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The first HarmonyOS-powered phone from Huawei to arrive in 2021

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1089714

Anonymous, 1 hour agoI call BS… If App Gallery is so survivable, which is not, as you still need to sideload apps… moreIn my country there is apps for every bank, and every app can be installed. Give support to players like Huawei, just to break monopol.

J17346

In 2 years (thats the time i have to change my phones), my second phone will be huawei. Been itching for the nova 7 but i want to try their new os.
Im not really a geek, but its good to try the newos competitor.

A1707376

Jolla, 1 hour agoFood for thought – You mentioned PRISM, Boundless informant etc, all systems that the US uses…. moreAll systems are opaque whether democracy or dictatorship. In democracy they make noise once alternative spying becomes available in dictatorship you always under unknown situation. Certainly democracy in paper is good but Chinna had progressed soo far under dictatorship. May be this is time they get some relaxation.

A1707376

RR, 4 hours agoMicrosoft was even bigger then Huawei at the time when they tried to create their own OS and w… moreTo be fair Microsoft quickly gave up and never attempted to gain control over mobile OS market! It seems like a deliberate strategy to tank Nokia and also Ballmer strategy did not work and Sathya Nadella was more a software & service (Cloud) centric person. I used their Lumina 950XL which was a great mobile with great display, camera etc… getting App developers was not a difficult than today with the consolidated position. Nokia didn’t have the advanced tech patents like Huawei for it to survive the hardware game where China is ahead many many years with their expertise manufacturing for Western markets.

L63941452

Nice lets see how it compares to Android

A1707376

Mr A, 4 hours agoI am only interested if it’s purely new OS. no relation with android.
You stole my words! Just look at my other comment

A1707376

Anonymous, 5 hours agowho will buy that instead of android & ios ?!!!It is enough for Huawei if Chuna alone buys

A1707376

This is very much needed, hope they are not offshoot of Android fork. It must have is own Kernal and its own home grown subsystems. Hope it is

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  • Anonymous
  • 8js
  • 1 hour ago

Anonymous, 2 hours agoShow me believable articles or instances where Huawei is spying in other countries. Tip: you c… moreAh… Typical China politics… You can’t prove it, it didn’t happen. Huawei does a pretty PR job, few articles has being silent and pull off overnight, as well, it also a common tactic for them to pay to get away things. Nevermind if backdoor in Hawei exist or not, they simply retrieve data as they please. And it part of the country’s legislation, if the government want, they have to comply, no question ask. You got to be pretty naive too think it only for domestic population. If you want a scenario: https://www.politico.eu/article/huawei-germany-court-case-privacy/

All countries, vendors collect data. But with China, it zero transparency, zero possibilities of action with no lines of border.

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  • Anonymous
  • 8js
  • 1 hour ago

Alex 94, 2 hours agoAs a European I will use that App gallery all day. Every app can be installed in 5 min.I call BS… If App Gallery is so survivable, which is not, as you still need to sideload apps like Facebook, Google, Whatsapp, etc. Not to mention it almost (actually zero that I see) contain no local apps (banks, municipality, etc). Huawei re-release the P30 with Android GMS (last handset that Huawei still have license agreement) in Europe for a reason, if Huawei App is so hot, they wouldn’t need to do that.

Personally I love how some pretend they live in the US / EU, which clearly, they don’t.

v2975596

We all need a Harmony, not bans. Not sure if it will be better than android though, we need OS independent from any country for it to work forever…

d173

trapper09, 4 hours agoThis is the end for HuaweiI hope so. It should also be named as ConflictOS instead. The words Harmony and China don’t go along well.

J

  • Jolla
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  • 1 hour ago

Anonymous, 2 hours agoShow me believable articles or instances where Huawei is spying in other countries. Tip: you c… moreFood for thought – You mentioned PRISM, Boundless informant etc, all systems that the US uses..its common knowlege for security enthusiasts now…but what about China, they don’t spy on anyone ? Everyone spys on everyone..In the US, democracy allows them to atleast know about this stuff gradually & deal with it. China is so opaque – you won’t even be able to find out what systems they use to spy & do things like X!ji@ng- then you have the guts to call the Chinese way better than other Western countries..

1089714

Boggy-Stefy, 2 hours agoThere is still long way to go. I actually wanted to buy the P40 Lite some time ago, but after … moreAs a European I will use that App gallery all day. Every app can be installed in 5 min.

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  • Anonymous
  • sxr
  • 2 hours ago

I’m really regretting buying their Nova 3i. Just a few days after it was released, they’d then released their better phone at almost the same price, Honor Play. After some short few months, I decided to sell this but no one buys it anymore since they cut the price largely just after some few weeks.

Now I’m currently stuck with this phone and has been really pissed because they’re too persistent on pushing their annoying AppGallery and other updates every now and then

Will never buy again from this brand. They release phones like weekly and their prices devaluate very quickly. So far, this has been my greatest buyer’s remorse.

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  • Anonymous
  • 7Xc
  • 2 hours ago

Boggy-Stefy, 3 hours agoLol.
Everyone is spying on you one way or another. As long as you have internet and account/… more
Show me believable articles or instances where Huawei is spying in other countries. Tip: you can’t. All you get is their social credit system and their firewall, both of which are meant for Chinese residents only. Nothing about Huawei, just some claims that they use their equipment to spy on people. Guess who made these claims? You guessed it, our butthurt friends the americans.
Now, show me believable articles or instances where any american company is spying or taking part in spying in other countries. You get Google/Apple/Netflix/Microsoft/Facebook/literally every major american company being known to collect and sell user data, PRISM – a global surveillance program by the NSA, Boundless Informant – yet another global surveillance program by the NSA, XKEYSCORE – oh look at that what do you know it’s only another global surveillance program by our good-natured oh-so-honest folks at the NSA. Oh, and let’s not forget all of the leaks provided to us by Snowden, who has somehow become conveniently forgotten by american citizens. Still the list goes on.

Now tell me that american companies are the “good” ones. If you’re a good little american who has never travelled abroad, what can China do with your personal data? Make fake profiles on websites you’d never use, using your name? Conduct illegal business offline using your name? The airlines would have proof you’ve never flown abroad. Your own government’s vast information about you would also know that you’ve never flown abroad.

B1617358

Yesssss… Finally 💢💪🏻
I waited for this, since the first time we heard about it.
I have NO problem at all saying goodbye to US Android, even im living in Denmark.

And ofc other Chinese over time will follow and support Harmony if it good. No Chinese firm will no lo ger trust the hypocrite US government anymore, like many other countries the last couple of years.

Some of the best flagship with a 3rd OS sooo nice, finally something new.
Would never go back to Apple again, been there done that. But i craving for something new, feel Android is same same and it is ofc, but mostly we see minor boring updates.

Some talk about Microsoft and their OS adventure, but times are different now and theres a huge opposition vs US, also outside China. So it wil get lots of support, from EU to for sure.

It’s a great day 😃🤗

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  • Anonymous
  • ter
  • 2 hours ago

Boggy-Stefy, 3 hours agoDo not be so hyped about this, just wait and see.
I liked very much Windows phones back in t… more
It is same as those many Chinese companies’ origin. Those will be success because of Chinese market which happens to be the largest. Including smartphone market

B

  • Boggy-Stefy
  • p%B
  • 2 hours ago

Alex 94, 3 hours agoThey already create App galery, which contain many popular aps. More than a million developers… moreThere is still long way to go. I actually wanted to buy the P40 Lite some time ago, but after seeing some reviews on internet about how many workarounds you need to do, I said no way.
The average person doesn’t want to do workarounds on their phones. They want to buy the phone, put the sim in and start using it.

For example, for me an European, I do not want to enter on their app store and start seeing all this Chinese apps or all that Chinese language in there. I want to look on a Samsung or Sony phone and then on a Huawei phone and be able to have the same apps instantly. If this will not happen, no way I am buying a Huawei phone.

