Connect with us

Art

Tearmann Celebration of Art 2020 cancelled – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Published

 on


NEW GLASGOW, N.S. —

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Tearmann Society for Abused Women fundraising committee, along with the board of directors, have cancelled the 26th Annual Celebration of Art which was scheduled for May 1.

Donna Smith, executive director of Tearmann Society for Abused Women, said the event is one that people look forward to each year and offered her gratitude to the artists who donate their artwork annually.

The event has been postponed for a year until May 7, 2021 at the Museum of Industry in Stellarton.

“We look forward to a bigger and better event next year.”

While the event is a major fundraiser for the non-profit, Smith said their organization has received financial support to assist during the pandemic including funding from the Atlantic Compassion Fund through the United Way of Pictou County.

“Our priority is to meet the needs of women and children while maintaining social distancing and safety for staff and residents,” she said. “We are here to help and appreciate the support of our community and partnering organizations.”

The Tearmann Society continues to offer services to women and children experiencing abuse.

“Our shelter is open and our crisis line is available 24/7,” Smith said. “There is always someone there to take your call.”

Tearmann’s 24-Hour Crisis Line is 902-752-0132 or 1-888-831-0330.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Japanese art show seeks submissions from young local artists – Sooke News Mirror

Published

 on


Young local artists have a chance to present their work in Japan.

The Hamada Children’s Museum of Art in Japan seeks visual arts submissions from artists 5 to 15-years-old living between Sooke and Port Renfrew. There is no cost to enter.

The student art will be featured in the 2021 Independents Show in Hamada.

The museum will choose only a select number of pieces from Canada. If successful, original art will be on display and remain permanent at the Hamada Children’s Museum in Japan.

The winning artists will also receive a certificate of participation and their work featured online during the 24th Annual Independents Global Exhibition on Jan. 16.

The deadline for submissions is Dec. 10. For more information, please contact Diane Moran by email at moraninthemoon@gmail.com.

ALSO READ: Sooke Fine Art Show moves online due to COVID-19 pandemic



editor@sookenewsmirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Language and art: new semiannual online program launches at the Ellen Art Gallery – Concordia University News

Published

 on


The Ellen Art Gallery recently launched a new semi-annual, online program. Each instalment of Terms will investigate the manifold meanings of a given word. The program is tripartite, featuring three components.

For the first component, the selected term will be explored in a short essay by a researcher working outside of the visual arts. He or she will examine the term through a particular lens, reflecting on the nuances, ambiguities, and plural meanings of the term.

For the second component, Gallery curator of research and program leader Julia Eilers Smith will pair the term with an existing artwork.

In the final component, a writer from the cultural sector will produce another short essay. Using the artwork as a point of departure, and drawing on the first essay, the writer will further explore various dimensions of the term and its significances.

Each term will be twice presented in this tripartite form — twice in the given year — before another term is selected for the following year.

Terms investigates how various, polysemic meanings are sedimented in words, how terms are disseminated, and how they alter public discourse.

Vulnerability

The first edition of Terms explores the term Vulnerability.

Writer, researcher, community organizer, and activist Mostafa Henaway explores the term ‘vulnerability’ in relation to his work with migrants.

“If there is a term,” he writes, “that evokes a spirit of our moment, it is ‘vulnerability.’”

Henaway depicts our ambivalent notions of vulnerability. The term can sometimes evoke empathy for migrants that are struggling. But ‘vulnerability’ is sometimes considered in terms of the apparent ‘natural’ limits of a person or organism. We see vulnerability as a person’s natural susceptibility to inevitable assaults from the outside.

Henaway makes a case for other conceptions of vulnerability that allow it to be understood as something largely created through our own constructed political, economic, and social world.

He uses this notion of created “structural vulnerability,” exploring how various policies create adverse and exploitive conditions for migrant workers.

Henaway’s essay is followed in the program by a short 1960s film by Canadian artist Joyce Wieland, Hand Tinting.

Arts writer Yaniya Lee develops the exploration of vulnerability through a reflection on the film.

Forming a continuity with the theme of labour, the film is comprised of leftover footage produced by Wieland when she worked at a youth employment training center. The center aimed to teach employable skills to disadvantaged youth.

“Wieland’s task,” explains Lee, “was to film cutaways of the participants during downtime, allowing the recruitment documentary to show the centre’s atmosphere.”

When the company rejected Wieland’s documentary, she made her own film using some of the footage. The film is hand-tinted and perforated in places with a sewing needle.

