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SpaceX launches 60 more Starlink satellites ahead of upcoming public beta testing – MobileSyrup

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SpaceX has successfully completed its 13th Starlink mission, with over 700 satellites launched to date.

It launched 60 of its Starlink broadband internet satellites on October 6th after the mission was previously delayed three times, twice due to weather and once because of an unusual sensor reading.

Following the successful launch, Elon Musk tweeted that SpaceX will hopefully be able to launch a public beta in southern Canada once the satellites reach their positions.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US and hopefully southern Canada,” Musk tweeted.

SpaceX is currently conducting private beta testing of Starlink, and revealed that it has achieved download speeds of up to 100Mbps.

The company previously stated that the speeds are fast enough to allow users to stream several HD video streams at the same time while still having bandwidth to spare. SpaceX has noted that the beta tests have shown latency low enough to play multiplayer online games.

SpaceX says although the beta tests have shown impressive results, it believes that future updates will bring more capabilities over time.

Starlink aims to leverage an extensive network of hundreds of low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellites to provide high-speed internet across parts of the U.S. and Canada.

Details about Starlink’s beta tests leaked online in July and revealed the conditions and requirements that participants will have to adhere to. For instance, all beta testers are required to have a clear view of the northern sky to participate. Otherwise, the dish will be unable to make a good connection.

Beta testers are not allowed to reveal details about their participation, and must keep information about things like speeds and quality confidential. If beta testers are found to be partaking in illegal activities, such as storing pirated content, it may suspend or terminate their participation.

Source: SpaceX, Elon Musk

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Is Halloween cancelled this year? – AeroTime News Hub

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The pandemic altered the way we celebrate. Every year US airlines would dress to impress the travelers with Halloween themed decorations and staff parties. This year the holiday might look a little different.

Airlines and Halloween

In the United States, Southwest and American airlines have had a long history of Halloween celebration. In the 1970s, Southwest workers began dressing up for the holiday. Later on, more events, contests and family activities were added and continued till this year. 

The company was proud to show their CEO Gary Kelly dressing up every year. In the past years the airline posted videos of Kelly’s transformation on social media. 

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Southwest passengers were invited to celebrate too. Decorated boarding gates and ticket counters, dressed up aircraft crew and free drinks on board. 

American Airlines (A1G) (AAL) started celebrating Halloween in 2013. Chief Executive Officer Doug Parker initiated the annual celebration that included costumes, parties and employees’ children trick-or-treating. 

This year, due to the pandemic both airlines announced cancellation of the annual Halloween celebration. For Southwest it is the first time dropping the party since 2001, when terrorist attacks hit the US. 

With the airlines industry plummeting down and thousands of job cuts, organising parties is the last thing on companies’ minds. It is not a very celebratory time either – Southwest Airlines (LUV) had about 61,000 employees in June but at least 4,200 agreed to leave. 12,500 more took long-term leaves of absence.

Celebrate Halloween Moon

Even if big gatherings and parties are not happening, there are still ways to celebrate. According to NASA’s National Space Science Data Center on the night of October 31, 2020, a full blue Moon, also called Halloween Moon, will be visible. It is the first occasion of a blue Moon in the Americas since 2018 and the first time it will appear for all time zones since 1944.

The term blue Moon does not mean we will see it in blue color. This Halloween we will probably see it in it’s usual greyish color. However, it has appeared blue in the past due to smoke and dust particles in the atmosphere.

You probably heard the phrase “once in a blue Moon”, which is used to describe something rare and unusual. Do not miss this year’s Halloween moon as the next one will take place in August 2023. 

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Blue moon to light up Halloween sky – KitchenerToday.com

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Not only is it Halloween, but Saturday night also marks two rare lunar events.

We are in for a blue moon and a micromoon.

According to NASA, a blue moon occurs about seven times every 19 years.

The moon will not actually be blue Saturday night, the term refers to the time when a second full moon occurs in one month.

The last full moon was on October 1. 

A micromoon, opposite to a supermoon, is when the moon is at its furthest point from Earth. 

Victor Arora, Observatory Coordinator at the University of Waterloo said not only will the special moon be visible all night, but Mars will also be easy to spot.

“On this evening you’ll be looking at the confluence of these two or three different cosmic events…it makes it a little bit more meaningful…If you want to see the full moon rise just basically look towards the sun, and turn around so your back is against the sun, and that’s the direction the moon will be rising from.” 

Arora added being outdoors and enjoying a unique event such as a blue moon, is a great pandemic-friendly activity.

“There has been an uptick in interest among people wanting to observe in the evenings. Things like telescope sales have gone through the roof – I’ve heard, and spending time with your close circle and getting out into nature.” 

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First Halloween Blue moon in 19 years – CBC.ca

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They call it a blue moon, but it has nothing to do with the colour. It’s really a reference to its rarity.

What is even rarer is for there to be a blue moon on Halloween, says Jack Burnett, managing editor for The Old Farmers Almanac. 

The last one was 19 years ago on Oct. 31, 2001 according to Burnett. 

The blue moon is the second full moon in the same month. 

“It only comes up once, sometimes twice a year,” said Burnett. 

“The moon has always been a mysterious orb in the sky, and it’s always been felt to have sort of mysterious powers,” Burnett said. 

That obsession with the moon goes back to Celtic traditions and the early Christian All Hallows Day celebrated on Nov. 1. The night before, All Hallows Eve, is believed by many to originally be a Celtic harvest festival, which gave the moon great relevance in daily life.

“So because… the moon has always been so mysterious, it’s been associated with Halloween.

And of course, now we see that we have the full hunter’s Blue Moon on Saturday night, it makes it all the more spookier and you know, all the more Halloweenier,” Burnett said. 

Traditionally, hunters would be out hunting for food this time of year using the light of the moon to help them. 

Ever wonder where the saying once in a blue moon comes from? According to Burnett it comes from an old English word that meant betrayed. 

“So that meant that they felt it had betrayed the normal cycles of the moon by showing up, you know, an extra time. So that’s one theory as to how the actual word came about.” 

And is it blue? No, not unless there is ash or something else in the air to make it appear blue, Burnett said.

In addition to the rare full moon on Halloween, don’t forget that early Sunday morning, clocks will also fall back one hour.

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