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Tiny billboards promote tiny art show in Halifax – Global News

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An art gallery is hoping to draw Haligonians into its annual tiny art show with a new strategy: tiny billboards.

The Argyle Fine Art gallery, located on Barrington Street, launched its 2021 Pre-Shrunk Art Show on Jan. 29, but because of the COVID-19 pandemic, visitation has been down.

“During the pandemic, there’s been a lot of ups and downs,” says Adriana Afford, owner of Argyle Fine Art.

She says visitation at the gallery has depended on case numbers on Halifax, but generally has reduced this year compared to previous years.

However, Afford says the gallery has had an opportunity to reach a wider audience online.






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Celebrating the Art of “Small”


Celebrating the Art of “Small” – Jan 27, 2021

The Pre-Shrunk Art Show is one of the Argyle’s most popular events. In a normal year, the gallery would see a line of visitors waiting to get in nearly every night of the show.

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“This year, more and more people are experiencing to show from the comforts of their home,” Afford said.

By partnering with local marketing agency Wunder for the tiny campaign, Afford hopes to see more support for the artists in the Pre-Shrunk show.


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This is the 17th year of the show, and it now features over 300 art pieces — all four by five inches small. Each piece sells for $175, no matter who the artist is.

“It’s a way for people to start owning and appreciating original artwork from artists all across Canada.”

This year the gallery’s jury looked through more than 900 tiny art pieces and selected 317 to showcase.

“What we have found this year was, it was a lot of wildlife. I think it has a lot to do with people maybe being outdoors during the pandemic a lot more,” Afford said.

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“We have a lot of frogs, fish, tons of birds; it could almost be called the bird show.”

Read more:
‘This is a huge loss’ — Director of Craft N.S. says 60% of crafters seeing drop in sales

Now, that tiny art has tiny ads to go with it.

On Tuesday, the gallery and Wunder placed dozens of tiny billboards and posters in downtown Halifax to attract visitors.

“It’s a playful campaign… but it’s also a way to remind people that we’re here and that they can come in,” said Afford.


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“Although it does work fairly well in an online platform,” Afford said, “I don’t think there’s too many people would disagree that seeing art in person — there’s nothing better than that.

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“(If) they see these fun little teeny tiny billboards and posters and everything, it might intrigue them and they might be more inclined to come in.”

Read more:
North Preston singer launches new book dedicated to empowering BIPOC kids

For those who are not comfortable going in just yet, the Pre-Shrunk Art Show can be viewed virtually here, or in VR here.

The Pre-Shrunk Art Show is on until Feb. 20.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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New art installation illuminates downtown Vancouver (PHOTOS/VIDEOS) | Curated – Daily Hive

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Please note: As recommended by BC’s provincial health officials, gatherings of any kind and unessential travel in the province is not recommended at this time. Please adhere to COVID-19 health and safety measures, including proper physical distancing and frequent hand washing, and wearing a mask or face-covering in public indoor and retail spaces. If you are sick, please stay home. 


A new art installation is lighting up downtown Vancouver in an effort to lift the city’s spirits.

Called BRIGHT Downtown, photos from the show’s inaugural night show bold animations dancing across the façade of the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver.

Put on by the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association (DVBIA), the show explores “how art is intrinsically interwoven into every step of the human experience.”

The free instillation will run nightly until March 12, and can be seen from “šxʷƛ̓ənəq Xwtl’e7énk Square,” also known as the North Plaza of the Vancouver Art Gallery.

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Art gallery launches #myessential community mural project – Woodstock Sentinel Review

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What is essential to you?

Answers to this question by local youth – in the form of drawings and photographs – will guide a #myessential community mural project that will be created by Durham artist JP Morel inside Owen Sound’s Tom Thomson Art Gallery.

“We’ve really only been using this word ‘essential’ because we’re hearing about it in news and such and we’ve been told what’s been essential during this global pandemic,” said Heather McLeese, curator of public projects and education.

“And now we’re flipping that and asking people – what has been essential to them and their experience and what’s really gotten them through this difficult time of living through a global pandemic?”

Morel, a visual artist who has created several outdoor murals in Durham, said she plans to be at the gallery each weekday over the next two weeks to paint the #myessential mural on the walls in The Jennings David Young gallery space.

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It will be her largest mural to date.

“The kids provide the content, which are the images, and I would say the artist’s job is to answer that question – how does it come together?” said Morel, a youth workshop leader.

“That has to do with sitting with the ideas and absorbing them and stewing on them. There’s technical things; I’ll be dealing with composition and I’ve got a colour palette, so I’m concerned with all of those artistic questions. But I do want to really stay faithful to their images. I’m really interested in their images because it does lend their voices to the mural.”

The mural is one component of the community art project #myessential, which officially launched Saturday with the reopening of the gallery, following the recent provincial lockdown. It will run until May 1.

Also part of the project is an invitation to gallery visitors and others to share their answers to the #myessential question.

“I want it to be a project that really has a ripple effect through the community,” McLeese said.

Morel is no stranger to the Tom Thomson Art Gallery. In 2017, the visual artist worked with the gallery on a large-scale mural project involving high school students.

She applied last year to participate in the gallery’s upcoming community artist spotlight, which provides local artists with a chance to display their work in the atrium on a rotating monthly basis.

She said she proposed in her application creating a mural with community input.

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But McLeese said the spotlight series was put on hold due to the lockdown.

While the gallery was closed, staff came up with the #myessential project idea and decided Morel would be the “perfect artist” to lead it.

To kick off the project, Morel led a series of virtual drawing classes last week with Jenn Klemm’s Grade 9 art class at Owen Sound District Secondary School. The 25 students submitted a combined 100 drawings, each answering the #myessential question.

“How JP is translating the mural in this space is through three different vantages – what has been essential in the past, what is essential now and what will be essential in the future?” McLeese said.

“The drawings the students did are really timely. There’s everything from Netflix to cell phones to family members to music to things that have really gotten these kids through a weird time.”

McLeese said John Fearnall’s photography class at OSDSS will be taking on the project this week by responding to the same question, but through digital images.

The gallery will show the students’ photographs on monitors in the #myessential space.

There’s also a table set up with pencils and paper, so visitors can contribute to the project. People can also participate on social media by answering the question in any form – a drawing, poem or photograph, for example – and using the myessential hashtag.

“I think it’s a question that everyone should be thinking about and perhaps haven’t really taken the time to think about what has been vital to them through COVID-19. I think it’s important to really reflect on those things that have been making the days go by and us adapting to this new normal of living,” McLeese said.

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“It’s been so refreshing and invigorating having youth answer this question, but it’s something that our whole community can answer and really get something from. I think it will be a wonderful experience to welcome people back into the art gallery, asking them that question about what has been essential to them through this pandemic.”

Along with the #myessential project, the new exhibition David Beirk: A Sanctuary for Thought also launched Saturday. It features art from the gallery’s collection – some of which has never been presented publicly before – that highlight the late painter’s “anxieties over a threatened ecological landscape and the erosion of beauty, humanism and morality in art,” the gallery says.

The popular exhibition Group of Seven: The View from Here, which showcases the gallery’s collection of Group of Seven works, will also continue.

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Art Fx #10: "Spring Melt" by Janine Marson – Huntsville Doppler – Huntsville Doppler

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Art Fx is a year-long series on Huntsville Doppler featuring Huntsville-area visual artists.

“Spring Melt” is a framed original oil on birch board measuring 8″ x 10″ and is painting #7 from Janine Marson’s Rural Roots Collection, for which she created 50 paintings to honour her roots at Oxtongue.

“Spring Melt” was painted on location at Boyne Creek in Dwight during the spring melt. “The deep mysterious blues contrasted beautifully with the bright white snow and caught my eye enough to want to paint it,” said Janine. “I pulled off to the side of the road and grabbed my trusty paint box to head down closer to the water to sit and paint. I’ve seen this annual melt year after year and it always cheers me up to see the melting ice and trickling waters usher in the promise of spring.

“Next time you drive out towards Dwight, take a peek on your right hand side and you may just catch a glimpse of this ray of hope.”

“Spring Melt” is painting #7 from Janine Marson’s Rural Roots Collection. It is available for $375. (supplied)

About the artist:

Janine Marson is a seasoned artist with a B.A. Fine Art from the University of Guelph and a Diploma of Art and Design from Georgian College. Her art career spans over 30 years creating works of art in all media. Janine shares her wealth of knowledge with students at the Haliburton School of Art and Design and out of her own studio in Huntsville. She created a wildly successful exhibition in 2017 of 100 paintings to honour the 100-year anniversary of Tom Thomson’s death. It was followed by another series called Rural Roots, 50 oil paintings that honoured her roots at Oxtongue, which was revealed June 29, 2019 at the Oxtongue Craft Cabin and Gallery. In 2020 Janine exhibited in the group show LANDED: a Gallery Exhibition Celebrating the Land with her colleagues at The Barn, Hillside.

Janine’s studio is at 2-6 West St. N. in Huntsville. Connect with her at 705.789.6843, online at
janinemarson.com, or on the following social media channels: Facebook @JanineMarsonArt, Instagram @janinemarson, Twitter @throughtomseyes, and LinkedIn @janinemarson.

See more local art in Doppler’s Art Fx series here.

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