B

  • Boggy-Stefy
  • p%B
  • 3 hours ago

kiasunkiasi, 3 hours agolooking forward to try it out as a backup phone… if it’s good, then bye bye to spying G… moreLol.
Everyone is spying on you one way or another. As long as you have internet and account/accounts your personal data is long gone.
No matter Huawei, Google, Apple, they are all in the same boat. Just the fanboy-ism mentality will make people trust one or other. But, in the end they are collecting your data.
Of course, some companies spy on you more than others. But thinking that Huawei is one of the good companies, well..good luck with that. lol.

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Ring’s Traffic Stop feature is about bringing more accountability to policing – The Verge

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On Thursday, Ring, the home security subsidiary of Amazon, released a new dashcam embedded with a novel feature called “Traffic Stop” that could help bring more accountability to policing. That could be a powerful thing, especially as tens of millions of people have poured onto the streets in cities across the country to demonstrate against systemic racism, white supremacy, and police brutality. It could also be a privacy nightmare.

The Ring Car Cam, which will cost $199, has two cameras: one pointed out the front windshield and one that points toward the car’s interior. The camera can send alerts whenever an event such as a break-in, towing, or accident is detected, and owners can tap into the cameras’ feeds to see what’s happening. The Car Cam relies on either Wi-Fi or LTE for connectivity.

But the most interesting feature is Traffic Stop. All a driver needs to do is say “Alexa, I’m being pulled over” to trigger the cameras to start recording and save their footage to the cloud. At the same time, a notification will be sent to a list of emergency contacts specified by the user during initial setup, informing them of the traffic stop.

Essentially, what Ring has created is a tool for “traffic stop counter-surveillance,” said Elizabeth Joh, a professor of law at UC-Davis and an expert on policing, technology, and surveillance.

“In policing, technology is all about power,” Joh told The Verge. “Redistributing that power can be an important means of police accountability.”

There’s nothing particularly new about using dashcams as a means of recording traffic stops, but the novelty of Ring’s Traffic Stop feature is that it automates the process, Joh said.

“We’ve always been able to pull out our phones… and try to record it,” she said. “But by embedding it in the landscape of our cars, by simply just saying ‘I’ve been pulled over,’ makes that recording much more likely.”

That’s especially meaningful when you consider that police body cameras can be unreliable, hard to obtain, or subjective in what they capture. “Easily recording a traffic stop from a driver’s perspective is going to be able, in theory, to give us an important part of what’s happening in these encounters that sometimes go badly wrong,” Joh added.

And if people are willing to share the footage from their traffic stop with academic researchers, that can be incredibly useful for better understanding excessive force and police violence during traffic stops.

But there are also privacy implications. After all, it’s a camera that sits on your dashboard and sends video, audio, and perhaps GPS information to the cloud. Passengers in vehicles equipped with the Ring Car Cam may not be able to consent to being filmed before the device starts recording. And Ring as a company has been criticized for sharing data with police departments without informing their customers.

“What if the prompt is used for bad purposes?” Joh asks. “Say you’re not actually being pulled over or someone just wants to record you. And if the traffic stop video has embarrassing information, it’s in the cloud.”

She added, “There are good questions about who has access to that information. And I’m not just talking about the police, but somebody who works at Ring. Do they just get to watch it?” (A spokesperson for the company did not respond to a request for comment.)

Ring has said the most important thing about the Car Cam is access to the footage. While many dashcams include a removable SD card, Ring’s camera automatically uploads the footage to the cloud, giving customers more immediate access to what was recorded.

“The most important thing in these situations is to make sure that you have the video and so we’ll be streaming the video from the Car Cam to the cloud in real time,” Ring’s head of mobile products, Nathan Ackerman, told CNET.

As for who else should have access to that footage, Ring is still working through those questions. “We’re working through some of the ins and outs of exactly when the [emergency contacts] get notified, whether they can jump in and view the live stream or if it’ll be available after the fact,” Ackerman said.

These will be important questions for Ring to answer, especially if it hopes to win over people who are aware of the company’s controversial partnerships with police departments.

“I think for privacy-minded and civil liberties-minded consumers, they’re going to be really skeptical about whether or not Ring has some other purpose or agenda in mind in making this video capturing really easy,” Joh said. “But maybe that’s beside the point, because if Ring doesn’t do it, I think it was inevitable that another technology company was going to do it.”

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The 4 reasons Ring thinks you’ll trust its flying camera

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At first glance, it’s a tough ask: allow Amazon-owned Ring to fly a mini drone carrying a camera around your house, all in the name of security. Ring Always Home Cam was undoubtedly the weirdest of the announcements at yesterday’s big Amazon Fall hardware event, but while it may seem like an Onion gag the security firm insists it’s headed to your living room in 2021.

Reactions were, as you could probably expect, mixed. Some people instantly loved the idea of a camera that wasn’t limited to the traditional pan, tilt, and zoom we’re familiar with from existing security systems, instead being able to move the lens to where it’s actually needed.

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Others, though, weren’t so convinced. After all, the prospect of an extension of Amazon’s AI taking flight around your home requires a fair degree of trust, and there are plenty of people who aren’t all that comfortable at the thought of cohabiting with a fixed connected camera. Ask Ring, though, and there are four good reasons why you shouldn’t’ be worried about Ring Always Home Cam.

You tell Ring Always Home Cam where to fly

Although we’ve seen drones get increasingly smart, and develop autopilot systems, Ring’s flying camera errs on the dumber side – and that’s by design. Although it has features like obstacle avoidance, to stop it from colliding with unexpected objects, the actual flight plan is all preset. Indeed, you set that up when you first take the Ring Always Home Cam out of the box.

Each flight path is established from day one. So, if you don’t want the camera to go into your bathroom or bedroom, you can make sure they’re off-limits.

You’ll always hear Ring Always Home Cam coming

If you do find yourself in a room where the flying camera can roam, you shouldn’t ever be surprised by it. “We even designed Always Home Cam to hum at a certain volume,” Ring explains, “so it’s clear the camera is in motion and is recording. This is privacy you can hear.”

Drones generally aren’t quiet things when in operation: after all, having multiple rotors, even little ones, make some noise. If anything, the flying camera is undoubtedly more easily spotted when it’s in action compared to a traditional, fixed camera. They usually only have an LED to show they’re active.

Ring Always Home Cam can’t be piloted manually

Should the flying camera spot something while you’re not home, you’ll be notified in the Ring app. What you can’t do, however, is log in remotely and pilot the Ring Always Home Cam using manual controls. Unlike a traditional remote-control drone, there’s no way to manually operate it.

Again, that’s by design. “It cannot be manually controlled,” Ring points out, “ensuring that it will only record and see what is important to you.” Of course, that also means that you’ll want to think carefully about where you do set up the preset flight paths, since the camera won’t be able to stray from those areas.

When Ring Always Home Cam lands, it’s blind

Adding to the “you’ll always know when it’s recording” reassurance is the nature of the drone camera’s dock. When the Ring Always Home Cam lands, the camera isn’t just switched off, it’s fully enclosed. “The device rests in the base and the camera is physically blocked when docked,” Ring explains. “The camera will only start recording when the device leaves the base and starts flying via one of the preset paths.”

Even if someone could hack it to turn on while it was landed, all they’d be able to see would be the dark insides of the docking station itself. To change that, it would have to take off, and then you’d hear it. Plus, Ring is delivering end-to-end encryption later this year to further minimize the potential for unwanted app intruders.

Clearly, there’s still some way to go before the idea of a $250 flying security camera is palatable to everyone. As ideas go, however, Ring’s design is a little less creepy than it might first sound. Whether that will translate to actual sales when the Ring Always Home Cam takes flight next year remains to be seen.

Source:- SlashGear

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Ring's Flying In-Home Camera Drone Escalates Privacy Worries – Threatpost

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Privacy fears are blasting off after Amazon’s Ring division unveiled the new Always Home Cam, a smart home security camera drone.

Ring’s newly announced robot drone – a connected device that flies around homes taking security footage – is causing privacy experts’ concerns to take off.

Amazon on Thursday unveiled the Always Home Cam as part of its Ring division, which will cost $249.99 and starts shipping next year. The autonomous indoor security camera can fly around in the home on paths that are pre-approved by users, allowing them to check to see if they left a window open or forgot to turn the stove off – or to check to make sure robbers aren’t breaking in.

However, the new device has also sparked a firestorm of privacy concerns on Twitter about how Ring – whose connected doorbells have already created plenty of privacy controversies – will collect, use and share the collected data.

“For privacy advocates, the concept of an untethered IoT [Internet of Things] device surveilling the house is disturbing,” Rick Holland, CISO and vice president of strategy at Digital Shadows, told Theatpost. “Coupled with Ring’s controversial privacy practices, the adoption of the drone could be low. However, those that have already embraced the concept of in-house security cameras are likely to be excited. The prospect of having a single drone monitor your house instead of multiple individual cameras could be alluring.”

Privacy Concerns

Ring for its part said that it has built privacy features into the physical design of the Always Home Cam. When the drone is docked in its charging base, the camera is physically blocked. The device has also been designed to hum at a certain volume, so it’s clear that the camera is in motion and recording, said Ring.

But Emma Bickerstaffe, senior research analyst at the Information Security Forum, told Threatpost that Ring needs to better address how it’s securing and using the sensitive personal data that’s being collected. If sold to advertisers, for instance, this type of data could allow companies to track individuals’ daily life, habits and preferences, and use this information for commercial gain, she said.

“Smart home devices, such as Ring, collect an inordinate amount of sensitive personal data in real time – this is typically transmitted to a cloud service for processing,” she said. “A critical question is, who has access to the data collected by the device, and whether it is processed and stored in a lawful manner that protects personal data from unauthorized use.”

For users who do opt for the security drone, the proper configuration will be critical to minimize security and privacy risks as much as possible, Holland urged.

“Consumers must enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) and automatic software updates to ensure that any vulnerabilities are quickly resolved,” he said.

Ring Privacy Efforts

During its Thursday product launch, Ring highlighted several privacy and security steps it is taking. For one, it said it aims to make end-to-end encryption easier for connected-home device users to control, saying that later this year, users will be able turn on end-to-end encryption for video from their Control Center.

“Privacy, security and user control are foundational to us at Ring,” said the company in a press statement. “Launching today in the Control Center, Video Encryption Controls let you learn more about how we currently encrypt and protect your videos.”

The changes come after media reports shed light on serious security holes in the Ring connected doorbells. For instance, Ring owners aren’t notified of suspicious login alerts when devices are accessed on various IP addresses — and there are seemingly no limitations for incorrect login attempts. Ring has addressed these issues by mandating two-factor authentication (2FA) security measures.

Ring is also allowing doorbell users to completely disable its “Neighbors” service, a controversial feature that allows Ring owners to share video footage captured from their cameras with law enforcement. The app has raised worries about racial bias, surveillance and privacy.

Smart-Home Privacy Problems

IoT devices – many of which have security measures described as a “ticking time bomb” by researchers – are dramatically increasing in homes, which could potentially open the literal door to private and sensitive user data.

Researchers have previously discovered several deep-rooted issues that exist around connected devices: Earlier in 2020, researchers found that at the most basic level, 98 percent of all IoT device traffic is unencrypted, exposing personal and confidential data on the network.

Several smart home devices have been found to have specific security holes. In August, researchers disclosed vulnerabilities in Amazon’s Alexa virtual assistant platform that could have allowed attackers to access users’ personal information, like home addresses – simply by persuading them to click on a malicious link. Also in August, researchers urged connected-device manufacturers to ensure they have applied patches addressing a flaw in a module used by millions of IoT devices.

These security fears are exacerbated now that much of the world is working from home due to the pandemic, Bickerstaffe said. Cybercriminals are looking to smart home devices as a way to access and compromise valuable business information on the same network.

With this in mind, “close attention should be paid to the security controls adopted by Ring,” Bickerstaffe told Threatpost. “Cybercriminals are already maximizing the opportunity to exploit vulnerabilities in smart home devices as a stepping stone to target the network on which these devices are installed.”

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