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UK teens use TikTok hacks to create fake COVID-19 positive test reports to bunk school – Republic World

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In a bizarre viral trend going on TikTok, UK teenagers are picking up hacks and tips to produce fake COVID-19 positive tests as an excuse to bunk school. There is an ongoing rain of Clips of young people applying various liquids to lateral flow tests that have racked up millions of views on the popular video app. 

Videos are being uploaded under hashtags which are offering ridiculous suggestions. Among several viral hashtags, there are – #fakecovidtest, which has gathered more than 6.5 million views. Also, another dedicated account @.fakecovidtests has been gaining more than 20,000 followers since its inception. 

While talking to the media, Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders has warned that the trend is “massively unhelpful” and has urged the parents to ensure that tests are not being misused. “We are sure this involves a very small minority of pupils, and that for the most part the tests are used correctly,” Barton told iNews UK.

While speaking on the issue, a TikTok spokesperson told the publication that the platform removes misinformation related to COVID-19. He also added that the social media platform has joined hands with vigilant specialists, who are tracking and removing any misinformation, especially on Covid-19. 

“Our community guidelines make clear that we remove content which includes misleading information that causes harm, including medical misinformation related to Covid-19, and anti-vaccine disinformation more broadly. Since the start of the pandemic, we have worked to provide our community with access to trusted information, and through our partnership with Team Halo, scientists from all over the world have shared how vaccinations are created and tested for safety.”

The Viral Trend

In order to encourage kids from staying away from school, the viral TikTok handles are suggesting products like apple sauce, Coca-Cola, vinegar, hand sanitiser, and kiwi fruit apply to the tests in the hope of testing positive for COVID-19. 

Teenagers have also gone as far as using Calpol cough medicine, lemon juice, orange juice, Lynx deodorant, and Dior aftershave on rapid antigen tests. As per an Independent fact-checking organisation Full Fact, fizzy drinks and fizzy drinks and acidic fruits can appear to break the test into displaying what looks like a positive result.

While speaking to Full Fact, Associate professor in Biomedical Technology at the University of Reading Dr. Alexander Edwards has clarified that if the lateral flow device (LFD) is used for purposes other than it is allotted for, then one should expect a “silly result.”

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Astronomers Found a Crater From The Mystery Rocket That Smashed Into The Moon – ScienceAlert

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The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) – NASA’s eye-in-the-sky in orbit around the Moon – has found the crash site of the mystery rocket booster that slammed into the far side of the Moon back on 4 March 2022.

The LRO images, taken May 25th, revealed not just a single crater, but a double crater formed by the rocket’s impact, posing a new mystery for astronomers to unravel.

Why a double crater? While somewhat unusual – none of the Apollo S-IVBs that hit the Moon created double craters – they’re not impossible to create, especially if an object hits at a low angle. But that doesn’t seem to be the case here.

Astronomer Bill Gray, who first discovered the object and predicted its lunar demise back in January, explains that the booster “came in at about 15 degrees from vertical. So that’s not the explanation for this one.”

The impact site consists of an 18-meter-wide eastern crater superimposed on a 16-meter-wide western crater. Mark Robinson, Principal Investigator of the LRO Camera team, proposes that this double crater formation might result from an object with distinct, large masses at each end.

Before (2022-02-28) and after image (2022-05-21) of the Moon. (NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University)

“Typically a spent rocket has mass concentrated at the motor end; the rest of the rocket stage mainly consists of an empty fuel tank. Since the origin of the rocket body remains uncertain, the double nature of the crater may help to indicate its identity,” he said.

So what is it?

It’s a long story. The unidentified rocket first came to astronomers’ attention earlier this year when it was identified as a SpaceX upper stage, which had launched NASA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) to the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange Point in 2015.

Gray, who designs software that tracks space debris, was alerted to the object when his software pinged an error. He told The Washington Post on January 26 that “my software complained because it couldn’t project the orbit past March 4, and it couldn’t do it because the rocket had hit the Moon.”

Gray spread the word, and the story made the rounds in late January – but a few weeks later, he received an email from Jon Giorgini at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL).

Giorgini pointed out that DSCOVR’s trajectory shouldn’t have taken the booster anywhere near the Moon. In an effort to reconcile the conflicting trajectories, Gray began to dig back into his data, where he discovered that he had misidentified the DSCOVR booster way back in 2015.

SpaceX wasn’t the culprit after all. But there was definitely still an object hurtling towards the Moon. So what was it?

A bit of detective work led Gray to determine it was actually the upper stage of China’s Chang’e 5-T1 mission, a 2014 technology demonstration mission that lay the groundwork for Chang’e 5, which successfully returned a lunar sample to Earth in 2020 (incidentally, China recently announced it would follow up this sample return mission with a more ambitious Mars sample return project later this decade). 

Jonathan McDowell offered some corroborating evidence that seemed to bolster this new theory for the object’s identity.

The mystery was solved.

Except, days later, China’s Foreign Minister claimed it was not their booster: it had deorbited and crashed into the ocean shortly after launch.

As it stands now, Gray remains convinced it was the Change 5-T1 booster that hit the Moon, proposing that the Foreign Minister made an honest mistake, confusing Chang’e 5-T1 with the similarly named Chang’e 5 (whose booster did indeed sink into the ocean).

As for the new double crater on the Moon, the fact that the LRO team was able to find the impact site so quickly is an impressive feat in itself. It was discovered mere months after impact, with a little help from Gray and JPL, who each independently narrowed the search area down to a few dozen kilometers.

For comparison, The Apollo 16 S-IVB impact site took more than six years of careful searching to find.

Bill Gray’s account of the booster identification saga is here, as well as his take on the double crater impact. The LRO images can be found here.

This article was originally published by Universe Today. Read the original article.

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New Zealand Says It's Set to 'Star' in NASA's Return to the Moon – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — New Zealand is trumpeting its role in a plan to return humans to the Moon, saying it is set to star in NASA’s Capstone mission that will test the orbit for a lunar space station.

Rocket Lab has announced it will launch a satellite from Mahia, New Zealand, to test the lunar orbit for Gateway, a planned Moon-orbiting outpost that will provide astronauts with access to the lunar surface. Separately, New Zealand’s government said Monday it has signed an agreement with NASA to conduct new research to track spacecraft approaching and orbiting the Moon.

“The New Zealand space sector is set to star in NASA’s Capstone Moon mission,” said Andrew Johnson, manager of the New Zealand Space Agency. Launching into lunar orbit from New Zealand is “a significant milestone,” while the new research “will be increasingly important as more countries and private actors send spacecraft to the Moon,” he said.

NASA’s Artemis Program plans to return humans to the lunar surface as early as 2025, renewing human exploration of the Moon and progressing toward the exploration of Mars. It plans to land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon and explore more of the lunar surface than ever before.

Rocket Lab said it could launch the CubeSat satellite as soon as Tuesday, with the launch window open through July 27.  

New Zealand’s agreement with NASA will see a University of Canterbury-led research team, which includes contributors from the University of Auckland and the University of New South Wales in Australia, attempt to track spacecraft from observatories in Tekapo and Canberra. 

The scientists intend to validate their observations and algorithms to predict spacecraft trajectories enroute to the Moon and within their lunar orbits against NASA’s Capstone mission data.

©2022 Bloomberg L.P.

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See the moon shine near Mercury before dawn on Monday as it concludes its planet tour – Space.com

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Look to the east-northeastern horizon before dawn on Monday (June 27) to see the moon wrap up its monthly tour of the morning plants with Mercury. 

“The silver sliver of the old moon‘s crescent will shine several finger widths to the upper left (or 3.5 degrees to the celestial north) of the bright dot of Mercury,” writes Chris Vaughan, amateur astronomer with SkySafari Software who oversees Space.com’s Night Sky calendar.

The pair will be close enough to share the view of a pair of binoculars (represented by the green circle in the image). But Vaughan warns observers to turn optics away from the eastern horizon before the sun rises. 

Related: The brightest planets in June’s night sky: How to see them (and when)

The moon may be rather tricky to spot at first glance as it will be a very thin crescent, only 3% illuminated, according to Space.com’s skywatching columnist Joe Rao

If you’re after an extra skywatching challenge, look out for Aldebaran. The orange first-magnitude star will be shining about 7 degrees to the left of Mercury according to Rao. 

Monday morning is also your last good chance to catch a glimpse of the moon joining in with the rare planetary alignment that has been present this month. Throughout June left to right Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn have lined up in their orbital order from left to right in the southeastern sky. 

Hoping to capture a good photo of the moon and mercury? Our guide on how to photograph the moon has some helpful tips. If you’re looking for a camera, here’s our overview of the best cameras for astrophotography and best lenses for astrophotography. As always, our guides for the best telescopes and best binoculars can help you prepare for the next great skywatching event.

Editor’s note: If you take a photograph of the moon near Mercury, let us know! You can send images and comments in to spacephotos@space.com.

Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom (opens in new tab) and on Facebook

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