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Submit your art to be displayed in Fort Sask city facilities – FortSaskOnline.com

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The City of Fort Saskatchewan wants to show off its people’s talent. 

They’re looking for public submissions as part of the Art in Public Places program. 

“It’s a great program to get community art into the eyes of the community,” explained Shell Theatre supervisor Josh Gennings. 

City council approved a budget to purchase up to two pieces of art to put on public display. One from an adult visual artist in the community, and another from a student artist. 

The work will be displayed in various city facilities for public enjoyment.  

“It’s a great way to foster the creativity in our community for sure,” he said. “We usually do get a fair amount of submissions, and that’s so great. That means the visual arts is thriving in our community.” 

Artists can take several different avenues with their submissions, including sculptures, mixed media and photography; Gennings says there is no limit to the medium used. 

The deadline to submit artwork is Apr.1. Artwork must be original and created within the last three years. 

A selection committee for the Art in Public Places program, made up of mayor, the culture services director, and up to three members of the local arts community, will judge submissions based on the following criteria: 

  • The artist fosters art and culture in the Fort Saskatchewan community. 
  •  The artwork will be of lasting value and artistic merit and enhance the City of Fort Saskatchewan’s Art in Public Places program collection.  
  • The artwork will be primarily chosen based on the artistic integrity and the quality of the aesthetic experience it offers. 

Selected artworks and the artists who created them will be unveiled at the Alberta Lottery Fund Art Gallery prior to a show at the Shell Theatre. 

Details and how to submit your work can be found here.

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Art pieces stolen from Campbell River charity – Campbell River Mirror

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Two pieces of art were taken from a Campbell River charity over the Victoria Day long weekend, and the Campbell River RCMP is looking for the public’s health to get them back.

A drum hand-painted by Greg Henderson was stolen, as was a framed print of a family of grizzly bears painted by Brent J. Smith.

At this point in time, said Const. Maury Tyre, we’re hoping that the thieves can redirect their moral compass, as the charity is really just trying to get its art back. The art can be returned no questions asked at this time, but if it comes down to the police completing the investigation and finding someone in possession of the missing pieces of art, charges could end up being sought for possession of property obtained by crime.

The art pieces can be returned to the Campbell River RCMP at their office at 275 S Dogwood Street, Campbell River.

If you have any information regarding the theft of the art pieces or their possible location, please contact the Campbell River RCMP at 250-286-6221.

READ ALSO: The Quadra Island Studio Tour is back

Buskers Day back for second year on the Seawalk



marc.kitteringham@campbellrivermirror.com

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ARTS AROUND: Spring-inspired art exhibit opens at Rollin Art Centre – Alberni Valley News

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MELISSA MARTIN

SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

A new exhibit at the Rollin Art Centre features 16 locals artists, each displaying their own creative renditions of the season of spring.

“SPRING – Seasonal Imagery” includes artists such as Janice Sheehan, Mae LaBlanc, Jim Sears, Joan Akerman, Jayant Chaudhary, Cathy Stewart, Cheryl Brennan, Cynthia Bonesky, Mary Ann McGrath, Cheryl Frehlich, Dodie Manifold, Patrick Larose, Phyllis Davenport, Judith Rackham, Susie Quinn and Karen Poirier.

The exhibit runs until June 18. Join us the gallery this Saturday, May 28 for refreshments and an opportunity to meet these talented artists.

WORKSHOPS

Two-Day Watercolour Workshop at Rollin Art Centre — June 1 and 2 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. — The Basics of Colour Theory & Pigments

Ionne McCauley is an accomplished artist, quilter, and author currently living in Qualicum Beach. Ionne has taught colour workshops for over 25 years. In this workshop you will learn about value, hue, tone, shade, and saturation. Explore the learnable magic of watercolour paints, how to achieve glowing colours and how to choose (and use) pigments for exciting colour combinations. Workshop fee is $150. Supply fee (to be paid to the instructor) is $20 and kit fee includes all paints used in class, paper to start and a grayscale. Register at Rollin Art Centre at 250-724-3412. Numbers are limited.

One-Day Acrylic Workshop at Rollin Art Centre — Saturday, July 16 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — Landscapes Made Easy

Susan Schaefer will guide you through this, discussing what makes a good composition while simplifying your landscape. Schaefer has been a professional artist for the past 20 years and has taken workshops from some of Canada’s finest artists. Workshop fee is $115 +GST. A supply list is available. Register at Rollin Art Centre at 250-724-3412. Numbers are limited.

LOOKING FOR ARTISTS

Our Annual Solstice Arts Festival is back!

After two years of hiatus due to COVID-19, we are back and ready to celebrate the arts. Join us Saturday, June 18 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Rollin Art Centre. Spaces are available on our terrace or in our two gardens for artists and artisans to set up a table or an easel or demos of the artwork you create.

If you are interested in displaying at this year’s free family event, call the Rollin Art Centre 250-724-3412 for more info. Spaces are $25 for the day.

SUMMER TEAS

Teas on the Terrace are back at the Rollin Art Centre and tickets are now on sale.

Tickets are $20 for our strawberry teas and $25 for a High Tea, served on a two-tiered plate. Join us on the terrace, under the canopy of the trees, sipping tea, listening to local musicians and sampling a selection of snacks.

The first event will be a Strawberry Tea on July 7 featuring the Folk Song Circle.

WHAT’S HAPPENING

June 1 and 2 – Workshop – “Watercolour – The Basics of Colour Theory and Pigments”

June 18 – Solstice Arts Festival – Spaces available for artisans

June 22 to July 22 – “Women’s Work” – group exhibit – Sue Thomas, Jillian Mayne, Colleen Clancy and Ann McIvor.

