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Samsung Galaxy M02s is official with big battery and aggressive price – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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Samsung introduced a new affordable smartphone called Galaxy M02s. It will debut in India with a starting price of INR8,999 ($122) and will come with an octa-core CPU, a big battery, and three cameras on its back.

The Galaxy M02s is powered by the Snapdragon 450 chipset. The 3.5-year-old platform is built on the 14nm process and offers an octa-core Cortex-A55 CPU running at 1.8GHz. It is coupled with either 3GB RAM and 32GB storage in the base version or 4/64 GB in the more upscale model. There is a microSD slot for up to 1 TB more of storage.

The front panel of the phone is a 6.5” HD+ LCD with an Infinity-V notch for the 5 MP f/2.2 selfie shooter. The triple camera combo on the back brings a 13MP main unit and a couple of 2MP sensors for macro and depth.

Samsung Galaxy M02s is official with a cheap price and big battery

While those numbers aren’t particularly inspiring, the battery capacity is something to be jolly about – the 5,000mAh unit supports 15W fast charging through a USB-C port.

Samsung is selling the Galaxy M02s with a dual-SIM slot with dual 4G VoLTE support, Bluetooth 5.0, and Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n. There’s also a 3.5 mm audio jack and an FM radio. The interface is Samsung One, based on Android 10.

The phone will be sold at Amazon India and Samsung’s own website in three colors – Red, Blue, Black. The launch date will be announced soon.

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Preview: 2022 BMW M5 CS arrives with 627 horsepower and 230 pounds of weight savings – Motor Authority

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BMW on Tuesday unveiled a new range-topping version of its M5 super sedan.

Offered for the 2022 model year only, the new variant, dubbed the M5 CS, reaches dealerships in the second half of 2021 with a starting price of $142,995, including destination. Its arrival places the M5 alongside other M cars that have received the CS treatment. BMW also offers an M2 CS, and there were CS versions of the previous-generation M3 and M4.

The M5 CS is basically the M5 you’d get if engineers from the BMW M division were given free rein to craft the car. It should come as no surprise then that the M5 CS is the quickest and most powerful production BMW to date.

Under the hood is the familiar S63 4.4-liter twin-turbocharged V-8, tuned here to deliver 627 horsepower. In comparison, the regular M5 makes 600 hp and the M5 Competition makes 617 hp. All three versions make the same 553 pound-feet of torque.

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

But the M5 CS has also benefitted from 230 pounds of weight savings compared to the standard M5. The result is a curb weight of 4,114 pounds. Weight savings have come from lightweight carbon-fiber bucket seats borrowed from the latest M3 and M4 up front, and two individual seats in the rear instead of the standard bench. The car also features carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic for the roof, hood, rear spoiler, front splitter, rear diffuser and side mirror caps.

Carbon-ceramic brakes are also fitted as standard and alone help save 51 pounds. The brakes feature calipers painted red (as opposed to the traditional blue used on M cars) and sit within 20-inch forged aluminum wheels with an exclusive bronze finish that is found on other areas of the car, like on the grille. Another exclusive touch are motorsport-inspired yellow headlights, albeit only for the daytime running lights.

According to BMW, the M5 CS will rocket to 60 mph from rest in 2.9 seconds and top out at 190 mph.

Retained is the M5’s 8-speed automatic and rear-biased all-wheel-drive system known as M xDrive. At the push of the button, the driver can choose drive to go to the rear wheels only.

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

The suspension has also been further developed compared to the M5 and M5 Competition. There are 10% stiffer springs, 0.2-inch lower ride height, increased front negative camber, a firmer rear anti-roll bar and tow-link ball-joint mounts, and retuning of the adaptive dampers to accommodate the lower weight. There are also stiffer engine mounts, and track-ready Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires can be added as a no-cost option.

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

2022 BMW M5 CS

A new Setup function allows the driver to configure their ideal vehicle setup for the powertrain, drivetrain and chassis via the infotainment screen. The driver can save two different profiles and access them quickly using the red M1 and M2 buttons on the steering wheel. There are also pre-configured Road, Sport and Track settings to choose from.

Buyers will be glad to note that the car comes fully loaded with all of the M5’s top-shelf options. The really is very little to add. Basically there’s only the color to choose. The standard color is a gray metallic known as Brands Hatch, but buyers can choose from two available colors: Frozen Brands Hatch and Frozen Deep Green metallic.

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Five big lessons experts say Canada should learn from COVID-19: – Abbotsford News

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In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, The Canadian Press interviewed a group of leading Canadian experts in disease control and epidemiology and asked them what should be done to reduce the harms the next time a germ with similar destructive potential emerges. Here are the five most important lessons they offered:

1. Socio-economic and health inequities have made some people more vulnerable

COVID-19 has exposed fault lines in the Canadian society by showing how long-standing inequities contributed to higher rates of infections and mortality, said Steffanie Strathdee, a Toronto-born epidemiologist at the University of California in San Diego.

“The people who are, by and large, getting COVID are people who are poor, or of-colour, or living in poor socio-economic conditions,” Strathdee said.

In an analysis of COVID-19 deaths between March and July, Statistics Canada found that death rates because of the virus were double in Canadian neighbourhoods where more than 25 per cent of the people are members of visible minorities compared to neighbourhoods where minorities are less than one per cent of the people.

Strathdee said people in many areas in Canada have limited health services.

“In my sister and mother’s region of Stouffville (a suburb of Toronto), it’s very, very difficult to get a doctor,” she said.

“What we need to do is invest in our public health and health care infrastructure, because this isn’t going to be the last pandemic we see.”

University of British Columbia professor Erica Frank, a doctor and population-health expert, said almost all those who have died because of COVID-19 had pre-existing risk factors, including age.

“Not paying enough attention to reduction of chronic-disease risk has greatly increased the cohort of susceptible people to COVID,” she said.

She said there is a need to spend money on public health systems and on social determinants of health, such as housing, to decrease sickness and death.

2. Canada’s division of health-care responsibilities is inefficient

The disconnect between federal and provincial or territorial actions to fight the pandemic is getting in the way of an effective response, said Donald Sheppard. He’s the chair of the department of microbiology and immunology in the faculty of medicine at McGill University and a member of Canada’s COVID-19 therapeutics task force.

For instance, Sheppard said, after Eli Lilly’s COVID-19 antibody treatment was approved by Health Canada, bought by the federal government and greenlit by the federal therapeutics task force, British Columbia health authorities decided to reject the federal approval of the medication.

He said there many more examples, including the handling of long-term care homes.

“Quebec is screaming they want money but they’re refusing to sign on to the minimum standards of long-term care,” he said.

He said there have been poor communication and a lot of territorialism since the beginning of the pandemic.

“There should be a time when it’s all hands on deck and we don’t play games,” he said. “That didn’t happen. We saw these fragmentations between the provinces and the feds leading to, frankly, people dying.”

3. Centralized decision-making in health care stifles innovation

Sheppard said the Canadian health care system can’t be nimble because federal and provincial governments have seized control of decisions on how to handle the pandemic.

“During a new disease like a pandemic, when we’re learning about things, the people on the ground actually are learning a lot faster than the people sitting in Ottawa, Quebec City or Toronto,” he said.

He said Canadian businesses and universities have been struggling to get approval for testing strategies that use rapid tests to reopen safely.

“The way that the ministries of health are set up, they actually make it incredibly difficult to set those type of things up, because they hold on to all the power with a stranglehold.”

Sheppard said there’s no process private entities can use to launch innovative testing programs.

“The dogma from the ministries of health are simple: What we’re doing is right. There is no other better way to do anything … therefore we will not help anybody do anything different than what we’re doing. And anything other than that is a threat to our authority,” he said. “That’s the mentality, and it’s just killed innovation in the health-care setting.”

4. Lack of coordination stymied research

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how crucial research is to inform health decisions, said Francois Lamontagne, a clinician-scientist at the University of Sherbrooke.

He said Canadian scientists have played prominent roles scientifically during the pandemic but recruiting patients to participate in clinical trials has been a challenge due to lack of coordination.

“There have been a lot of studies launched. A lot of those studies overlapped,” he said.

He said having too many studies at the same time has resulted in shortages of suitable patients who are willing to be subjects in clinical trials.

“This, essentially, dilutes all of the studies and you end up enrolling very few people in too many studies.”

Lamontagne said the United Kingdom has been the locomotive of the world in enrolling patients in clinical trials because research is an integral part of the country’s national health system.

“It’s not something that happens in a silo. It’s part of the (National Health Service),” he said. “This led them to build the infrastructure … And then there’s an effort to co-ordinate and prioritize studies so they do one study and they do it well and they get the answers very quickly.”

He said creating better research infrastructure and coordination should be a priority for Canada.

“This is a criticism directed at me as well. I am part of ‘us’ — researchers. We have to get our act together and there has to be an effort of coordination.”

Lamontagne said health research in Canada is largely funded by the federal government whereas health care is a provincial jurisdiction and both levels need to co-operate.

“The stakes are so important for not only how we respond to pandemics now and in the future, but also for the sustainability of a public health-care system,” he said.

5. Good messaging and communication matter

Strathdee said good science communication with the public is important to address misinformation regarding the novel coronaviruses and its vaccines.

“We need for people to understand that science and medicine don’t have all the answers all the time, that we’re learning just like everybody else,” she said.

Strathdee said guidelines will be updated as more data become available and that’s what happened when more data showed that face masks reduced the risk of COVID-19 transmission.

She said government officials should be trained in health literacy.

John Brownstein, a Montreal-born Harvard University epidemiologist, said minority communities, including Indigenous communities, tend to have more mistrust in vaccines and for good historical reasons.

“We got to figure out how to improve communication and improve confidence,” he said.

Strathdee said it’s critical for politicians and public health officials to be honest with the public by “making people aware that, you know, it could get worse before it gets better, and that they need to stay the course.”

She also said people need to understand that if segments of the population are left behind in vaccination, like prisoners and homeless people, that will put everyone at risk.

She said Canada did a good job in detecting COVID-19 cases because it was hit hard by SARS.

“We have to make sure that we don’t unlearn those lessons going forward and that we build upon what we’ve learned from COVID and prepare for the next pandemic.”

Coronavirus

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Five big lessons experts say Canada should learn from COVID-19: – Coast Mountain News

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In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, The Canadian Press interviewed a group of leading Canadian experts in disease control and epidemiology and asked them what should be done to reduce the harms the next time a germ with similar destructive potential emerges. Here are the five most important lessons they offered:

1. Socio-economic and health inequities have made some people more vulnerable

COVID-19 has exposed fault lines in the Canadian society by showing how long-standing inequities contributed to higher rates of infections and mortality, said Steffanie Strathdee, a Toronto-born epidemiologist at the University of California in San Diego.

“The people who are, by and large, getting COVID are people who are poor, or of-colour, or living in poor socio-economic conditions,” Strathdee said.

In an analysis of COVID-19 deaths between March and July, Statistics Canada found that death rates because of the virus were double in Canadian neighbourhoods where more than 25 per cent of the people are members of visible minorities compared to neighbourhoods where minorities are less than one per cent of the people.

Strathdee said people in many areas in Canada have limited health services.

“In my sister and mother’s region of Stouffville (a suburb of Toronto), it’s very, very difficult to get a doctor,” she said.

“What we need to do is invest in our public health and health care infrastructure, because this isn’t going to be the last pandemic we see.”

University of British Columbia professor Erica Frank, a doctor and population-health expert, said almost all those who have died because of COVID-19 had pre-existing risk factors, including age.

“Not paying enough attention to reduction of chronic-disease risk has greatly increased the cohort of susceptible people to COVID,” she said.

She said there is a need to spend money on public health systems and on social determinants of health, such as housing, to decrease sickness and death.

2. Canada’s division of health-care responsibilities is inefficient

The disconnect between federal and provincial or territorial actions to fight the pandemic is getting in the way of an effective response, said Donald Sheppard. He’s the chair of the department of microbiology and immunology in the faculty of medicine at McGill University and a member of Canada’s COVID-19 therapeutics task force.

For instance, Sheppard said, after Eli Lilly’s COVID-19 antibody treatment was approved by Health Canada, bought by the federal government and greenlit by the federal therapeutics task force, British Columbia health authorities decided to reject the federal approval of the medication.

He said there many more examples, including the handling of long-term care homes.

“Quebec is screaming they want money but they’re refusing to sign on to the minimum standards of long-term care,” he said.

He said there have been poor communication and a lot of territorialism since the beginning of the pandemic.

“There should be a time when it’s all hands on deck and we don’t play games,” he said. “That didn’t happen. We saw these fragmentations between the provinces and the feds leading to, frankly, people dying.”

3. Centralized decision-making in health care stifles innovation

Sheppard said the Canadian health care system can’t be nimble because federal and provincial governments have seized control of decisions on how to handle the pandemic.

“During a new disease like a pandemic, when we’re learning about things, the people on the ground actually are learning a lot faster than the people sitting in Ottawa, Quebec City or Toronto,” he said.

He said Canadian businesses and universities have been struggling to get approval for testing strategies that use rapid tests to reopen safely.

“The way that the ministries of health are set up, they actually make it incredibly difficult to set those type of things up, because they hold on to all the power with a stranglehold.”

Sheppard said there’s no process private entities can use to launch innovative testing programs.

“The dogma from the ministries of health are simple: What we’re doing is right. There is no other better way to do anything … therefore we will not help anybody do anything different than what we’re doing. And anything other than that is a threat to our authority,” he said. “That’s the mentality, and it’s just killed innovation in the health-care setting.”

4. Lack of coordination stymied research

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how crucial research is to inform health decisions, said Francois Lamontagne, a clinician-scientist at the University of Sherbrooke.

He said Canadian scientists have played prominent roles scientifically during the pandemic but recruiting patients to participate in clinical trials has been a challenge due to lack of coordination.

“There have been a lot of studies launched. A lot of those studies overlapped,” he said.

He said having too many studies at the same time has resulted in shortages of suitable patients who are willing to be subjects in clinical trials.

“This, essentially, dilutes all of the studies and you end up enrolling very few people in too many studies.”

Lamontagne said the United Kingdom has been the locomotive of the world in enrolling patients in clinical trials because research is an integral part of the country’s national health system.

“It’s not something that happens in a silo. It’s part of the (National Health Service),” he said. “This led them to build the infrastructure … And then there’s an effort to co-ordinate and prioritize studies so they do one study and they do it well and they get the answers very quickly.”

He said creating better research infrastructure and coordination should be a priority for Canada.

“This is a criticism directed at me as well. I am part of ‘us’ — researchers. We have to get our act together and there has to be an effort of coordination.”

Lamontagne said health research in Canada is largely funded by the federal government whereas health care is a provincial jurisdiction and both levels need to co-operate.

“The stakes are so important for not only how we respond to pandemics now and in the future, but also for the sustainability of a public health-care system,” he said.

5. Good messaging and communication matter

Strathdee said good science communication with the public is important to address misinformation regarding the novel coronaviruses and its vaccines.

“We need for people to understand that science and medicine don’t have all the answers all the time, that we’re learning just like everybody else,” she said.

Strathdee said guidelines will be updated as more data become available and that’s what happened when more data showed that face masks reduced the risk of COVID-19 transmission.

She said government officials should be trained in health literacy.

John Brownstein, a Montreal-born Harvard University epidemiologist, said minority communities, including Indigenous communities, tend to have more mistrust in vaccines and for good historical reasons.

“We got to figure out how to improve communication and improve confidence,” he said.

Strathdee said it’s critical for politicians and public health officials to be honest with the public by “making people aware that, you know, it could get worse before it gets better, and that they need to stay the course.”

She also said people need to understand that if segments of the population are left behind in vaccination, like prisoners and homeless people, that will put everyone at risk.

She said Canada did a good job in detecting COVID-19 cases because it was hit hard by SARS.

“We have to make sure that we don’t unlearn those lessons going forward and that we build upon what we’ve learned from COVID and prepare for the next pandemic.”

Coronavirus

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