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Son of 2 Portapique victims says 2011 warning on gunman should have prevented attack – MSN Canada

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© CBC
Ryan Farrington lost his mother, Dawn Madsen, and stepfather, Frank Gulenchyn, in the mass shooting in April.

The son of two people killed in last month’s mass shooting in Nova Scotia believes a 2011 warning to police that gunman Gabriel Wortman had a stash of guns and wanted “to kill a cop” should have prevented the tragedy from ever happening.

The tip, according to records recently obtained by CBC News, was sent to police agencies across Nova Scotia, but RCMP can’t say what, if anything, was done with it.

“I’m angry more than anything. I’m angry that 22 people lost their lives and I really, truly believe that this could have been prevented,” said Ryan Farrington, whose mother and stepfather, Dawn Madsen and Frank Gulenchyn, were killed in the April 18-19 massacre.

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Farrington’s parents lived in Portapique, N.S., and moved from Oshawa, Ont., 10 years ago. Farrington’s mother was originally from Nova Scotia and always wanted to move back. The couple loved living by the ocean.

Farrington said there are still a lot of unanswered questions about the tragedy, as well as the 2011 tip.

An RCMP spokesperson said the force typically keeps warnings like that for only two years.

“We can’t speak about specifics of the follow-up to the 2011 bulletin because our database records have been purged as per our retention policies,” Cpl. Jennifer Clarke said in an email.

“Preliminary indications are that we were aware and at minimum provided assistance to [Halifax Regional Police], which aligns with the RCMP’s approach for such enquiries (sic).”

The tip was initially sent to the Truro Police Service, who then shared it with Criminal Intelligence Service of Nova Scotia, a network of policing agencies that share information.

Halifax Regional Police did investigate the tip at the time because Wortman has a home in Dartmouth, but determined any information about weapons was related to his cottage property in Portapique, which was outside its jurisdiction. Halifax Regional Police said that information was shared with the RCMP.



a car parked on a dirt road: Police say Gabriel Wortman torched several homes, including his own in Portapique, in the midst of a shooting rampage in April. Nine years earlier, police agencies across the province were warned he had a stash of guns and wanted 'to kill a cop,' according to documents obtained by CBC News.


© Steve Lawrence/CBC
Police say Gabriel Wortman torched several homes, including his own in Portapique, in the midst of a shooting rampage in April. Nine years earlier, police agencies across the province were warned he had a stash of guns and wanted ‘to kill a cop,’ according to documents obtained by CBC News.

“I don’t understand why [the 2011 bulletin] would be erased after two years, knowing that there is a highly volatile person in the area, especially mainly with the weapons being at his Portapique addresses,” Farrington said.

He said he was told by RCMP that the Truro police had information that could have prevented the massacre, but that it wasn’t shared with them.

“There’s just so much we need to know and we’re not getting answers,” Farrington said.

He hopes the federal government calls a public inquiry that would address questions such as what the RCMP knew and when, how Wortman was able to bring in weapons illegally across the Canada-U.S. border, how he was able to get a police uniform and outfit his vehicle to look like an RCMP cruiser.

Federal inquiry

Nova Scotia Justice Minister Mark Furey told CBC’s Mainstreet on Friday that an inquiry into the shooting should be handled by the federal government because there are limits to what the province could do.

Furey, who is a retired Mountie, said many of the major players involved in the situation are federal agents, including the RCMP, the Canada Border Services Agency and the firearms registry.

He said an inquiry should be collaborative so the agencies that answer to different levels of government would be compelled to answer questions and implement any recommendations made.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Nova Scotia Justice Minister Mark Furey would not say whether Nova Scotia would launch a provincial inquiry if the federal government decides not to launch an inquiry into the mass shooting.


© Craig Paisley/CBC
Nova Scotia Justice Minister Mark Furey would not say whether Nova Scotia would launch a provincial inquiry if the federal government decides not to launch an inquiry into the mass shooting.

Furey would not say if Nova Scotia would seek an inquiry if the federal government doesn’t.

“Those would be circumstances I would address at the time,” he said.

If you are seeking mental health support during this time, here are resources available to Nova Scotians. 

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Canada’s economy creates almost 1 million jobs in June – Canada Immigration News

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Canada immigration levels May 2020 Express EntryLifting coronavirus-related lockdown restrictions around the country has sparked the beginning of Canada’s economic recovery.

Many Canadians and permanent residents returned to work for their previous employers while others started new jobs.

Between February and April, a total of 3 million people lost their jobs due to the lockdown, and another 2.5 million were absent from work due to coronavirus-related reasons, according to a Statistics Canada report published on Friday.

May saw a slow start of economic recovery as 290,000 people returned to work. Building on this, the month of June helped alleviate low unemployment rates across the country as employment increased by a record 953,000 people.

Find out if you are eligible for any Canadian immigration programs

These last two months saw the labour market recover by a staggering 40%. Over 1.24 million people gained employment, after 3 million people lost their jobs earlier in the year.

Canada’s overall unemployment rate dropped from 13.7% in May to 12.3% in June.

In addition, the report says that labour force participation rate has increased substantially over the last two months up to 63.8% in June. In comparison, it was 65.5% in February, before coronavirus-related restrictions.

The labour force participation rate is the percentage of the population, aged 15 or older, who are part of the labour force.

This suggests that many people are now more optimistic about the potential of finding a job. The Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB)’s requirement to actively search for work may be another factor. The CESB was introduced to alleviate financial struggles of students who may have been affected by the coronavirus-related restrictions

Moreover, the number of people who work less than half of their usual hours also decreased in June to 26.9% down from 34.3%.

The rise of employment across all provinces is largely aligned with the easing of lockdown restrictions.

Employment in Ontario increased by 378,000 (or 5.9%), Quebec by 248,000 (or 6.5%) and British Columbia by 118,000 (or 5.4%).

As Canada begins reopening its economy, many Canadians and permanent residents have returned to work or have begun looking for work.

In addition, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has returned to normal in terms of Express Entry draws. The latest draw held was an all-program draw. This means that candidates for the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) and the Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSTC) were also considered.

Since the travel restrictions were put in place to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, IRCC had been holding program-specific draws, alternating between Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) draws and Canadian Experience Class (CEC) draws.

Canada’s latest job statistics is good news for these immigrants since they can expect a stronger job market once they have obtained permanent residence.

Find out if you are eligible for any Canadian immigration programs

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COVID-19: Alberta reports 77 new cases on Friday, death count falls by 1 – CTV News

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Alberta reported 77 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, bringing its total number of cases to 8,596.

There are 592 active cases across the province and 7,844 people have recovered from the coronavirus. 

The province’s death count fell by one on Friday, from 161 to 160. The number of COVID-19-related deaths fell from 18 to 17.

“One of the deaths reported at the Misericordia has been determined to not have COVID-19 as a contributing cause of death,” a spokesman for the province told CTV News.

The city of Edmonton has now surpassed 1,000 total cases, with 1,001. Its number of active cases sits at 173.

More than 510,000 COVID-19 tests have now been completed in Alberta. 

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Edmonton, Calgary top Canadian cities in unemployment – CTV News Edmonton

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Alberta has the second-worst provincial unemployment rate in Canada after Newfoundland and Labrador..

According to new Statistics Canada data, unemployment reached 15.5 per cent in June.

It marks an 8.8 per cent difference from the same time last year.

The only province with a higher unemployment rate is Newfoundland and Labrador, at 16.5 per cent.

And unemployment in Alberta’s largest cities is also highest among Canadian major urban centres: about 15.7 per cent of the Edmonton workforce is currently unemployed, and 15.6 per cent of the Calgary workforce.

In May, their unemployment rates were 13.6 per cent and 13.4 per cent, respectively.

The news comes alongside a report that Canada added 953,000 jobs in June as businesses forced to close by the pandemic began to reopen.

“That’s important progress but we have a long way to go,” Alberta Premier Jason Kenney commented Friday at a news conference in Fort Saskatchewan, where a carbon capture and storage facility recently reached the five-million equivalent tonnes milestone.

Kenney’s government’s economic recovery plan centres on infrastructure projects that create jobs and making Alberta an attractive place for investment – as does the facility at the Shell Scotford complex, Kenney said.

“Projects like this are a key part of Alberta’s recovery plan to build, to diversify, and to create jobs. When the global economy comes back form COVID, when demand returns for oil and gas, we are going to see, I believe, something of a supply shortage because of all the upstream exploration that has been cancelled, and so we’ll see prices go up. And that will be a great opportunity for Alberta, especially as we make progress on pipelines,” he said.

“But there’s one critical factor, we’ve got to bring investment back. And that means we’ve got to demonstrate our progress on environmental responsibility which is why investments like this… are so important to jobs, the economy, and the future prosperity of Alberta.”

The national unemployment rate fell to 12.3 per cent after hitting a record-high of 13.7 per cent in May.

With files from CTVNews.ca

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