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SpaceX Starlink: Elon Musk says when it will enter public beta – Inverse

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Starlink, SpaceX’s internet connectivity constellation, is set to offer service to more users than ever.

On Tuesday, CEO Elon Musk shared via Twitter that the company plans a “fairly wide” public beta of the service as soon as the latest satellites “reach their target position.”

This beta service would reach users in the northern United States and “hopefully” southern Canada. From there, Musk stated that the goal would be to expand to other countries “as soon as we receive regulatory approval.”

The comments give an indication about when Starlink will reach users’ homes. The service is designed to offer high-speed, low-latency internet service to almost anyone with a ground terminal pointed at the sky. Starlink aims to offer a better service than competitors by orbiting satellites much lower, at 550 kilometers, and sending up many more, with one application asking to send up 42,000.

SpaceX launched its first batch of satellites in May 2019. The 13th and latest batch, comprising 60 satellites, was launched at 7:29 a.m. Eastern time on Tuesday. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Following the launch, the booster successfully landed on the Of Course I Still Love You droneship, while half of the fairing landed on the Ms.Tree ship.

So when will this week’s satellites reach their target position? Previous experience suggests it could be around four months.

Elias Eccli, a physics student from Innsbruck, Austria, uploaded an updated visualization of the Starlink constellation at the end of August. Eccli, who spoke to Inverse in May about a previous version of his visualization, explained at the time that the chart shows when a craft reaches the desired orbit.

“Once they reach the operational orbit, their velocity exactly matches that of the imaginary reference satellite, so they seem to stop,” he said.

The video shows how the Starlink launch of November 11, 2019 launch gradually spread out in thirds. The first third became operational at the end of December. Most of the batch was operational by the end of March, 2020. These findings are backed up by the Twitter account “StarlinkUpdates,” which shows every batch so far has taken around four months to reach the desired orbit.

This would suggest that a third of the latest batch would be operational by the end of November, with the full batch online early next year.

As for international expansion, Musk suggested that this would depend on regulatory approval. SpaceX has filed applications with the International Telecommunications Union for its satellites. It has also taken steps with Australian authorities to receive approval for its services.

SpaceX’s website claims the company is aiming to start offering services to the northern United States and Canada this year, before moving onto the wider world next year.

In April, 2020, Musk announced plans to offer a private beta in three months and a public beta in six months. The private beta started rolling out in the summer, and documents showed the early phase was targeting users between 44 and 52 degrees latitude.

The Inverse analysis – The latest comments suggest Musk may have slightly revised Starlink’s rollout. On the surface it’s not too surprising, as Musk is so well known for delaying launches that “Elon time” has been added into Urban Dictionary. What is notable is that Starlink had been following the schedule laid out by Musk until now: the private beta did indeed launch around three months after April.

One culprit could be unexpected delays to Starlink launches. The most recent batch was expected to launch on September 17, but weather conditions meant the firm ended up delaying for nearly a month. The previous launch was also delayed from August 30 to September 3 due to bad weather conditions.

Perhaps little wonder then that Musk posted this week about how the firm “will need to make a lot of improvements to have a chance of completing 48 launches next year.”

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OSIRIS-REx collects sample from Bennu asteroid after 2-year orbit – KOKI FOX 23

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“Even though we have some work ahead of us to determine the outcome of the event — the successful contact, the TAGSAM gas firing, and back-away from Bennu are major accomplishments for the team. I look forward to analyzing the data to determine the mass of sample collected,” Dante Lauretta said in a statement, according to CNN. Lauretta is the principal investigator for the mission and is a professor at the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory.

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Space: Astronauts uncovered a leak at the space station ISS with a tea bag – three are back on earth – Pledge Times

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Spacemen of the International Space Station ISS have shown ingenuity. The astronauts made use of a tea bag in space. Three of them have now returned to earth.

  • Russia and the USA share the International space station ISS.
  • However, there is one at the station about 400 kilometers above the earth leak.
  • The crew tried to fix the air leak using a Tea bags to detect.

Update from October 22nd, 4:40 p.m. Three of the astronauts who boarded the International Space Station (ISS) with help of a Tea bags one leak have found (see first report), have returned to Earth safely after almost 200 days on the ISS. The US astronaut Chris Cassidy and the Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Wagner landed on Thursday in the Kazakh steppe, as photos by the Russian space agency Roskosmos show.

The three spacemen were in April ISS broken up. Because of the Corona pandemic Wagner, Iwanischin and Cassidy had to be in quarantine a good month before the start of their six-month mission. At that time they could not personally say goodbye to their families. It was the third mission on board the ISS for Cassidy and Ivanishin. Wagner, on the other hand, made his first flight to the space station. In a tweet before his return to earth, the 35-year-old wrote: “Mom, I’m coming home.”

First report from October 19, 2020: Space: Leak found at space station ISS – household goods are the solution

Moscow – spaceman the International Space Station have a possible Air leak with help of a Tea bags tracked down. This had flown in weightlessness in the direction of the leak, said cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin according to the state agency Tass. “We have several photos and videos of the direction of flight of the teabag.” He reckons with “actually having found the probable leak”. It should start with a duct tape be sealed.

The space travelers have been occupied with the leak in the station about 400 kilometers above the earth for weeks. They had to spend a weekend in the Russian segment in August because they were looking for the hole in another part of the station. According to earlier information from the Russian space agency Roscosmos the leak is “extremely insignificant” and harmless to the astronauts and cosmonauts.

Space station ISS: “Air pressure continues to drop”

“Of the Air pressure continues to fall, but not as quickly, ”said Ivanishin. The crew now wants to better seal the crack and keep an eye on the situation. “Perhaps we should use the more effective patches from our partners,” said the Russian spaceman, referring to his American colleagues.

A short time later that is Oxygen system Elektron-WM failed according to Roscosmos. A spokesman for Roskosmos confirmed, however, that there is no danger for the crew, as the oxygen system in the US segment of the ISS continues to function normally.

ISS: Russian aerospace veteran: “All modules in the Russian segment are worn out”

Currently hold up six spacemen in the ISS. The crew had only last week Reinforcement got after a Soyuz capsule with three spacemen on board after a flight in Record time has docked with the ISS. So far, there have been three space travelers on the ISS, who were also under strict conditions in the spring corona-Pads started. They are supposed to return to earth in October.

It wasn’t until April Oxygen leak found in the ISS, which is more than two decades old. The Russian aerospace veteran Gennadi Padalka told the Ria-Novosti news agency that the station’s Russian equipment had long exceeded its shelf life: “All modules in the Russian segment are worn“Said the cosmonaut who holds the record for the most days spent in space. The equipment was actually only designed for a service life of 15 years. (ck / dpa)

Most recently, an asteroid named “Bennu” was on a dangerous course towards Earth in space. Even a ninth planet in our solar system is said to have been discovered.

List of rubric lists: © Nasa / dpa

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NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Russian counterparts return safely to Earth from space station

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A trio of space travelers safely returned to Earth on Thursday after a six-month mission on the International Space Station.

The Soyuz MS-16 capsule carrying NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, and Roscosmos’ Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner landed on the steppes of Kazakhstan southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan at 7:54 a.m. (2:54 GMT) Thursday.

After a brief medical checkup, the three will be taken by helicopters to Dzhezkazgan from where they will depart home.

Cassidy will board a NASA plane back to Houston, while Vagner and Ivanishin will fly home to Star City, Russia.

In this photo released by Rosaviatsiya, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy sits in a chair shortly after the landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.
(Rosaviatsiya via AP)

The crew smiled as they talked to masked members of the recovery team, and NASA and Roscosmos reported that they were in good condition.

In this photo released by Roscosmos Space Agency, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy sits in a chair shortly after landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.

In this photo released by Roscosmos Space Agency, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy sits in a chair shortly after landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.
(Roscosmos Space Agency, via AP)

As part of additional precautions due to the coronavirus, the rescue team members meeting the crew were tested for the virus and the number of people involved in the recovery effort was limited.

Cassidy, Ivanishin and Vagner spent 196 days in orbit, having arrived at the station on April 9. They left behind NASA’s Kate Rubins and Roscosmos’ Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov, who arrived at the orbiting outpost a week ago for a six-month stay.

In this photo released by Roscosmos Space Agency, Roscosmos' cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin, left, and Ivan Vagner sit in fchairs shortly after the landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.

In this photo released by Roscosmos Space Agency, Roscosmos’ cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin, left, and Ivan Vagner sit in fchairs shortly after the landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.
(Roscosmos Space Agency via AP)

Cassidy, returning from his third space mission, has now spent a total of 378 days in space, the fifth highest among U.S. astronauts.

While serving as the station’s commander, Cassidy welcomed SpaceX Demo-2 crew Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley, the first NASA astronauts to launch to the space station on an American spacecraft from American soil since the retirement of the space shuttle fleet in 2011.

In this photo released by Rosaviatsiya, Roscosmos' cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin sits in a chair shortly after the landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.

In this photo released by Rosaviatsiya, Roscosmos’ cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin sits in a chair shortly after the landing near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020.
(Rosaviatsiya via AP)

Cassidy and Behnken completed four spacewalks for a total of 23 hours and 37 minutes, becoming two of only four U.S. astronauts to complete 10 spacewalks.

In this photo released by Rosaviatsiya, Russian rescue team helicopters land near a Russian Soyuz MS-16 capsule, left, landed near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. Rosaviatsiya via AP

In this photo released by Rosaviatsiya, Russian rescue team helicopters land near a Russian Soyuz MS-16 capsule, left, landed near town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. Rosaviatsiya via AP
(Rosaviatsiya via AP)

Before the crew’s departure, Russian cosmonauts were able to temporarily seal the air leak they tried to locate for several months. The small leak has posed no immediate danger to the station’s crew, and Roscosmos engineers have been working on a permanent seal.

The Soyuz MS-16 capsule carrying NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, and Roscosmos' Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner landed on the steppes of Kazakhstan, southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan, on Thursday.

The Soyuz MS-16 capsule carrying NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, and Roscosmos’ Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner landed on the steppes of Kazakhstan, southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan, on Thursday.
(Roscosmos Space Agency via AP)

In November, Rubins, Ryzhikov and Kud-Sverchkov are expected to greet NASA’s SpaceX first operational Crew Dragon mission comprising NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi.

Source: – Fox News

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