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Trudeau tests positive for COVID-19, again – CTV News

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he has tested positive for COVID-19, for the second time.

In a tweet posted Monday morning, Trudeau said he’ll be “following public health guidelines and isolating.”

Last week, Trudeau was in Los Angeles to attend the Summit of the Americas, where he met with a number of top officials, including U.S. President Joe Biden.

“I feel okay, but that’s because I got my shots. So, if you haven’t, get vaccinated – and if you can, get boosted. Let’s protect our healthcare system, each other, and ourselves,” the prime minister posted.

Trudeau was scheduled to speak at a Liberal donor appreciation event in Ottawa on Monday night, instead Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland will be addressing the crowd of fully-vaccinated party loyalists in his absence.

This is his second confirmed COVID-19 infection after testing positive for COVID-19 in January.

The prime minister previously reported being exposed to the virus on two occasions: In March 2020, he went into a 14-day isolation after his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau tested positive for COVID-19, and in late December 2021 he announced he was testing regularly and self-monitoring after some members of his staff and security detail tested positive.

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Wildfire near Jasper National Park prompts evacuation order and highway closures

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A wildfire in Alberta is forcing a well-known mountain community to evacuate.

An evacuation order has been issued for the town of Jasper, with residents being advised to head west on Highway 16 to British Columbia. Highway 16 has also been closed for westbound travel at the Jasper Park gates, on the east side.

Eastbound access to Jasper will also be blocked, and Highway 93 along the Athabasca River is also closed.

Parks Canada said earlier Monday evening that its fire crews and the Jasper Fire Department were responding to a wildfire around the town’s transfer station, located approximately nine kilometres northeast of the Jasper townsite.

An Alberta Emergency Alert that was issued at 10:18 p.m. stated the fire was expected to reach the community in five hours, and that everyone in the town and park needed to leave.

The alert was later corrected to say that people in the community had up to five hours to evacuate.

RCMP are advising that travel is not recommended west of Hinton, Alta.

“Please avoid the Jasper National Park area along Highway 16 and allow First Responders to do their jobs safely,” RCMP said in a news release.

All people evacuating the area are being encouraged to slow down and use their headlights, as smoke and ash may reduce visibility.

Parks Canada said in an earlier Facebook post that evacuations had already taken place at numerous campgrounds, as well as the Athabasca Hostel and the Palisades Stewardship and Education Centre.

“Parks Canada is responding to multiple wildfire starts. This is an evolving and dynamic situation,” the agency said in the post.

About 7,500 people in Alberta were under evacuation orders Monday.

The three communities that make up Little Red River Cree Nation — John D’Or Prairie, Fox Lake and Garden River — remain under evacuation order as the out-of-control Semo Wildfire Complex burns nearby. It’s estimated to be more than 960 square kilometres in size.

“The next 48 hours is pretty critical,” Chief Conroy Sewepagaham said in a video update on Facebook.

“The dozer groups are going to be working 24-7. They’re going to do whatever they can to extend Highway 58 towards High Level, and extending the northern portion of the highway going into Garden River.”

Alberta Wildfire said the nearby blaze had reached Highway 58, the only road out of Garden River, and was 13 kilometres northwest of the community itself as of Monday afternoon.

Residents of the northern communities of Chipewyan Lake and Janvier 194 have also been ordered to leave.

More than 160 wildfires are burning across Alberta. They have been coughing up clouds of smoke that are obscuring the sky and are hazardous to health.

However, there’s so much smoke that wildfires are being shaded from the sun and daytime temperature highs in some areas are cooler than forecast, leading to reduced fire activity.

“When smoke clears, we can expect to see increased and significant fire behaviour due to anticipated continuing hot, dry weather,” Alberta Wildfire said in an update Monday.

Environment Canada said cooler temperatures were expected to start moving into northwestern parts of the province starting Monday night, though hot conditions may persist through much of the week farther south.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 22, 2024.

— By Rob Drinkwater and Curtis Ng in Edmonton

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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Kamala Harris endorsement excites Democrats, but what could it mean for Canada? – CTV News

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Kamala Harris endorsement excites Democrats, but what could it mean for Canada?  CTV News

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K’omoks First Nation signs draft treaty with B.C., federal governments

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COURTENAY, BRITISH COLUMBIA – Officials with the K’omoks First Nation and the B.C. and federal governments have signed a draft treaty in a step toward the nation’s self-governance.

K’omoks Chief Ken Price says it was an “exciting, memorable, and emotional day” for the community on Vancouver Island as it marked another step toward a treaty.

Price says in a statement that many K’omoks leaders have been part of negotiations over the last 30 years aiming to “build the best treaty possible.”

He says treaties are “the highest form of reconciliation between nations.”

The draft treaty must still be ratified by a vote among K’omoks members, and Price says the next step is to ensure questions are answered to ensure their community members feel they are making an informed decision.

A statement from Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada says the initialling marks a milestone on the nation’s path to self-governance.

If the 351 registered K’omoks members vote to ratify the treaty, the statement says the B.C. and federal governments would then adopt it through legislation.

The full ratification process is expected to take three years, with the treaty coming into effect in 2028, the statement says.

The minister of Crown-Indigenous relations, Gary Anandasangaree, says the initialling “marks a pivotal step away from centuries of colonial policies.”

“After 30 years of negotiations involving K’omoks, Canada, and British Columbia, this treaty embodies transformative policy innovations crucial to advancing reconciliation,” he says in the statement. “For Canada, achieving this milestone … represents a significant stride toward genuine nation-to-nation relationships built on mutual respect, partnership, and the full recognition of rights.”

K’omoks is the latest First Nations to sign a draft treaty with the federal and provincial governments, following proposed deals with the Kitselas Nation and the Kitsumkalum Band, part of the Tsimshian First Nation in B.C.’s northwest.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 22, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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