Connect with us

Media

Social media, public perception two main challenges women face in municipal race – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Rothesay councillor Tiffany Mackay French remembers being in her early 20s when Tory MLA Margaret-Ann Blaney was referred to as “Barbie” at the Legislature.

“Nobody says those things about a man, right? They just don’t,” she said. “That’s what I was seeing and that’s not a very nice image to have. Why would you want to be called that in the media and not be taken seriously?”

Social media and perception are the two main challenges women face when running for election, she said.

To address the problem, she created See Jane Run, a grassroots organization to help Saint John women who are interested in running for office.

See Jane Run will host online sessions on how to campaign leading up to the municipal election, starting tomorrow at 7 p.m. with a session on platform design.

Other sessions include board effectiveness, online image and social media, civics 101, team management, media preparation for public speaking and a panel with current councillors. 

She said the organization hopes to convince some women to run in the municipal campaign, with nominations closing on April 9 at 2 p.m.

She said when she ran in Rothesay in 2016, she didn’t receive training after she was elected. Instead, she took a course on board effectiveness on her own.

“I really wanted to create this because I wished I had it in 2016,” she said.

“It leads to better decision-making, it’s better policy.” ​– Rothesay councillor Tiffany Mackay French on the presence of women in politics.

She said when candidates run for office, they have to open up about themselves. and with social media playing a big role in campaigning, both good and bad can things happen. Often, female candidates get the brunt of the negativity.

Trolls push disrespectful comments which they wouldn’t normally say in person, she said. 

“When candidates’ privacy is infringed and when people make personal attacks, it’s a horrible experience for people to go through,” she said.

She said municipal politics is a great way of getting more women involved and the “perfect first step” for a career in politics.

When she ran for Rothesay in 2016, Mackay French had three children in elementary school.  So, at the municipal level, she said politicians don’t have to travel much and don’t need to represent a party, which can make a difference.

“With the municipal elections coming up, that’s a great message to give to women,” she said.

She said some of the social media attacks can come from party politics.

“That’s where the kind of bickering starts and sometimes it gets very nasty. That doesn’t take place in municipal politics as much.” 

More women elected at provincial level

Former provincial NDP Leader Elizabeth Weir is one of the founders of Women for 50%, a group similar to See Jane Run, designed to help women with campaigning at the provincial level.

Elizabeth Weir is part of Women for 50%, an organization that helps women with campaigning at the provincial level. (Government of New Brunswick)

The group ran a survey after last September’s provincial election where approximately half of the 74 female candidates participated. Weir said only four per cent of women in the survey said they will definitely not run again.

Another 24 per cent said they will not likely run again. 

Still, Weir told Information Morning Saint John that she is surprised by the number.

“These are women candidates who went through I think the hardest election, probably in the history of this province, you know for any candidate, in a pandemic, a quick election call,” she said.

“There also was an increase in the number of candidates who thought the atmosphere was open and welcoming for women, which surprised the heck out of me.”

A difference in policy

Mackay French said she has approached women considering running for office but said their first response is often that they are nervous about the negative attention they will receive from social media. 

Still, she said it’s important to have women in politics because they bring diverse perspectives.

“It leads to better decision-making, it’s better policy,” she said.

Mackay French said women feel supported when they feel like they have a group of women to lean on and to lift them up.

She said it’s also important to speak to younger girls and let them know who the female leaders in their community are.

“Just so they know that it’s possible and they saw those examples of women growing up.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Sir David Amess: Priest quits social media over MP last rites abuse – BBC News

Published

 on


Fr Jeff Woolnough

A priest said he felt forced to delete his Twitter account after being accused of not doing enough to administer last rites to Sir David Amess.

Fr Jeffrey Woolnough said he rushed to the scene on 15 October when he heard the MP – a devout Catholic – had been stabbed in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex.

Fr Woolnough said criticism he had since received was “hurtful”.

“Most people have been so kind with messages of support, others have accused me of capitulating at the scene,” he said.

“The police have a job to do. When I say I have to respect it, it doesn’t mean I agree with it.

“But I have to respect as a law-abiding citizen that the police would not allow me in and I had to find plan B, and plan B for me was prayer, and I had to pray on the spot, pray on the rosary.”

Flowers and tributes at the scene near Belfairs Methodist Church

PA Media

Fr Woolnough is the parish priest at St Peter’s Catholic Church, Eastwood, Southend, close to where Sir David was killed.

He said he “foolishly” tried to defend his actions on social media but it “stirred up a hornet’s nest” so he deleted his Twitter account.

“I was trying to let people know I had tried my very best but apparently my best wasn’t good enough,” he said.

Fr Woolnough said he had since had telephone conversations with “some really top priests in the hierarchy” who told him he “did the right thing”.

Sir David Amess

PA Media

The intention is to add it to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

The man accused of killing Sir David will face trial next year. Ali Harbi Ali, 25, of Kentish Town in north London, is charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts.

An inquest into the death of Sir David is due to be opened by the Essex coroner on Wednesday.

presentational grey line

Find BBC News: East of England on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. If you have a story suggestion email eastofenglandnews@bbc.co.uk

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Media Advisory: Minister Abbott to Introduce New Accessibility Legislation – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Published

 on


The Honourable John G. Abbott, Minister of Children, Seniors and Social Development, will be available to media to discuss proposed new accessibility legislation prior to debate in the House of Assembly today (Monday, October 25) at 12:00 p.m. in the media centre, East Block, Confederation Building.

The event will be live streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Facebook, YouTube and Twitter accounts.

Media covering the announcement will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media planning to participate should register with Khadija Rehma (khadijarehma@gov.nl.ca) by 10:00 a.m. today (Monday, October 22).

Technical Briefing
Prior to the announcement, a technical briefing for media will be provided at 11:00 a.m.

Media participating in the briefing will also have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media who wish to participate in the technical briefing should RSVP to Khadija Rehma (khadijarehma@gov.nl.ca), who will provide the details and the required information.

Media must join the teleconference at 10:45 a.m. (NST) to be included on the call. For sound quality purposes, registered media are asked to use a land line if at all possible.

– 30 –

Media contact
Michelle Hunt Grouchy
Children, Seniors and Social Development
709-729-5148, 682-6593
michellehuntgrouchy@gov.nl.ca

2021 10 25
9:04 am

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Racism allegations on social media defamed Ottawa women, judge rules – CBC.ca

Published

 on


A judge has ordered an Ottawa woman to pay $100,000 in damages for embarking on what he called a “brutal and unempathetic campaign” against two women in a defamation case centred around a video posted just days after the murder of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer.

The defendant’s lawyer, Cedric Nahum, says he plans to appeal the decision, which also subjects his client to a permanent injunction that limits her speaking about the case.

“We found the decision quite disappointing. I think it could do a lot to muzzle conversation in relation to race issues,” said Nahum.

He also says the judge didn’t adequately take into account the perspective of his client Solit Isak, who identifies as Black, in the context of George Floyd’s death in interpreting the case.

The other side, meanwhile, called the judge’s decision a “vindication of their reputation” after a traumatic experience that included the loss of employment and threats against them and their family. 

Allegations of racism on social media

The case followed a social media firestorm in June 2020 after a screenshot from the Snapchat account of Shania Lavallee was taken from a May 30 video of her sister Justine being pinned down by Shania’s boyfriend Gilmour Driscoll-Maurice — who held her hands behind her and had his knee on her back.

Isak saw the screenshot just days after Floyd was murdered by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck.

Isak, who admitted to never seeing the video, proceeded to make more than 100 social media posts accusing the women of mocking Floyd’s death, tagging their employers, and encouraging other people to do the same and share information about them. 

Those posts were also republished and amplified.

This screengrab from the Snapchat video posted May 30, 2020 by Shania Lavallee was circulated and led to a social media campaign against her and her sister Justine. (Plaintiff’s Motion Record)

On June 1, Shania issued an apology online, saying in part, “I meant absolutely no disrespect and didn’t mean to hurt or offend anyone. In the video, they were play fighting as they always do and in retrospect I can see how the video could be taken out of context given the current situation and I now see how insensitive it is.

“It was wrong of me to be inconsiderate of the sensitive times at hand and by no means did I use this as a representation of what happened with George Floyd.”

Shania lost her job at Boston Pizza in Orléans, as well as a teaching job offer at the Ottawa Catholic School Board. Justine lost her job at the Canada Border Services Agency, as well as failed a character check in her application for work with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The Lavallees said they also had to leave their home to avoid death threats and vandalism. 

On June 5, the sisters’ lawyer asked Isak to take down her posts and issue an apology threatening to sue for defamation. Isak had filed a counterclaim by the end of that month.

In the summary of his decision, Justice Marc Smith said Isak “blindly embarked on a brutal and unempathetic campaign to destroy the lives of two young women” and didn’t have the factual basis for her claims of racism. 

Shania had told court they had posted similar “play fighting” videos in the past and at no point in the video did they mention Floyd or refer to “police brutality.” 

While they were not able to recover the video, which Snapchat deletes automatically after 24 hours, the plaintiffs provided statements from two friends who saw the video supporting that claim. 

The judge accepted the plaintiff’s story and it wasn’t challenged by the defendant.

However, Isak’s lawyer said the particulars of the video were less important than the context of when it was published. 

The defendant’s submissions noted around the same time, other viral images were being circulated online of a so-called “George Floyd challenge” where social media users appeared to imitate the kneeling position in jest. 

 “I don’t think that the judge was able to put himself in the place of a young Black person in the days after the murder of George Floyd,” Nahum said.

“He likely wouldn’t be able to do so as a white judge.”

Sisters ‘sensitive’ to acts of racism

The Lavallees’ lawyer Charles Daoust said it has been a “long, traumatic year for them, but they are happy now to be able to vindicate their reputations.”

“The message from the court is clear that people really should be careful before levelling very serious accusations on the internet, especially to have evidence,” said Daoust.

In a statement, the sisters said as members of the Indigenous community they are sensitive to acts of racism, but the events in 2020 “did not, in any way, relate to racism.”

In court, the plaintiffs filed Native Alliance of Quebec (NAQ) membership cards to claim they are Inuit. NAQ cards are not federally recognized identification

The CBC asked which land claim organization they belong to, which is how official identification as Inuit is recognized, and Daoust said his clients had no further comment.

Limits of free speech 

Isak is not required to issue an apology, but the permanent injunction prevents her from publishing any further “defamatory statements” about the Lavallees. 

Nahum said his client is now saddled with $100,000 in debt at the beginning of her adult life and this raises concerns about other people who might seek to speak out against racism. 

“When we’re looking at who has been told not to speak here, we’re looking at the voice of a young Black woman, as opposed to all the other news media outlets or other people who had commented on the situation,” Nahum said. 

Hilary Young, a law professor at the University of New Brunswick, argued she doesn’t think the decision will have a chilling effect on people calling out racist behaviour. 

“I think the law is clear that if there is some basis for you to conclude that someone is racist, there are protections of fair comment that will protect your right to state that opinion. But that’s not unlimited.” she said.

“If you harm someone’s reputation, your good intentions aren’t good enough to get you off the hook.”

Young said the judge did weigh Isak’s intention of denouncing racism in assessing damages and didn’t call for punitive damages to be paid on top of the general damages.

Social media has increased the use of permanent injunctions so defamatory posts can be removed in an effort to repair damaged reputations, she said.

It’s also become more common for private individuals to be involved in defamation cases, which used to primarily play out between public figures and journalists or publishers.

“Now in the internet era, you see a lot more cases where you just have individuals making allegations about other individuals and they haven’t done their research or done a lot of effort to get their facts right,” Young said.

Employers’ due diligence

The judge also said third parties not directly involved in the case should have done more diligence to review the evidence and the sisters’ version of the story.

Daoust said his clients are considering their options regarding the employers who fired the sisters or rescinded offers of employment. 

In a statement, the Canada Border Services Agency said as a law enforcement agency its employees must be held to the highest standard of conduct, including in day-to-day activities. The agency said it has “no intention of revisiting its decision in this case.”

The RCMP said it could not comment on an individual’s security clearance for privacy reasons, and should an individual re-apply they would be evaluated according to Treasury Board standards.

The Ottawa Catholic School Board declined to comment on the judge’s decision. Boston Pizza did not respond to CBC’s request for comment.

Ottawa Morning7:54Racism allegations on social media defamed Ottawa women, judge rules

A judge has ordered an Ottawa woman to pay $100,000 in damages for embarking on what he called a “brutal and unempathetic campaign” against two women in a defamation case centred around a video posted just days after the murder of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer. 7:54

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending