adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Investment

Stock market today: Asian stocks dip on economy worries

Published

 on

TOKYO (AP) — Asian shares were mostly lower Wednesday as worries about the health of global economies grew after a tumble on Wall Street, despite some better-than-expected earnings reports.

Tokyo, Sydney, and Seoul declined while Hong Kong and Shanghai gained in afternoon trading. Oil prices rose.

“From a banking crisis still hovering just beneath the surface to the realization Russia has long-range missiles that are incredibly accurate that no one has the capacity to stop, to the sharply higher China-U.S. tensions, more sanctions against both Russia and China, and the likely further unravelling of global trade and the reemergence of higher inflation, risks are huge,” said Clifford Bennett, chief economist at ACY Securities.

“None of this a pretty picture paints. Yet this is the reality of the current moment.”

300x250x1

Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 shed 0.7% in afternoon trading to 28,416.66. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 slipped nearly 0.1% to 7,316.30. South Korea’s Kospi inched down 0.1% to 2,487.20. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng gained 1.1% to 19,829.04, while the Shanghai Composite added 0.1% to 3,268.47.

“Worsening trade tensions between the U.S. and China continues to weigh on market sentiment. Recent reports suggest that the U.S. has requested South Korean firms not to backfill chip orders to China if U.S.-listed firms are barred access to China, adding to further uncertainty,” said Anderson Alves at ActivTrades.

The S&P 500 fell 1.6% on Tuesday to 4,071.63, breaking out of a weekslong lull. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 1% to 33,530.83 while the Nasdaq composite sank 2% to 11,799.16.

First Republic Bank had the biggest loss in the S&P 500 by far, and its stock nearly halved after it said customers withdrew more than $100 billion during the first three months of the year. That doesn’t include $30 billion in deposits that big banks plugged in to build faith in their rival after the second- and third-largest U.S. bank failures in history shook confidence.

The size of the drop in deposits renewed worries about the U.S. banking system and the risk of an economy-sapping pullback in lending. That overshadowed First Republic’s beating analysts’ expectations for earnings, and its stock plunged 49.4%.

The majority of companies so far this reporting season have been topping expectations, but the bar was set considerably low.

Analysts are forecasting the worst drop in S&P 500 earnings since the spring of 2020, when the pandemic froze the global economy. That’s why Wall Street is focused just as much, if not more, on what companies say about their future prospects as they do about their past three months.

The economy is under stress from high interest rates meant to get inflation under control. High rates can stifle inflation, but only by putting the brakes on the entire economy and hurting investment prices. Big chunks of the economy outside the job market have already begun to slow or contract.

With so much uncertainty about whether inflation can return to the Federal Reserve’s target without causing a recession, “we remain skeptical that markets are out of the woods,” Barclays strategists led by Stefano Pascale said in a report. They also pointed to “the risk of something breaking” in the financial system because of high rates.

A report Tuesday showed that confidence among consumers fell more sharply in April than expected, down to its lowest level since July. That’s a discouraging signal when consumer spending makes up the biggest part of the U.S. economy.

The Federal Reserve meets next week, and much of Wall Street expects it to raise interest rates at least one more time before pausing.

In the bond market, the yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 3.39% from 3.50% late Monday. It helps set rates for mortgages and other important loans.

The two-year yield, which moves more on expectations for Fed action, fell to 3.95% from 4.11%.

In energy trading, benchmark U.S. crude added 69 cents to $77.76 a barrel. Brent crude, the international standard, rose 59 cents to $81.36 a barrel.

In currency trading, the U.S. dollar fell to 133.71 Japanese yen from 133.72 yen. The euro cost $1.0988, inching down from $1.0977.

___

AP Business Writer Stan Choe contributed from New York.

Investment

Governments are continuing to push investment into clean energy amid the global energy crisis – News – IEA

Published

 on


The amount of money allocated by governments to support clean energy investment since 2020 has risen to USD 1.34 trillion, according to the latest update of the IEA’s Government Energy Spending Tracker. Around USD 130 billion of new spending was announced in the last six months – among the slowest periods for new allocations since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

This slowdown may be short-lived, however, as a number of additional policy packages are being considered in Australia, Brazil, Canada, the European Union and Japan. Already, government spending is playing a central role in the rapid growth of clean energy investment and expanding clean technology supply chains, and is set to drive both to set to drive both to new heights in the years ahead. Notably, direct incentives for manufacturers aimed at bolstering domestic manufacturing of clean energy technologies now total around USD 90 billion.

At the same time, governments continue to increase spending on managing the immediate energy price shocks for consumers. Since the start of the global energy crisis in early 2022, governments have allocated USD 900 billion to short-term consumer affordability measures in addition to pre-existing support programmes and subsidies. Around 30% of this affordability spending has been announced in the past six months.

300x250x1

These measures have had a major role in moderating price increases for end users, but the energy crisis nonetheless took a toll on many people’s budgets. According to the IEA’s latest data on end-user prices across 12 countries, which together represent nearly 60% of the global population, the average household spent a higher share of its income on energy in 2022 as energy prices outpaced nominal wage growth. On average, households in major economies spend between 3% and 7% of their incomes to heat and cool their homes, to power appliances and to cook – though shares are higher for low-income households. In most major economies, the share of income spent on energy moved up by less than 1% thanks to government interventions.

At the pump, consumers felt the impact more acutely, especially in emerging markets and developing economies, where transport fuels accounted for the joint largest increase in household spending in 2022 alongside food. Without government intervention, this would have been much higher. This was the case in Indonesia, where the average household total energy expenditure would have tripled in 2022 were it not for affordability support.

Early numbers for 2023 show that wholesale energy prices are easing. However, retail prices are unlikely to fall as quickly. High prices are already making clean energy technologies more cost competitive, notably electric vehicles and heat pumps, which saw record sales in 2022. As high prices persist, the uptake of clean energy technologies is set to accelerate further, hastening the emergence of the new energy economy.

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Brexit scaremongering proven wrong as London seals major investment in Europe – GB News

Published

 on


The UK attracted the highest amount of inward direct investment in 2022, extending its lion’s share of the European market to more than a quarter.

Releasing figures sure to infuriate pro-EU activists, the annual Ernst & Young (EY) attractiveness survey found foreign investors flocked to the City to fund 46 financial services projects last year, up from 39 in 2021.


300x250x1

By comparison, second place Paris enticed foreign investment for 35 finance proposals, sliding from 38 in 2021, while Madrid secured 22 foreign investment projects compared to 29 in 2021.

Anna Anthony, UK financial services managing partner at EY, said: “Investors recognise the strength, gold-standard governance and resilience of the UK’s financial system and see it as the preferred destination for growth, innovation and access to top talent.”

The Square Mile continues to be a beacon of prosperity

PA

Overall, the UK attracted foreign investment to 76 financial services projects in 2022, a 17 per cent rise on the 63 projects in 2021.

It puts clear blue water between the UK and France, which recorded 45 projects in total, down 15 on 2021 figures.

Andrew Griffith, economic secretary to the Treasury, told City AM: “We have a tremendous track record of attracting the brightest and best companies in the world built on the long standing competitive advantages of the UK and its attractiveness as a place to do business.”

The UK has topped EY consultancy’s finance foreign direct investment table every year since the research started, including every year since the 2016 Brexit vote.

Jeremy Hunt and team outside Number 10 Downing Street

Andrew Griffith pictured second to the right

PA

Likewise, London has led the European city table since it was first recorded in 1986.

America was the biggest source of foreign investment in financial services in Europe last year, accounting for 21 of the UK’s 76 projects in 2022.

Financial services investment projects created 2,603 jobs in the UK last year, a rise of four per cent on 2021.

Across Europe, 10,700 new jobs were created in financial services, of which 1,700 were recorded in France.

EY Building

EY’s home in Canary Wharf at 25 Churchill Place

Cushman and Wakefield

Chris Hayward, policy chairman at the City of London Corporation, said: “London continues to lead Europe in attracting foreign direct investment in financial services, and the sector is proving resilient despite the global challenges facing the UK economy.”

Hayward added: “That is good news for every household, because a strong City creates the wealth and jobs that support the economy and fund our public services.”

EY has undergone a UK leadership shake up recently following a collapse in the consultancy firm’s plan to break up its audit and consulting operations globally.

The break up blueprint, coined ‘Project Everest’, attracted fierce internal criticism and was eventually abandoned but not before it had cost the firm £480million worth of internal work.

On the back of ditching the radical overhaul, EY has shrunk the UK executive committee from 13 to eight and announced that it will cut 3,000 jobs in the US.

The big four consultancy firm reported record levels of growth for its UK business in November 2022, with UK revenues up 17.2 per cent and UK fee income increasing to £3.23billion from £2.75billion.

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Investment grade will boost realty

Published

 on

The local property market stands to reap significant benefits, both short-term and long-term, from a likely credit rating upgrade to investment level for Greece.

Industry executives say that would be a very positive development, as, after 14 years, the Greek real estate market will return to the “elite” of investment destinations and it will become easier to attract foreign investment groups and funds.

“There is an objective problem right now regarding the implementation of investments by a number of institutional investors, as there are rules that prohibit the placement of funds in countries below investment grade. In other words, even if there was an investment opportunity and they were willing to take the risk, such an investment would be cut off by the investment committee of the respective group, because it is not allowed to invest in countries that do not have a positive credit rating,” Tassos Kotzanastassis, ULI global management committee executive and CEO of international real estate investment management company 8G Group, tells Kathimerini.

300x250x1

Securing investment grade means the Greek property market will get back on the “radar” of large institutional investors and state groups that have a long-term investment horizon. This is a development that contradicts speculative moves by a portion of institutions that have been placed in Greece, with a purely short-term horizon, aiming to secure a quick profit and exit from the country.

However, as Kotzanastassis warns, new investments from large foreign funds should not be expected, at least not immediately. “In this period, at the international level, there is significant uncertainty and investors appear restrained. Many are looking for investment opportunities in the form of distressed assets,” he emphasizes.

One of the market’s perennial problems is it is shallow, so it is difficult to create economies of scale that maximize the return on an investment. Another key point is that all foreign investors of this scope are looking for properties with green characteristics, in the context of the ESG policy they follow. Such properties are still rare in this market, constituting a very small minority in relation to the total stock.

 

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending