Connect with us

Health

Sobering COVID-19 milestones reached by hardest hit Canadian provinces – National Observer

Published

 on


The Canadian provinces hardest hit by the global COVID-19 pandemic released sobering numbers on Sunday, with Quebec’s overall case count passing the 100,000 mark and Ontario registering more than 1,000 single-day cases for the first time since the start of the worldwide outbreak.

Despite registering comparable daily tallies, the two provinces long at the epicentre of Canada’s COVID-19 outbreak appeared to be on opposite trajectories.

Public health experts noted that Quebec’s long-standing high case counts appeared to be levelling off, while stressing the week ahead will be crucial to bring Ontario’s surging numbers back under control.

Quebec health officials reported 879 new cases, bringing the province’s total to 100,114 infections. The province also recorded 11 additional deaths attributed to the virus, for a total of 6,143.

“Comparing the past two weeks, we see that the number of cases is stable, but remains high,” Quebec Health Minister Christian Dube said on Twitter, urging people to make an effort to reduce transmission of the virus.

The province’s recent COVID-19 numbers are more encouraging than they were last month, however, said Helene Carabin, a professor at Universite de Montreal.

Carabin said Quebec’s COVID-19 reproduction number, which measures the virus’ ability to spread, is slowly creeping lower — a positive sign that indicates people are following public health guidelines.

“The population has clearly understood that in order to limit transmission, we have to be more careful,” she said in an interview.

“We’re going in the right direction, unlike what was the case in September. Now what it tells us is that probably we will continue to have to keep being very careful during the winter months for it not to creep up.”

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s top public health officer, said in a statement Sunday that a “resurgence” of COVID-19 continues across the country.

Tam said there is a concern that Canada has not yet seen the full impact of the recent increase in COVID-19 cases, as hospitalizations and deaths generally lag behind case numbers.

Quebec’s COVID-19 cases leveling off but this week will be crucial to bring Ontario’s surging numbers back under control. #COVID-19 #Ontario #Quebec

Canada had 215,879 total cases of COVID-19 as of Sunday, including 9,940 deaths.

Manitoba announced 161 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday and the deaths of four people — two of which were related to an outbreak at a Winnipeg long-term care home where 17 people have now died.

Saskatchewan reported 60 new cases, down from its record-high of 78 that was set on Saturday, and no new deaths have been reported since Oct. 11.

Public health officials in Newfoundland and Labrador reported one new case of COVID-19, while officials in New Brunswick reported two new infections and two additional deaths.

In Ontario, which recorded more than 1,000 new cases in a 24-hour period on Sunday for the first time since the pandemic took hold, at least one medical expert voiced concerns about the overall trend of the provincial figures.

The province reported 1,042 new COVID-19 cases, breaking the previous day’s single-day peak of 978 new infections. It also reported seven new deaths related to the novel coronavirus.

“Obviously no one wants to see 1,000 new cases per day,” said Dr. Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease specialist and researcher at Toronto General Hospital.

Bogoch said that while the cause of the recent spike is not entirely clear, the week ahead will offer a critical window for assessing the province’s progress in combatting the pandemic.

“Are we going to start to see a plateau in these numbers, reflective of a successful policy implementation in the hotspots in Ontario,” Bogoch asked, referring to major metropolitan regions where the bulk of the province’s latest cases have been concentrated.

“Or will we see a continuing growth in the number of new cases per day?”

Both Ontario and Quebec have reimposed restrictions over the past several weeks to try to contain the spread of the virus during the second wave of the pandemic.

Several regions of Quebec, including Montreal and Quebec City, were placed under the highest COVID-19 alert level, which forced the closure of bars and other public venues.

Quebecers in high-risk areas have also been told to avoid seeing anyone who does not live in their household.

In Ontario, Premier Doug Ford has promised to provide an update on Monday on whether the Halton and Durham regions would join Toronto, Peel, Ottawa and York in “modified Stage 2” of the province’s economic reopening plan.

Indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people in Stage 2 regions, and gyms, casinos, cinemas and other venues in those areas must also be closed.

Public health officials across Canada have urged people to be extra vigilant during the second wave of the pandemic, as colder weather pushes people indoors.

In her statement, Tam said influenza and other respiratory infections place an added strain on hospitals in the fall and winter months, making it even more important to heed preventative measures.

“Right now, doing the best thing to keep our family, friends and community safer means keeping safely apart,” she said.

On Sunday, 278 people were hospitalized in Ontario due to the virus, including 79 in intensive care. In Quebec, 551 hospitalizations were recorded, of which 97 were in intensive care.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 25, 2020.

–with files from Holly McKenzie-Sutter in Toronto, Rob Drinkwater in Edmonton and Michael MacDonald in Halifax.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Revelstoke feeling impact of COVID-19 cluster – radionl.com

Published

 on


Local leaders in Revelstoke say there’s no signs yet that the resort municipality is turning a corner, as it deals with a growing cluster of COVID-19 cases.