In her own account of the experience, Lee writes, Wieland was moved by the somewhat pitiful circumstances of the young, mostly black women, while also inspired by their courage and willingness to invest in themselves.

Lee uses the film to reflect on the use of vulnerable subjects as the ‘content’ of film and works of art.

“Wieland ‘got’ the footage to make this film from a paid job; the girls she filmed were at a training centre seeking new opportunities,” Lee points out. “What does it mean to use other people’s bodies as matter” for a work of art?

Lee expresses her mix of admiration and distrust for Wieland’s work, wondering whether Wieland has advocated for vulnerable women or whether she has exploited them.

Lee concludes with a reflection on the relation between subject and work, this time questioning her own vulnerability as the writer making a subject of Wieland’s art.

The second posting of Terms will be launched in late January, 2021, examining vulnerability from another viewpoint.


Find out more about the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery at Concordia.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

After languishing for decades, an important piece of Acadian art gets a new lease on life – CBC.ca

Published

 on


For more than 40 years, an important piece of Acadian art languished in the basement of Louis-J-Robichaud High School in Shediac.

The theatre curtain, measuring three metres by 5½ metres, depicts a scene from the deportation of the Acadians in the mid-18th century.

Commissioned in 1931, the canvas was painted by Acadian artist Edouard Gautreau.

The curtain hung in the Shemogue parish theatre hall until the 1960s, when the hall fell into disrepair, but the work of art was spared.

Over the years, the canvas became increasingly damaged until it was rescued by the late Father Maurice Léger in 1979 and put in the care of the Société Historique de la Mer Rouge.

It sat in the high school basement for decades, before ownership was transferred to the Nation Prospère Acadie charity in May 2020, with the promise of restoration.

Daniel LeBlanc says as more dirt and mould is removed, the true colours and details of the painting are being revealed. (Kate Letterick/CBC News)

“When we first unveiled it here when it was brought here a lot of us thought “Oh my goodness, this is so damaged, what can we do with this?” said Daniel LeBlanc, the organization’s executive director.

“But the work began and suddenly we started to see colours appear, very beautiful colours, and I think we got the sense that this could be restored to a very high-quality painting.”

A grant of $7,500 from the Sheila Hugh Mackay Foundation helped get the restoration work started.

Over the summer, the canvas got its first treatment, which removed dirt and consolidated some of the missing sections.  It had been ripped in half in the 1970s.

It was also put on display, at the Musée de Kent in Bouctouche, for the first time in a half a century.

Pictures show the condition of a corner of the canvas before the restoration work began, and after some special cleaning was done. (Kate Letterick/CBC CNews)

“Throughout the painting we see sections which were lost unfortunately with deterioration over time,” LeBlanc said. “There was a lot of filth and mould over it and so the work of the restoration expert was to prepare it so that it could be saved for future restoration work and also to expose it so that the public could see.”  

It will soon be taken down and rested on a flat surface for the winter, stabilizing it so it doesn’t have any stress on the threads of the painting. Then it will be ready for the next stage of restoration.

After languishing in a high school basement for more than 40 years, a piece of Acadian art is brought back to life. 3:03

“Painstakingly all the sections of the painting which have more filth on it, even mould, need to be cleaned thoroughly and the sections finally need to be patched in with paint,” LeBlanc said.

A specialist will match colours and repaint some of the damaged sections so it can finally be completed. A canvas will be needed underneath to keep everything supported.

Some of the pieces of the canvas are missing, after years of deterioration. (Kate Letterick/CBC News )

The final stage will be to frame the piece and have it permanently displayed.

LeBlanc said this was one of artist Edouard Gautreau’s largest works of art.

Born in Saint-Paul-de-Kent in 1906, Gautreau started painting at a young age, and he painted many large pieces in New Brunswick churches. LeBlanc said that unfortunately, many of those pieces were lost in fires.

LeBlanc said this canvas is special.

“Gautreau was very skilled in copying paintings but also bringing his own intuition and colours on paintings, so this is quite a much improved version of the small picture that you find in the Evangeline book,” he said.

LeBlanc said the first phase of restoration cost about $15,000, but the next phase will be more costly, at more than $75,000.

The large theatre curtain canvas was displayed this summer at the Musée de Kent in Bouctouche, for the first time in a half a century. (Kate Letterick/CBC News)

LeBlanc is still working on raising the funds, but hopes the restoration work can begin again next summer. He’d like to see it completed by late 2021 or in 2022.

LeBlanc said the canvas has had a long journey, one he’ll be happy to see completed.

“We went from discouragement to hope that we can actually complete this project and it can be a beautiful project for Acadia.” 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending