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Snapdragon vs Exynos: does Note 20 Ultra with 865 Plus outperform? – PhoneArena

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That’s great if you live in the US or South Korea, where the Snapdragon 865 Plus models will be sold, as only Qualcomm’s attached modem can and is certified to connect to the latest 5G network generations in these countries.
If you are perusing the global Galaxy Note 20 Ultra version, however, it will be powered by Samsung’s Exynos 990 chipset, the same one that is in the respective Galaxy S20 Ultra models. 

Given that there was a gap in performance and thermal throttling between the Snapdragon and Exynos versions of the S20 Ultra, we expect it to grow even larger between the 865+ and Exynos 990 models of the Note 20 Ultra, so we ran some benchmarks.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 Plus vs Exynos 990 Note 20 Ultra performance benchmarks

As usual, the Exynos version of the Note 20 Ultra gives way to the Snapdragon model, but that’s valid for the S20 variants as well. 

The phones are still plenty powerful enough to run everything you throw at them, 12GB RAM and all, yet the 865+ vs 865 advantage is not only in peak speed but also at extra image processing and newer memory or connectivity standards support.

Snapdragon 865 vs 865 Plus vs Exynos 990 specs

 

As you can see, there are three main areas where the Snapdragon 865+ outshines the 865 – peak processing and graphics speed (the first mobile chip to break the 3GHz barrier), even more global 5G multiband connectivity, and the newest Bluetooth 5.2 and Wi-fi 6E standards support.

What is Bluetooth 5.2 and Wi-fi 6E?

The Wi-Fi 6E in Snapdragon 865+ means that the Note 20 Ultra is capable of operating on the 6 GHz band. It would work like the current WiFi 6 on 5 GHz but with way more channels that won’t interfere or overlap. According to the Wi-Fi Alliance, Wi-Fi 6E can have “14 additional 80 MHz channels and 7 additional 160 MHz channels,”reducing congestion and interference.

New Bluetooth 5.2 vs Bluetooth 5.1 features:
  • Higher quality, lower-power audio codec.
  • Independent true wireless earbuds synchronicity, and broadcasting audio streams to multiple listeners in different languages.
  • Multiple apps can interact with a Bluetooth Low Energy device simultaneously, reducing latency and interference.

Moreover, there is the thermal throttling to consider, and, looking at our Note 20 Ultra battery tests, the Exynos version still has a way to go in order to catch up to the Snapdragon models in the US when it comes to endurance. No more than seven hours of YouTube playback with a 4500mAh battery and a top-shelf OLED display, is, after all, nothing to brag home about in this day and age.
So, yes, both Snapdragon vs Exynos Note 20 Ultra synthetic benchmarks, and real-life scenario battery tests return an advantage for the Snapdragon 865+ models over the global Exynos 990 variant. Not that this comes as a huge surprise, yet we sincerely hope that Samsung will be done with that split processing practice for the Galaxy S21 next year.

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AI Weekly: Amazon went wide with Alexa; now it’s going deep – VentureBeat

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Amazon’s naked ambition to become part of everyone’s daily lives was on full display this week at its annual hardware event. It announced a slew of new Alexa-powered devices, including a home surveillance drone, a suite of Ring-branded car alarm systems, and miscellany like an adorable little kids’ Echo device. But it’s clear Amazon’s strategy has shifted, even if only for a product cycle, from going wide to going deep.

Last year, Amazon baked its virtual assistant into any household device that could accommodate a chip. Its list of new widgets with Alexa seemed a mile long and included a menagerie of home goods, like lamps and microwaves. The company also announced device partnerships that ensure Alexa would live on some devices alongside other virtual assistants, tools to make it easier for developers to create Alexa skills, networking devices and capabilities, and wearables. It was a volume play and an aggressive bid to build out its ecosystem in even more markets.

This year, Amazon had fewer devices to announce, but it played up ways it has made Alexa itself better than ever. That’s the second prong of the strategy here: Get Alexa everywhere, then improve the marquee features such that the experience for users eclipses anything the competition offers.

As is always the case at these sorts of events, Amazon talked big and dreamy about all the new Alexa features. Users will find out for themselves whether this is the real deal or just hype when Amazon rolls out updates over the course of the next year (they’re landing on smart home devices first). But on paper and in the staged demos, Alexa’s new capabilities certainly seem to bring it a step closer to the holy grail of speaking to a virtual assistant just like talking to a person.

That’s the crux of what Amazon says it has done to improve Alexa, imbuing it with AI to make it more humanlike. This includes picking up nuances in speech and adjusting its own cadence, asking its human conversation partner for clarifications to fill in knowledge, and using feedback like “Alexa, that’s wrong” to learn and correct itself.

Amazon is particularly proud of the new natural turn-taking capabilities, which help Alexa understand the vagaries of human conversation. For example, in a staged demo two friends talked about ordering a pizza through an Alexa device. Like normal humans, they didn’t use each other’s names in the conversation, they paused to think, they changed their minds and adjusted the order, and so on. Alexa “knew” when to chime in, as well as when they were talking to each other and not to the Alexa device.

At the event, Alexa VP and head scientist Rohit Prasad said this required “real invention” and that the team went beyond just natural language processing (NLP) to embrace multisensory AI — acoustic, linguistic, and visual cues. And he said those all happen locally, on the device itself.

This is thanks to Amazon’s new AZ1 Neural Edge processor, which is designed to accelerate machine learning applications on-device instead of in the cloud. In the event liveblog, Amazon said: “With AZ1, powerful inference engines can run quickly on the edge — starting with an all-neural speech recognition model that will process speech faster, making Alexa even more responsive.” There are scant details available about the chip, but it likely portends a near future when Alexa devices are able to do more meaningful virtual assisting without an internet connection.

Given the utter lack of information about the AZ1, it’s impossible to say what it can or can’t do. But it would a potential game changer if it was able to handle all of Alexa’s new tricks on devices as simple as an Echo smart speaker. There could be positive privacy implications, too, if users were able to enjoy a newly powerful Alexa on-device, keeping their voice recordings from Amazon’s cloud.

But for Amazon, going deep isn’t just about a more humanlike Alexa; it involves pulling people further into its ecosystem, which Amazon hopes is the sum of adding device and service ubiquity to more engaging user experiences.

Part of that effort centers on Ring devices, which now include not just front-door home security products but also car security products and a small autonomous drone for the inside of your home. They’re essentially surveillance devices — and taken together, they form an ecosystem of surveillance devices and services that Amazon owns, and that connects to law enforcement. You can buy into it as deeply as you want, creating a surveillance bubble inside your home, around your home, and on board your vehicles, regardless of where you’ve parked them. The tension over Ring devices — what and who they record, where those recordings go, and who uses them for what purpose — will only be amplified by this in-home drone and the car alarm and camera.

Whether Amazon goes deep or wide, what hasn’t changed is that it wants to be omnipresent in our lives. And with every event’s worth of new devices and capabilities, the company takes another step closer to that goal.

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Epic Games and Spotify are founder-members of a new 'anti-app-tax' organization – Notebookcheck.net

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Please share our article, every link counts!

Deirdre O’Donnell, 2020-09-25 (Update: 2020-09-25)

I became a professional writer and editor shortly after graduation. My degrees are in biomedical sciences; however, they led to some experience in the biotech area, which convinced me of its potential to revolutionize our health, environment and lives in general.
This developed into an all-consuming interest in more aspects of tech over time: I can never write enough on the latest electronics, gadgets and innovations. My other interests include imaging, astronomy, and streaming all the things. Oh, and coffee.

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Amazon's new Ring security camera will fly around your home – BNN

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Amazon.com Inc. has built a camera on a small drone designed to fly around the house and investigate suspicious activity.

The Ring Always Home Cam moves autonomously and is equipped with an indoor camera, giving users multiple view points of their homes. The drone can take a path around the home that’s pre-determined by the user and only records when in flight, not when docked, the company said.

The device will be available in 2021 for US$250, the company said during a live-stream event on Thursday.

Ring, based in southern California, makes internet-connected doorbells and home cameras. Since Amazon’s acquisition of the startup in early 2018, it has seen sales surge. Ring has also been beset by privacy concerns, from hacks of its products due to weak passwords, to reports of employees sharing unencrypted user videos.

On Thursday, Ring said it would enable end-to-end encryption for user videos.

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