Connect with us

News

Russia resuming bomber, submarine patrols near North America after pause: Norad

Published

 on

OTTAWA — Russia has started sending long-range bombers back over the Arctic toward North American airspace following a short-lived pause during the early months of its war in Ukraine, according to a senior Canadian military official.

Russian submarines are also operating off both coasts as Moscow seeks to demonstrate its ability to strike Canada and the United States, said Lt.-Gen. Alain Pelletier, the deputy commander of the North American Aerospace Defence Command.

“We have seen a reduction this year, especially since the Feb. 24 illegal invasion of Ukraine by Russia. However, some of those activities have now resumed,” Pelletier told the Senate defence committee on Monday.

“The activities are not only limited to the long-range aviation. Russia uses its submarines now both on the Atlantic coast and the Pacific coast to actually demonstrate its strategic capabilities and to present a threat to North America.”

While Pelletier did not give more specific details, Norad officials announced last month that two long-range Russian bombers were intercepted by American fighter jets after approaching Alaska. The bombers did not enter North American airspace before leaving.

Pelletier and other defence officials also confirmed that Canada and the U.S. have started to work on modernizing Norad, the shared early-warning system that comprises North America’s first line of defence against a foreign attack by air.

The Liberal government announced in June that Ottawa plans to invest $4.9 billion over six years and $40 billion over the next 20 years to upgrade the system in co-operation with Washington, D.C.

That includes replacing the string of 1980s-era radars in Canada’s north that form the backbone of this country’s contribution to Norad with more modern systems that can see farther and detect and track new types of weapons.

“We’re at the very early stages,” Defence Department official Jonathan Quinn said. “The announcement was in June, but we are setting up detailed plans with milestones, setting up project offices here at National Defence headquarters to advance the specific initiatives.”

This comes as Russia and China, in particular, have started flexing their muscles in the Arctic and developing new weapons that can more easily strike North America, including cruise missiles and hypersonic weapons that fly extremely fast.

Yet while research and development on new radars and other equipment to find and stop such weapons is advancing quickly, Quinn told the committee that it will be some time before they are in the field.

Canada and the U.S. will be forced to rely on the threat of retaliation to prevent such attacks until then, Quinn added.

“During the gap period, we would be relying probably a little bit more heavily than we would like on the deterrence by punishment until we kind of reinforce those North American defences to bolster the defence deterrence by denial,” he said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 21, 2022.

 

Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

News

15-year-old ATV driver dies in collision on New Brunswick highway

Published

 on

A 15-year-old driver of an all-terrain vehicle has died after a collision on a Moncton, N.B., highway.

The RCMP say they responded to a report of a crash between a parked vehicle and an ATV on Highway 2 on Thursday afternoon.

Police say they believe the 15-year-old boy was driving on the shoulder of the highway when he collided with the parked vehicle.

The teenager, who was the sole occupant of the ATV, was taken to hospital with life-threatening injuries and died the following day.

Police say the three people in the other vehicle were not injured.

RCMP did not release details of the speed the boy was driving at the time of the crash.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 19, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Woman found dead in suitcase in Newfoundland; spouse found dead, suspected in killing

Published

 on

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. – Police in St. John’s, N.L., say a woman’s body was found in a suitcase in the city’s downtown this week and her spouse — who was found dead a day prior — is suspected of killing her.

Royal Newfoundland Constabulary Const. James Cadigan says the 33-year-old Iranian woman’s body was discovered Tuesday night in a suitcase in a vacant lot. He says it had been placed in the area six days before.

Cadigan says her 34-year-old Iranian husband was found dead in his home on Monday.

He says police have not determined whether their deaths involve a murder-suicide, and he says the two “had no involvement” with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary prior to the discovery of their bodies.

Cadigan says the woman arrived in Newfoundland on May 15 and the man had been living in downtown St. John’s for several years.

Police are not releasing their names to protect their family’s privacy, and are looking for any information from the public about what happened.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 19, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Pilot dead after ultralight plane crash northwest of Fredericton

Published

 on

 

FREDERICTON – The pilot of an ultralight plane died after the aircraft crashed in a cornfield about 25 kilometres northwest of Fredericton.

Ken Hodgson, fire chief of Keswick Valley Fire Department, says his team received a call at 11:33 a.m. about a crash in Burtts Corner, N.B., along Route 104, which links the province to Nova Scotia.

Hodgson says there were no other casualties.

Ambulance New Brunswick, the coroner’s office and RCMP also responded to the crash.

In a news release, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada says it deployed a team of investigators to an “aircraft accident near Fredericton.”

But the agency did not immediately respond to questions asking for details about the crash.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 19, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending