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South Africa Sets Sights on $250 Billion in Hydrogen Investment

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(Bloomberg) — South Africa set its sights on attracting as much as $250 billion into its nascent green hydrogen industry by 2050 to take advantage of abundant solar and wind energy sources.

The industry could create 1.4 million jobs and generate as much as $30 billion in annual revenue by that year, according to Masopha Moshoeshoe, a green economy specialist in the South African Presidency’s investment and infrastructure office.

Green hydrogen, which is made by splitting water using renewable energy, is one of three key ways South Africa is pursuing to shift its economy away from a reliance on coal, which currently accounts for more than 80% of its electricity. The others are developing an electric-vehicle industry and shifting power production to wind and solar power.

The plan, included in a presentation by Moshoeshoe at the COP27 international climate conference in Egypt on Monday, would involve South Africa exporting as much as eight million tons of the clean-burning fuel and its derivatives by 2050 and satisfying local demand of between two and five million tons, he said.

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While other African countries such as Morocco and Namibia have already positioned themselves as potential hydrogen producers, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has increased interest in supply and created more opportunities for cooperation, he said.

The war has driven up natural gas prices and threatened security of supply. Investment funds, governments and utilities are pledging to spend billions of dollars on markets for the clean fuel.

The potential is for the country to supply between 4% and 8% of the global market for ammonia, which is produced using hydrogen, with a focus on supplying South Korea and Japan, he said.

Daunting Task

Even so, the numbers needed to make the strategy a success are daunting.

Between 140,000 megawatts and 300,000 megawatts of renewable-power generation capacity would be needed to supply the industry, compared with the country’s current total power facility capacity of a little over 40,000 megawatts, the presentation showed.

By 2030 alone, between 6,000 and 10,000 megawatts of dedicated renewable energy plants would need to be built to power 3,000 to 5,000 megawatts of electrolyzer capacity, according to figures shown in the presentation. Electrolyzers use electricity to make the hydrogen from water.

A number of bilateral negotiations are taking place between South Africa and potential markets, Moshoeshoe said.

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CPPIB to invest $205-million in IndoSpace's new real estate fund – The Globe and Mail

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John Graham, president & CEO of the CPPIB, speaks at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce’s Annual General Meeting and Convention, in Ottawa, on Oct. 14, 2022.Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

Indian warehouse and parks developer IndoSpace on Monday said the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) will invest $205-million in the company’s new real estate fund.

The investment from Canada’s biggest pension fund is part of IndoSpace’s new fund targeting $600-million in equity commitments.

CPPIB’s latest investment in the Indian property developer will take its partnership with the company to over $1-billion in assets, IndoSpace said in a statement.

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“We have made numerous investments in India’s industrial space, where we see strong demand as the manufacturing sector continues to grow and the e-commerce sector matures,” said Hari Krishna V, Managing Director, Head of Real Estate India at CPPIB.

IndoSpace is a joint venture between the Everstone Group, a Southeast Asia-focused private equity, and U.S.-based investors GLP and Realterm.

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Predictions for the housing market, lower internet costs and stable stocks: Must-read business and investing stories – The Globe and Mail

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As interest rates continue to put pressure on mortgage costs, the Bank of Canada predicts home prices will continue to fall before sales pick up later this year.Justin Tang/The Canadian Press

Getting caught up on a week that got away? Here’s your weekly digest of The Globe and Mail’s most essential business and investing stories, with insights and analysis from the pros, stock tips, portfolio strategies and more.

High interest rates will continue putting pressure on Canada’s housing market

The Bank of Canada this week increased interest rates for the eighth consecutive time but said that it expects to hold off on further hikes to “assess whether monetary policy is sufficiently restrictive to bring inflation back to the 2-per-cent target.” As Mark Rendell reports, the central bank raised its benchmark rate by a quarter of a percentage point, bringing the policy rate to 4.5 per cent, the highest level since 2007. With borrowing costs and mortgage rates at their highest level in years, many potential homebuyers have been shut out of the real estate market, writes Rachelle Younglai. The typical home price across the country is already down 13 per cent from its peak last February amid the bank’s attempts to rein in runaway inflation by reducing access to cheap loans. As such, the bank is predicting home prices will decline further before sales pick up later in the year.

These stocks offer portfolio stability amid rising prices

Rising interest rates were the main contributor to the woes of the stock markets in 2022. Interest-sensitive securities such as REITs, utilities, telecoms and bonds all tumbled as rates steadily increased. Combined with the collapse of tech stocks as the economy that benefited from pandemic lockdowns dissipated, we ended up with all the major stock markets in the red, and the Canadian bond market experiencing its worst loss in four decades. But there were some inflation-beaters. Gordon Pape looks at a number of inflation-beating securities that thrived in a rising price environment and are still doing well, although momentum is slowing.

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The clearest sign that inflation is declining

When assessing inflation, central bankers and economists will often exclude food and energy costs, but in a recent report, Karyne Charbonneau, executive director of economics at CIBC Capital Markets, said the Bank of Canada should consider the rapid climb in mortgage interest costs “when judging the underlying inflationary trend.” As Matt Lundy writes, while the bank is raising interest rates to cool demand and tamp down inflation, its efforts are having the opposite effect on mortgage payments, which have jumped 18 per cent in the past year. Although mortgages carry only 3-per-cent weight in how the Consumer Price Index is calculated, the increase is substantial enough that mortgages are now the largest contributor to annual inflation.

Could lower cellphone and internet costs be coming?

Lowering cellphone and internet bills is a top priority for Vicky Eatrides, the new chair of Canada’s broadcast and telecommunications regulator, Irene Galea reports. Unfortunately, Ms. Eatrides is inheriting a commission that is widely seen as slow to make decisions. The continuing legal proceedings of Rogers Communications Inc.’s takeover of Shaw Communications Inc. are attracting unprecedented attention to the inner workings of the telecom industry and the future of cellular service competition in Canada. Meanwhile, two CTRC policies, concerning industry rates for broadband and wireless networks, finalized during the previous chair’s term, are still being debated among industry players. Ms. Eatrides would not reveal specifics related to her plan to lower cellphone and internet costs, but added she hopes to speed up the commission’s decision-making process.

The real savings of owning an electric vehicle

With gas prices yo-yoing this past year, are the savings associated with the lower operating costs of purchasing an electric vehicle ultimately worth it? David Berman, a Hyundai Ioniq 5 owner, compares charging costs for EVs to gas-powered vehicle costs over the same travelling distance. “I’ve driven almost 10,000 kilometres – did I mention that I don’t drive much?” he writes. “I’ve saved about $780 over the past year. Over 10 years, these savings would rise, theoretically, to a total of $7,800.” Additionally, he got a $5,000 federal EV rebate when purchasing the car in Ontario in early 2022, whittling down the nearly $50,000 list price for his vehicle to about $37,200 compared with a hypothetical gas-burning version of itself.

Record-low rental vacancy rate

There are fewer apartments available to rent in Canada than at any time since 2001, according to Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp’s annual rental report released this week. As Rachelle Younglai reports, the country’s apartment vacancy rate dropped to 1.9 per cent in 2022 down from 3.1 the year before and the lowest level in more than two decades owing to higher net migration, the return of postsecondary students to the campus and the spike in borrowing costs. The country’s largest rental markets were under particular stress, with Toronto’s apartment vacancy rate dropping to 1.7 per cent last year from 4.4 per cent in 2021, Montreal to 2.3 per cent from 3.7 per cent and Vancouver to 0.9 per cent from 1.2 per cent. The national average monthly rental price for a two-bedroom rose 5.6 per cent to $1,258 last year, with Vancouver and Toronto commanding the highest rents at an average of $2,002 and $1,765 monthly.

Sign up for MoneySmart Bootcamp: If you want to improve your financial fitness, The Globe’s MoneySmart Bootcamp newsletter course is for you. This new five-part course written by personal finance reporter Erica Alini will improve your personal finance skills, including budgeting, borrowing and investing. Subscribe to the MoneySmart Bootcamp and you’ll receive an e-mail a week to work a different financial muscle. Lessons will land in your inbox Wednesday afternoons.

Now that you’re all caught up, prepare for the week ahead with the Globe’s investing calendar.

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3 reasons dividend stocks can lead the next bull market

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After a bull market like the one we experienced prior to 2022, it can be tempting to stick to the same investment strategies that have been working. But the underlying economic factors are set to be materially different in the coming years, which means the market is likely to look very different from what we’ve seen in the past 10-plus years.

This sets the stage for a market that grinds higher, led by large, profitable, dividend-paying companies. Here are three reasons dividend stocks can lead the next bull market.

Dividends may make up a larger portion of the total return

Over the past decade, dividends have contributed less than 25 per cent of the S&P 500’s total return, as years of low interest rates helped inflate asset valuations. Historically, though, dividends have made up a larger portion of the market’s total return. Dividends have accounted for an average of 40 per cent of the S&P 500’s total return since the 1930s, according to data from Fidelity Investments.

If inflation remains high, it will be very difficult for the market to grow via multiple expansion as it has during the past 10 years. This opens the door to dividends regressing to the long-term mean and making up a larger percentage of the total return than it has recently.

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Valuations are attractive for dividend stocks

Dividend-paying stocks are currently undervalued relative to the broader market judging by the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio. The P/E for dividend-paying stocks in the S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats was lower than the P/E for the S&P 500 as of Dec. 30, 2022. This suggests dividend-paying stocks may offer better value for investors compared to non-dividend-paying stocks.

This is common during a bear market like the one we experienced last year. The good is thrown out with the bad, as companies with consistent earnings are sold off with the same urgency as less profitable companies. This creates an opportunity that can be identified by using the P/E ratio.

Great companies with robust business models and long histories of profitability rarely go on sale, so this can be a great opportunity to add quality names to a portfolio.

Better track record

Dividend-paying stocks have outperformed non-dividend-paying stocks over long periods of time. A study of the S&P/TSX composite index from 1986 to 2021 by RBC Global Asset Management found that stocks growing their dividend had an average annual return of 11.2 per cent compared to 6.5 per cent for the overall index and an abysmal 1.4 per cent for non-dividend-paying stocks.

This trend has even held up during economic recessions, as dividend-paying stocks have shown to be more stable and less volatile than non-dividend-paying stocks. For example, the same RBC study found that dividend-paying stocks in the composite index had a standard deviation (a measure of volatility) of 13.9 per cent, compared to 23.3 per cent for non-dividend paying stocks. This indicates dividend-paying stocks have been less volatile over the long term.

Despite the potential for market turbulence in the near term, dividend stocks remain a good option for investors looking to weather any upcoming volatility and maximize their returns over the long term.

Remember that investing in the stock market carries risks and a professional investment adviser can help assess your investment goals and risk tolerance and develop a personalized investment strategy tailored to your specific needs and circumstances.

Taylor Burns is an investment adviser at Manulife Securities Inc. and Balanced Financial Wealth Management. The opinions expressed are those of the author and may not necessarily reflect those of Manulife Securities Inc.

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