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Turksat launches 5A satellite – Broadband TV News

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Turkey’s minister of transport and infrastructure Adil Karaismailoglu has announced the successful launch of the Turksat 5A satellite.

In a statement published by Turksat, he said that the first signals from the satellite, which was launched by SpaceX on a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral in Florida, were received after 35 minutes and its journey in settled orbit will take four months, after which Turksat will undertake tests and Turksat 5A will be activated.

Karaismailoglu added that Turksat 5B and 6A will follow 5A. “We are planning to launch our Turksat 5B satellite, which is currently being manufactured and tested, in June”.

He also said that work on the domestic and national satellite Turksat 6A is also continuing, with its launch planned for the first months of 2022.

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Confirmed COVID-19 case at Vernon's Carrington Place seniors home – Vernon News – Castanet.net

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A staff member at a Vernon seniors home has come down with a confirmed case of COVID-19.

Twyla Wygle, spokesperson for Carrington Place, says a casual, part-time employee has tested positive for the coronavirus.

“They are a very casual employee, and they haven’t been in the building for several days,” Wygle said.

She says Interior Health was immediately notified of the case, and the health authority determined the risk of exposure was low.

“We’ve taken several extra steps to be careful,” said Wygle, including keeping residents confined to their rooms “for the next few days.”

“We want to take that extra precaution and watch for any symptoms…. For the time being, residents are having their meals in the rooms.”

The single case is the first at Carrington, and is not considered an outbreak.

Meanwhile, confirmed outbreaks continue at Noric House and Heritage Square in Vernon.

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You can see Uranus, Mars and the moon get close in a rare night sky sight tonight – Yahoo Eurosport UK

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 Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.
Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.
Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.
Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.

Look up tonight (Jan. 21) to see Uranus and Mars nestled together in the night sky — just don’t forget your binoculars.

Yesterday (Jan. 20) on Inauguration Day in the U.S., the two planets were in conjunction, meaning they appeared very close together in the sky. Tonight, the planets will share the same “right ascension,” with Mars passing just 1.75 degrees to the north of Uranus, according to Earthsky.org. (Your fist held at arm’s length covers about 10 degrees of sky.) The moon will also be shining nearby, making it a good landmark to start from when looking for the planets.

Uranus, the seventh planet in our solar system, which orbits 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers) from the sun, will be at a magnitude 5.8 in the sky. Meanwhile, Mars, the fourth planet from the sun, which orbits at an average distance of “just” 143.6 million miles (231.1 million km), will be visible at magnitude 0.2. 

The brightest planets in January’s night sky: How to see them (and when)

The lower the magnitude number a cosmic object has, the brighter it is (there are even seriously bright objects with negative magnitudes), so Mars will be significantly brighter in the sky than Uranus. But, while Uranus will be tough to spot, both will still be visible with the help of binoculars, though the planets will be too far separated to fit within a telescope’s field of view, according to in-the-sky.org

To try and find Uranus, first “find the crescent moon and the Red Planet in the couple of hours after it gets dark. Scan your way over from Mars toward the moon, and you should be able to find the faint, bluish disk of Uranus,” NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said in its monthly “What’s Up” skywatching series. 

Now, while Uranus and Mars will be putting on this show in the night sky, they won’t be the only planets hanging out tonight. Both Jupiter and Saturn are still officially in the evening sky, though the light from the setting sun makes it so they are not visible, according to Earthsky.org.

Email Chelsea Gohd at cgohd@space.com or follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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Mars and Uranus conjunction: How to see the planet's in the sky – Daily Express

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The relatively nearby Mars and the far out Uranus are adorning the night’s sky, and are visible right now. Mars is the planet next out behind Earth in the solar system’s pecking order, while Uranus is the seventh.

However, Uranus is a true giant of the solar system and can be spotted on a clear night when its orbit aligns with Earth’s.

Uranus is a staggering 2.9 billion kilometres from the Sun and takes 84 years to complete an orbit of the star.

The planet aligns with Earth roughly once a year, and this time around it can be seen travelling alongside Mars.

Mars, which has a similar orbit to Earth, has been travelling near to our planet for several months, but as Earth’s orbit is slightly smaller, it is currently outpacing the Red Planet.

Both planets are separated by just 1.75 degrees – with one degree being close to a thumb’s width held at arm’s length.

To spot the two planets, look in the southwest skies come nightfall.

Above the Moon, you will see a ‘star’ with a red hue, which is actually Mars.

As the Moon moves away from Mars, the planet will become more visible as there is less light pollution from our lunar satellite.

READ MORE: NASA InSight’s ‘mole’ fails mission after two years on Mars

“But Mars still shines on a par with the sky’s brightest stars.

“Uranus, on the other hand, is quite faint, well over 150 times fainter than Mars.

“Uranus is said to be the outermost of the sun’s planets visible with the eye alone.

“But seeing it with the eye requires a very dark sky, and probably no Moon (certainly no nearby Moon).”

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