As of Tuesday, there were 46 cases connected to the cluster and 32 active cases, which has now spread to a local elementary school.

City councillor Cody Younker says there’s concern that the number of cases is probably going to grow before the situation improves.

“My fear, and I think most of the community’s fear, especially our mayor by the statement he put out this morning, is that it sounds like this is still pre-emptive and it’s probably going to get a lot worse. We base that just off of what we’re hearing from more restaurants closing down, confirming they’ve now had exposures. More businesses, now a school exposure.”

Revelstoke Mountain Resort also opened last weekend, and Younker says he’s waiting to see if that has any impact on the virus spreading.

“The ski hill, I mean, I have to commend them. From what I saw in the pictures of what they put up, they did a really good job of ensuring social distancing in the lines. Compared to years previous when you’re just basically packed in like sardines. But still obviously really concerned about that,” Younker says.

“Thousands of people using the ski hill, many still riding up in the gondola together. Congregating in the parking lots, that kind of thing. I saw a large group walking downtown Friday and Saturday night. Just by my house even, in the downtown core, there were large groups walking down the streets. Not sure where they were going but concerning, of course, to see that.”

Now a week after the cluster was first reported, Younker says the reality has set in for residents about the cluster, saying many residents have actually done “an amazing job” to follow public health orders and to avoid non-essential travel out of their homes.

But he points out it feels a bit like a “ghost town.”

“There’s no nightlife, obviously most of the restaurants have moved to take out. A few more have just confirmed exposures in the last few days so now they’ve shut down. So in that sense it’s actually gotten better, in the sense that there’s less people congregating downtown. But worse, in fear of obviously what it’s going to do to the economy and local businesses.”

Yesterday, Revelstoke mayor Gary Sulz warned people to avoid travelling to the community while the cluster of cases remains, saying cases are likely still going to go up and he doesn’t want the virus spread to other communities or places like care homes.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

WHO updates mask advice, recommending they be worn in indoor, poorly ventilated areas – CBC.ca

Published

 on


The World Health Organization on Wednesday tightened guidelines on wearing face masks, recommending that, where COVID-19 is spreading, they be worn by everyone in health-care facilities and for all interactions in poorly ventilated indoor spaces.

In June, the WHO urged governments to ask everyone to wear fabric masks in indoor and outdoor public areas where there was a risk of transmission of the virus.

Since then, a second global wave of the epidemic has gathered pace. In all, more than 63 million people globally have caught COVID-19 and 1.475 million have died of it, according to a Reuters tally.

In more detailed advice published on Wednesday, the WHO said that where the epidemic was spreading, people — including children and students aged 12 or over — should always wear masks in shops, workplaces and schools that lack adequate ventilation and when receiving visitors at home in poorly ventilated rooms.

WATCH | Testing face masks:

We test over 20 different masks and reveal which are the most effective at keeping you safe from COVID-19 and which masks you should avoid. PLUS, how to get a refund on your cancelled flights. 22:30

Masks should also be worn outdoors and in well ventilated indoor spaces where physical distancing of at least one metre can’t be maintained, WHO said.

Last month, Health Canada updated its guidelines saying to “protect yourself and others, wear a non-medical mask or face covering” when:

  • You’re in public and you might come into close contact with others.
  • You’re in shared indoor spaces with people from outside your immediate household
  • Advised by your local public health authority.

In all scenarios, masks needed to be accompanied by other precautions such as hand-washing, WHO said.

Depending on the type, WHO said masks can be used either for protection of healthy persons or to prevent transmission.

Medical masks to care for patients

In areas of COVID-19 spread, WHO also advised “universal” wearing of medical masks in health-care facilities, including when caring for other patients.

The advice applied to visitors, outpatients and to common areas such as cafeterias and staff rooms.

Health-care workers could wear N95 respirator masks if available when caring for COVID-19 patients, but their only proven protection is when they are doing aerosol-generating procedures which carry higher risks, the WHO said.

It recommended that people doing vigorous physical activity not wear masks, citing some associated risks, particularly for people with asthma.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

B.C. sets record for COVID-19 patients in hospital, ICU, and deaths in a day – Kamsack Times

Published

 on


The number of British Columbians dying from COVID-19-related complications has started to ramp up, with 16 fatalities in the past 24 hours, and 58 deaths in the past four days.

The 16 deaths in a 24-hour period is a record, and it comes on the heels of 42 deaths in a three-day period, which was announced yesterday but not broken down by day. In total 457 people in B.C. have died from the virus.

article continues below

Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry said November 30 that the surge in deaths was not directly linked to the record number of COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICU) because most of the deaths reported yesterday were seniors in long-term care homes who died in those facilities. It was not clear if that pattern continued today.

Nonetheless, the number of COVID-19 patients in hospital and in ICU hit a record yesterday as well as today. There are now 336 such patients in hospital – up 20 from yesterday. The number of COVID-19-infected patients in ICU rose by one, compared with yesterday, and is now at 76.

Some good news is that the number of people actively infected with the virus has fallen by 59, to 8,796.

There were 656 new COVID-19 infections identified in B.C. in the past day, including three epi-linked cases, which are presumed and not based on tests. That brings the total number of people infected by the virus in B.C., since the COVID-19 first arrived on January 28, to 33,894.

The breakdown of where the new infections are located is as follows:

• 140 in Vancouver Coastal Health;
• 408 in Fraser Health;
• 10 in Island Health;
• 83 in Interior Health; and
• 15 in Northern Health.

One seniors’ facility, the Harrison at Elim Village in Surrey, which recently had an outbreak that was deemed to be over, once again is listed as having an outbreak.

Outbreaks at Holy Family Hospital in Vancouver and Jackman Manor in the Township of Langley are newly declared to be over.

Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix said in their afternoon statement that there were no new community outbreaks.

That leaves a total of 61 outbreaks at healthcare facilities or seniors’ homes.
The five ongoing active outbreaks at acute-care facilities, or hospitals, are at:

• Burnaby Hospital in Burnaby;
• Langley Memorial Hospital in Langley;
• Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver;
• Ridge Meadows Hospital in Maple Ridge; and
• Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey;
The 56 outbreaks at seniors’ homes are broken down by health region.

There are 15 active outbreaks at seniors’ facilities in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, and they include:

• Arbutus Care Centre in Vancouver;
• Banfield Pavilion, in Vancouver;
• Revera Capilano Care Centre in West Vancouver;
• Columbus Residence in Vancouver;
• German Canadian Care Home in Vancouver;
• Lakeview Care Centre in Vancouver;
• Little Mountain Place in Vancouver;
• Renfrew Care Centre in Vancouver;
• Royal Ascot Care Centre in Vancouver;
• Royal Arch Masonic Home long-term care facility in Vancouver;
• St. Judes Anglican Home in Vancouver;
• Three Links Care Centre long-term care facility in Vancouver;
• Villa Cathay Care Home in Vancouver;
• Windermere Care Centre in Vancouver; and
• Youville Residence in Vancouver.

The 33 outbreaks at seniors’ facilities in the ​Fraser Health region include:

• Agassiz Seniors Community in Agassiz;
• Agecare Harmony Court Estates in Burnaby;
• Agecare Court Estates in Burnaby;
• Al Hogg Pavilion in White Rock;
• Amenida Seniors Community in Surrey;
• Amica White Rock in White Rock
• Belvedere Care Centre in Coquitlam;
• CareLife Fleetwood in Surrey;
• Chartwell Langley Gardens in Langley;
• Cottage-Worthington Pavilion in Abbotsford;
• Fellburn Care Centre long-term care facility in Burnaby;
• Finnish Manor in Burnaby;
• Fleetwood Villa Retirement Residence in Surrey;
• Fort Langley Seniors Community in Fort Langley;
• George Derby Centre in Burnaby;
• Good Samaritan Delta View Care Center 2 long-term care facility in Delta;
• Harrison Pointe retirement home in Langley;
• Harrison at Elim Village in Surrey;
• Hawthorne Seniors Care Community long-term care in Port Coquitlam;
• Hawthorne Seniors Care Community assisted living in Port Coquitlam;
• Hollyrood Manor long-term care home in Maple Ridge;
• Jackman Manor in Langley Township;
• Laurel Place long-term care facility in Surrey;
• Menno Home in Abbotsford;
• Morgan Place Care Society in Surrey;
• Northcrest Care Centre in Delta;
• PICS Assisted Living in Surrey;
• Queen’s Park Care Centre in New Westminster;
• Sunset Manor in Chilliwack;
• Tabor Home in Abbotsford;
• The Residence at Clayton Heights in Surrey;
• The Residence in Mission;
• Valley Haven Care Home in Chilliwack; and
• White Rock Senior Village in White Rock.

There are two outbreaks at seniors’ homes in Northern Health: North Peace Seniors Housing Society buildings in Fort St. John, and Rotary Manor Dawson Creek in Dawson Creek.

Three outbreaks are at seniors’ living facilities in the Island Health region:

• Tsawaayuss-Rainbow Gardens in Port Alberni;
• Discovery Care Centre in Campbell River; and
• Veterans Memorial Lodge at Broadmead in Victoria.

The Interior Health region has three seniors’ facility outbreaks, at:

• Orchard Manor in Kelowna;
• Mountainview Village in Kelowna; and
• Sun Pointe Village in Kelowna.

Henry said that it can be hard to tell how the virus gets into seniors’ care facilities – whether the transmission starts with staff or with visitors.

“We’ve restricted visitors in long term care, as you know, because of the devastation,” Henry said yesterday. “We only have to look at this weekend to know what happens when the virus gets in.”

gkorstrom@biv.com

@GlenKorstrom
 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending