious factor for the interaction of the two countries in difficult times,” said Sergey Savelyev, Deputy Director-General of Roscosmos for International Cooperation.

“Ambitious projects related to the exploration of the Moon could become a serious factor for the interaction of Russia and the US in this difficult time, he added. 

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Tesla’s Musk earns $770M in stock options, company confirms

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DETROIT — Tesla confirmed Thursday that CEO Elon Musk will get the first tranche worth nearly $770 million of a stock-based compensation package triggered by the company meeting several financial metrics.

The electric car and solar panel maker’s board certified that Musk earned the big payout, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The filing says Musk can buy 1.69 million shares of Tesla stock for $350.02 each, but it wasn’t clear whether he had exercised the stock options. His payout is based on the difference between the option price and Thursday’s closing share price of $805.81.

Musk earned the options as part of an audacious compensation package approved by the board in 2018.

According to the filing, the board certified that Tesla had reached the milestones by hitting $20 billion in total revenue for four previous quarters and a total market value of $100 billion. The company also reached $1.5 billion in adjusted pretax earnings, but that must still be certified by the board, the filing said.

Musk has to hold the stock for a minimum of five years, under the terms of the compensation package.

Musk can afford to wait before cashing in on his latest windfall, given his wealth is estimated at $39 billion by Forbes magazine.

All told, the incentives approved by Tesla’s board in 2018 consist of 20.3 million stock options that will be doled out in 12 different bundles if the company is able to reach progressively more difficult financial goals. It’s one of the biggest corporate pay packages in U.S. history.

In order for Musk to receive all 20.3 million stock options, Tesla will have to generate adjusted annual earnings of $14 billion on annual revenue of $175 billion coupled with a market value of $650 billion. In the past four quarters, Tesla, which is based in Palo Alto, California, has reported adjusted earnings totalling $3.6 billion on revenue totalling $26 billion.

Source: Tesla’s Musk earns

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SpaceX's historic astronaut launch try draws huge crowds despite NASA warnings – Space.com

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Spectators crowd the lawn at the end of Main Street in Titusville, Fla., to watch SpaceX launch Demo-2, its first astronaut launch for NASA, from the Kennedy Space Center on May 27, 2020. (Image credit: Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)
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Spectators pack the sidewalk near Space View Park in Titusville, Fla., on Wednesday, May 27, 2020.

Spectators pack the sidewalk near Space View Park in Titusville, Fla., on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. (Image credit: Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)
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One mask is visible in this photo of people gathered to watch SpaceX's launch attempt May 27, 2020.

One mask is visible in this photo of spectators gathered in in Port Canaveral, Florida to watch SpaceX’s first astronaut launch for NASA on May 27, 2020. (Image credit: Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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A hopeful, future astronaut celebrates the SpaceX launch attempt in person.

A hopeful, future astronaut celebrates SpaceX’s first astronaut launch attempt in person in a park in Titusville, Florida on May 27, 2020. (Image credit: Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

Despite warnings from NASA officials and the risks implied by the current pandemic, which has so far claimed over 100,000 lives in the U.S., approximately 150,000 people gathered on Florida’s space coast to watch SpaceX’s first attempt at launching astronauts to space yesterday (May 27).

SpaceX attempted to launch its Crew Dragon spacecraft with two veteran NASA astronauts from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center yesterday as part of the Demo-2 test flight to the International Space Station. Unfortunately, bad weather delayed the launch to no earlier than Saturday (May 30). 

Despite the risks of the coronavirus pandemic (there have been over 52,000 cases and 2,300 deaths related to the novel coronavirus in Florida so far), stormy weather and a tornado warning, approximately 150,000 people traveled to watch the event. “We are still running cell phone data and other reports for possible additional insight, but the estimated number of viewers in person was 150,000,” Florida’s Space Coast Office of Tourism told Space.com in an email. 

Full coverage: SpaceX’s historic Demo-2 astronaut launch explained

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine made a public announcement before the launch, urging people to do the exact opposite of what these visitors did: stay home. Bridenstine said that people should watch the launch virtually, as full launch coverage was available live on NASA TV and, by gathering and not social distancing, there is a risk of spreading or contracting COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

Kennedy Space Center was not even open to visitors for SpaceX’s launch attempt yesterday, but its visitor center reopened to the public today (May 28). NASA scheduled the facility’s big reopening for after the SpaceX launch. But, as photos from the event show, people still came in droves and packed into Florida’s nearby beaches and the causeway, desperate to get a peek at the launch. 

Related: Live updates about the coronavirus and COVID-19

The crowds of spectators, who filled highway lanes, creating serious traffic jams on their drives home following the launch delay, were impressive. However, if this launch didn’t take place during a pandemic, approximately 500,000 people could’ve been expected on the space coast, Dale Ketcham, the vice president of government & external relations at Space Florida, told Space.com in an email. 

Florida has recently begun to loosen its restrictions, originally imposed to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, by reopening businesses and public spaces like beaches. It is yet to be seen how many people will return to Kennedy (which will by then be open to the public) this Saturday for the next launch date. 

Email Chelsea Gohd at cgohd@space.com or follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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SpaceX crowds came in droves despite downpours, tornado warning, pandemic – MSN Canada

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BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. – The crowd launched early, even though the SpaceX Crew Dragon didn’t rise from Pad 39A as scheduled.

Space Coast locals and visitors from hundreds of miles away stayed through the drizzle and the downpours – even a tornado warning – before the eventual scrub of the first crewed launch from U.S. soil since 2011.

People hungry to watch history in the making – and perhaps eager to get out of COVID-19-forced isolation – made their way to Cocoa Beach, Space View Park in nearby Titusville, roadways, side streets and front yards across the Space Coast.






© TIM SHORTT/FLORIDA TODAY
Huge crowds of SpaceX spectators who gathered on A. Max Brewer Bridge in Titusville, Fla., hoping to see the first U.S. crewed mission in almost a decade, start the walk back to their vehicles after the launch was scrubbed.

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Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey told people this month to come watch the scheduled launch in person. The invitation ran contrary to NASA’s recommendation to watch the launch via broadcast. 

Previously: Unlike NASA, Florida sheriff encourages people to come see historic SpaceX launch in-person

Crowds, along with heavy rain, poured into coveted viewing spots across Brevard, but the mission was postponed scant minutes before the scheduled 4:33 p.m. launch.

Elon Musk: How he took SpaceX from an idea to the cusp of making history

Even after word dropped that the launch was a no-go, many made plans to return for the next attempt, set for Saturday.

“Do you guys want to get a hotel room for Saturday night?”   Jake Mills asked after hearing the scrub announcement on his phone via the SpaceX YouTube channel. The Gainesville network engineer and 10 relatives had traveled to the Cocoa Beach Pier to watch the launch.

“Bummed out. But safety first, right?” said Mills, who has friends who work for SpaceX.

“I would rather wait until Saturday for a healthy, safe launch than to bend the rules and launch unsafely,” he said.

SpaceX launching its first human crew to space: Here is everything you need to know

Not many masks were sighted among the onlookers. Crowds were far smaller than for high-profile launches of the past and between the COVID-19 crisis and bad weather, nowhere near the crowd estimates circulating for weeks. NASA had urged spectators to stay away and watch the launch online or on TV because of the pandemic.



a car parked in a parking lot: Matt Ward and Emma O'Halloran from Orlando parked next to the Beachline around 7:30. People started showing up at dawn to view the launch of the SpaceX Crew Dragon to the International Space Station.


© MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
Matt Ward and Emma O’Halloran from Orlando parked next to the Beachline around 7:30. People started showing up at dawn to view the launch of the SpaceX Crew Dragon to the International Space Station.

Still, by early afternoon, traffic was blocked on the A. Max Brewer Bridge in Titusville. The bridge grew more crowded prelaunch time and became a sea of thousands of pedestrians headed west after the scrub. The Beachline causeway over the Banana River heading east or west was like a wet parking lot by late afternoon.

At Cocoa Beach Pier, which was no more packed than on a sunny, pre-pandemic weekend, the few hundred who braved nasty storms were primed for the event.

Before 10 a.m., surfers were catching waves, and TV crews had positioned their equipment at Rikki Tiki Tavern at the end of the pier, cameras pointed north toward the launch site. 

The pier opened at 11 a.m., and a handful of lunchtime patrons filtered in. The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic was evident: Officials shut down the pier from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. to clean and sanitize the area.

‘We didn’t want to miss it’

About 90 minutes before the scheduled launch time, Gulf Coast resident Olga Cole and her family took refuge beneath the Cocoa Beach Pier during a downpour.

She was born and raised in Moldova, an Eastern European nation that declared independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. She was raised to revere cosmonauts – but wore a white NASA shirt to witness the historic American launch.

“Because of the past of my country, the USSR, we prize the cosmonauts. But it is a big deal,” the 24-year-old said, holding her 7-month-old daughter, Katherine. “Space is common for everyone.”

Olga and her husband, John,  23, a self-described Elon Musk fan, arrived Tuesday night from St. Petersburg.

Bill and Robbin Dick of The Villages in central Florida paid $40 for two spaces to park their 35-foot Winnebago Sunstar motor home at the pier. By 9 a.m., the couple had extended the vehicle’s awning and set up folding chairs, prepped to watch NASA’s launch coverage on TV.

“It’s a historic launch. We’re retired. And these are things we want to do. We didn’t want to miss it,” said Bill Dick, a retired New York City firefighter.



a man standing next to a tree: Russell and Gladia LaFontaine from Deltona set up a little canopy and fishing until launch, parked next to the Beachline. People started showing up at dawn to view the launch of the SpaceX Crew Dragon to the International Space Station.


© MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
Russell and Gladia LaFontaine from Deltona set up a little canopy and fishing until launch, parked next to the Beachline. People started showing up at dawn to view the launch of the SpaceX Crew Dragon to the International Space Station.

At Port Canaveral, diners began trickling into Rusty’s Seafood and Oyster Bar just before noon. At 50% capacity, the restaurant holds about 150 people.

“We’re bringing in business, definitely, but it’s not what we’d like to bring in.” said Rusty Fisher, owner. “Just managing people, that’s the big thing, making sure they behave themselves.”

Follow reporter Britt Kennerly on Twitter: @bybrittkennerly 

Contributing: Rick Neale, Eric Rogers, Suzy Leonard, Tim Walters, John Torres, Tim Shortt, Craig Bailey, Malcolm Denemark and Jay Cannon of the USA TODAY Network.

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This article originally appeared on Florida Today: SpaceX crowds came in droves despite downpours, tornado warning, pandemic

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