July and August – Teas on the Terrace – Tickets available now.

Melissa Martin is the Arts Administrator for the Community Arts Council, at the Rollin Art Centre and writes for the Alberni Valley News. Call 250-724-3412. Email: communityarts@shawcable.com.

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TRAMPS! looks at the art movement behind the The New Romantics – CBC.ca

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TRAMPS! (Game Theory Films)

Cutaways is a personal essay series where filmmakers tell the story of how their film was made. This is one of 5 essays from directors featured at the 2022 Inside Out 2SLGBTQ+ Film Festival

Rising from the nihilistic ashes of the punk movement in the late 1970s, a fresh crowd of flamboyant fashionistas, who would later be christened the New Romantics, began to materialize on the streets of London, England. 

My new feature film, TRAMPS! repositions the iconic 80s subculture as an art movement rather than solely a pop-cultural one.

This period in British history was particularly unique because kids could attend art or fashion school for free, and also lived in massive squatted houses with other fledgling artists. In a pre-AIDS era, this way of living provided a lifestyle with very little sense of consequence and resulted in a flourish of art being produced that straddled film, music, art and fashion causing waves around the world that resonate to this day. 

Their radical, proto-drag confused the media, who couldn’t look away — like a cultural car crash, and soon enough they were brought into homes internationally with the rocket-like rise-to-fame of the likes of Boy George and his band Culture Club.

TRAMPS! (Game Theory Films)

The idea for the film originates back to my trip to London, England with my first movie back in 2013. Admittedly, I came to the city with a well-developed obsession with UK music, arts and subculture going all the way back to my youth. I was struck by the proximity of these artists who were both central to my preexisting obsessions, and those who permeated the margins of the cultures I had come to love. 

I knew straight away that I needed to spend time getting under its skin for my next movie, and it wasn’t until a series of coincidences revealed to me what that movie would be, that things started falling into place.

As my research plunged to its depths I realized that I wanted to shift the focus away from megastars and instead shine a light on people like painter Trojan, who had to this point been thrust into the shadows of his partner in crime, performance artist Leigh Bowery. These shadows were also cast by the onslaught of AIDS and rampant drug use, which effectively banished so much of the creative community to obscurity. 

I crossed paths with incredible artists like fashion designers BodyMap, jewelry designer and stylist extraordinaire Judy Blame, choreographer Michael Clark and style icons Princess Julia and Scarlett Cannon. I was obsessed with their images, having permeated the pages of revolutionary cultural magazines like I-D and The Face, but seemed to flounder in terms of being celebrated as part of this movement which really was born out of a diversity of art practises, rather than strictly pop music aimed at straight people and dominant culture.

TRAMPS! (Game Theory Films)

For me, TRAMPS! is a movie about youth culture, the central characters just happen to be more advanced in their years. Of course, night life in London still thrives, and although they seem to be slipping away to the annals of the digitization of gay culture, the East End alternative gay bars still teem with boundary pushing queer artists and festive freaks. DJ’s like Princess Julia and Jeffrey Hinton are still very much at the centre of it. They’ve been at it since the early 80s — Jeffrey Hinton was the resident DJ at Leigh Bowery’s nightclub Taboo, which was infamously debaucherous. 

People like Julia and Jeffrey are a well of energy and I was eager to dip my bucket in! I wanted to bridge the gap between the archaic divide between so-called “kids these days” and the generations that predated them. I think the adage goes, if you’re not interested, you’re not interesting. The subjects in my film continue to engage with and produce art in whatever guise that may be — even just dressing up! 

Making a documentary can be pretty depleting, especially when you spend years chasing pennies from granting bodies. For me that also extended into a sense of unworthiness — like the project I cared so deeply for didn’t have the worth I felt it had. It can also be costly in many other ways, such as a forced unsustainable lifestyle, especially when other filmmakers seem to sail through things like financing and distribution, where I felt I was destined to flounder. 

That’s why when I would look at the subjects in TRAMPS! I began to see them not as just members of bygone subculture, but instead as a sort of mystical source of inspiration. To be an artist is to be a survivalist, resilience is at its centre, and so the narrative of the movie began to develop around those themes. Because I needed to hear it, I assumed others like me would also benefit from their secrets. What was the source of that resilience? How do they survive? How will I continue to make art and survive? 

TRAMPS! (Game Theory Films)

The New Romantics were essentially living what we are now seeing in what is sometimes referred to as the precariat generation; those whose income and employment are entirely insecure today. While working small jobs in friends shops, and a variety of other side gigs, trying to survive while making this movie — this fear-filled existence became central in my life and the narrative of the movie as well. Very dramatic I know, but these are undeniably dramatic times. 

I hoped the answer, and inspiration to continue down this path existed somewhere in their story.  This was the inspiration I needed to grow as a filmmaker and as a person, and so TRAMPS! was born.

I wanted to find some tenderness in a community that was so well-known for its aesthetic alone, and through this concept and cliché of the “artists struggle” I feel we really did find a lot of heart in that. It wasn’t until the movie was invited to play BFI Flare, and I stood on the stage at two sold out screenings that I realized that pursuit I so desperately needed to continue, truly did manifest in this documentary. I’m so excited to be able to share that with anyone and everyone who may continue to be in that position. 

Ultimately, TRAMPS! is an allegorical gesture to artists of any generation trying to navigate how to produce work in an aggressively capitalist political economy. It happens to take place in London, but I hope it speaks to artists everywhere.


TRAMPS! screens in Toronto at the Inside Out 2SLGBTQ+ Film Festival on Tuesday, May 31. It is available to stream across Ontario from May 26 to June 5.

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