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The latest green investment tool? Short-selling the fossil fuel economy – Corporate Knights Magazine

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Capitalism gets a rough ride from many climate crusaders, who say it encourages reckless growth and undervalues the benefits of a clean, safe environment. But capital is just a tool, and increasingly it’s being used to support pro-planet policies.

The new tool of green investing is short selling – a tactic in which investors hope to profit from declining stock prices.

Selling short exposes investors to sky-high risk: your target security could theoretically double or triple in price before you buy it back. But selling short can produce big profits in a down market – and may even change the behaviour of the company you’ve targeted.

As green investors seek out ever-higher returns, they’re not just buying stocks of “green” companies involved in sustainable activities or renewable energy. They’re selling big-carbon companies short, confident that those companies’ unsustainable practices will appeal to diminishing numbers of customers and investors.

It’s a game anyone can play. If you’d sold stock in Canada’s second-largest oil producer, Imperial Oil, on Dec. 1, 2018, and then bought the shares back a year later, you’d have paid $33.15 for a stock you’d previously sold for $39.57 – giving you a profit of $6.42 a share, or nearly 20%. Even better, if you’d played the same game with Husky Energy, you’d have made a profit of 72%, as the stock plunged from $16.50 to $9.58.

Since 2012, the number of sustainability-focused investment funds launched in Europe has tripled, to more than 300 funds holding US$30.7 trillion in assets. As the industry grows, traders search harder for good deals, compelling many to focus on the short side. One money manager running a new US$25-million fund at Trium Capital told Bloomberg, “There are a lot fewer companies that have good solutions than don’t. There are plenty of companies out there that we think could be interesting on the short side.”

BNP Paribas plans a similar strategy in its new Environmental Absolute Return Thematic Fund. It will short companies with “unsustainable or technologically inferior business models vulnerable to transition risk.”

Australia’s Morphic Asset Management runs an ESG (environmental, social and governance) fund that excludes investment in companies involved in environmental destruction – but it allows its managers to bet against them.

Many green investors hope their shorting will serve as a warning to companies to take the green economy more seriously. This pressure will only grow, as 35% of hedge funds now consider ESG factors in making investment decisions.

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China proposes rules to regulate private pension investment via mutual funds – Reuters.com

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A Chinese national flag flutters near the building of China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) at the Financial Street area in Beijing, China July 16, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang/Files

SHANGHAI, June 25 (Reuters) – China’s securities regulator proposed rules to regulate private pension investment via mutual funds, setting the criteria for qualified products and sales agents under a scheme that will channel fresh savings into the country’s capital markets.

The draft rules, published by the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) late on Friday, came after Beijing in April launched a milestone private pension scheme to tackle challenges of aging population. read more

Under the scheme, eligible Chinese citizens can buy mutual funds, savings deposits and insurance products via their own individual pension accounts, potentially boosting a pension market that has lured foreign asset managers including Fidelity International and BlackRock.

The proposed rules “have set a relatively high bar for products and institutions, and are designed to ensure safety of pension fund investment and protect investors’ interest,” the CSRC said in a statement on its website.

Initially, pension target funds with at least 50 million yuan ($7.48 million) of assets over the past four quarters are eligible under the pilot pension scheme, the CSRC said.

Other types of retail funds with clear investment strategies and good long-term track records will be gradually added to the eligibility list as the scheme expands, the CSRC said.

Currently, there are 91 pension target funds that meet the CSRC’s criteria, according to TF Securities.

In addition, fund managers and sales agents participating in private pension business must set up internal control systems, adopt long-term incentives, and ensure independent operation of the pension assets, according to the rules.

Independent consultancies estimate China’s private pension market will grow to at least $1.7 trillion by 2025, from $300 billion currently.

In 20 years, 28% of China’s population will be more than 60 years old, up from 10% today, making it one of the most rapidly-aging populations in the world, according to the World Health Organization.

($1 = 6.6878 Chinese yuan renminbi)

Reporting by Samuel Shen and Brenda Goh
Editing by Nick Zieminski

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Not gold or bank FD, Jefferies finds this asset as top investment by Indians | Mint – Mint

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Amid soaring inflation and slowdown worries, investors are busy finding out save haven for their money. While some are batting in favour of gold, some investors are favouring debt instruments for short term like bank fixed deposits (FDs) and other deposits. But, if we go by the Jefferies findings, around half of the Indian household savings in March 2022 has been invested in real estate properties whereas bank deposits and gold are distant second and third most preferred asset investment options among Indian households.

As per the Jefferies findings, out of $ 10.7 trillion Indian households assets in March 2022, whopping 49.4 per cent have been invested in real estate properties whereas 15.10 per cent went to band deposits 15 per cent of the Indian households savings were invested in gold. Impact of Covid-19 pandemic was also visible in this Jefferies report as Indian households invested 6.20 per cent of their net savings in insurance funds and it was fourth most preferred investment option by Indians.

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Photo: Courtesy Jefferies

Provident funds and pension is at 5th spot after receiving 5.70 per cent of $10.70 trillion Indian households savings in March 2022. Despite heavy FIIs selling at Indian equity markets, DIIs have remained net buyers since October 2021. However, in Jefferies report, equities has received 4.80 per cent of the net Indian households savings in March 2022 and it is 6th most preferred investment option among Indians. As Indian households has a habit of keeping some part of its savings in liquid form. 

Jefferies report has a mention about it as well. As per the Jefferies findings, 3.50 per cent of the net Indian households savings in this period has gone to cash or liquid segment and it an obvious least preferred option among the Indian households.

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HomeFirst Home Healthcare secures investment from Fulcrum – PE Hub

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Harpeth Ventures also participated in the investment.




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