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Ukrainian art auctioned at Coventry Cathedral for war effort – bbc.com

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Pavel PimkinJamie Gray

Paintings created by Ukrainian artists, including a 10-year-old girl, are to be auctioned, helping to raise money for those affected by war in the country.

About 50 paintings will go on show at Coventry Cathedral during an annual peace conference, ahead of the sale.

Many of the artists featured fled their country during the conflict.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Half of the proceeds will go towards funding items most needed, like food, medical supplies and ambulance cars, with the rest going to the artists.

Kyiv on fire

Anastasia Orlova

Viktoriia Sydorova, aged 10, was forced to leave her home in Kyiv for Rivne in western Ukraine earlier this year, after previously being evacuated from Donetsk in 2014.

Now living in the UK, she said she remembered having to spend nights in bomb shelters and underground stations “with all the people who were hiding from rockets”.

“My favourite painting is of the woman with fire around her and pictures of a house, plants, animals and books – all of the things that I miss from home,” she said.

Ukrainian art

Viktoriia Sydorova

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Another artist, Yevheniia Zhydkova, 42, fled to Moldova from her home in Gostomel, outside Kyiv.

She describes travelling with her child and three pets with more than 30 helicopters hovering over her home.

“I was fortunate that my car was not noticed by Russian soldiers,” she said.

“My paintings are a way of downloading my emotions somewhere, as I could not stand them being only inside my head.”

Ukrainian art

Maryna Steblina

The paintings have “historical significance” said Pavel Pimkin, president of the Coventry University Ukrainian Society and auction organiser.

“I am looking forward to seeing this inspiring collection of paintings go under the hammer and bring Ukrainian art to a wider audience,” he said.

The auction will take place during Coventry University’s Rising Global Peace Forum at the cathedral on 9 November, with art also available to buy online via the Coventry Ukrainian Society website.

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Hands-on art installation takes shape at college campus

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Artist Jill Price is showcasing some of her new art, called UN/making the Frame, at The Campus Gallery at Georgian College in Barrie.

Visitors will find in the printed handout that they are invited to “put on a suit, smell, water, zest, taste, move, touch, and rearrange elements in the space,” which helps illustrate “everyday performances that help to visualize how still-life paintings are neither two-dimensional nor still, and that the actions of humans matter.”

Price, a past instructor in Georgian College’s fundamental art and fine art programs, is an interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of several Queen’s University awards.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Her artwork has been shown may times overs the years going back to 2000 — in solo shows, as well as juried, group and invitational exhibitions across Ontario.

This particular exhibit “presents multiple assemblages that point to how a plastic garbage can or a ‘mere bowl of fruit’ whether painted or in the flesh, are all part of our animate and interconnected ecologies.”

“Embracing the ready-made for its potential to delineate space as well as bring attention to the accumulation and ‘liveliness’ of everyday objects.”

The arranging, placement and use of the objects is solely up to the viewer as they walk through the gallery.

There is also a stop-motion video screen that draws the visitor in to witness Price as she plays out the process of creating the pieces and documents the time, labour and the materials that were used in the artworks.

This whimsical and hands-on experience can be viewed at The Campus Gallery until Dec. 4.

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Art

Hands-on art installation takes shape at college campus

Published

 on

Artist Jill Price is showcasing some of her new art, called UN/making the Frame, at The Campus Gallery at Georgian College in Barrie.

Visitors will find in the printed handout that they are invited to “put on a suit, smell, water, zest, taste, move, touch, and rearrange elements in the space,” which helps illustrate “everyday performances that help to visualize how still-life paintings are neither two-dimensional nor still, and that the actions of humans matter.”

Price, a past instructor in Georgian College’s fundamental art and fine art programs, is an interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of several Queen’s University awards.

Her artwork has been shown may times overs the years going back to 2000 — in solo shows, as well as juried, group and invitational exhibitions across Ontario.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

This particular exhibit “presents multiple assemblages that point to how a plastic garbage can or a ‘mere bowl of fruit’ whether painted or in the flesh, are all part of our animate and interconnected ecologies.”

“Embracing the ready-made for its potential to delineate space as well as bring attention to the accumulation and ‘liveliness’ of everyday objects.”

The arranging, placement and use of the objects is solely up to the viewer as they walk through the gallery.

There is also a stop-motion video screen that draws the visitor in to witness Price as she plays out the process of creating the pieces and documents the time, labour and the materials that were used in the artworks.

This whimsical and hands-on experience can be viewed at The Campus Gallery until Dec. 4.

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Ukrainian avant-garde art finds refuge from war in Madrid – Reuters

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MADRID, Nov 29 (Reuters) – Ukrainian art has found a refuge in Madrid where a retrospective on the country’s avant-garde in the early 20th century is showing works little known to the general public while offering them a safe haven away from the bombs.

On Tuesday, the Spanish capital’s Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum inaugurated the exhibit “In the Eye of the Storm. Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s”. It showcases a collection of about 70 artworks in various formats representing different trends, from figurative art to futurism and constructivism.

Aside from paying tribute to a little-known period in the history of Ukrainian art, the exhibition takes on particular relevance amid Russia’s ongoing invasion of the country.

“We wanted to do something in terms of showing Ukrainian art, but also taking Ukrainian art out of Ukraine and bringing it to Europe and to safety,” Katia Denysova, one of the exhibit’s three curators, told Reuters.

Denysova, who described her journey out of Ukraine as a “rollercoaster”, said that transporting the works through a country at war into the European Union ran into numerous challenges.

They included the temporary closure of borders in response to the impact of a stray missile on neighbouring Polish soil, which sparked fears of an escalation two weeks ago.

When the curators saw the works had made it to Spain safe and sound, they were “beyond delighted”, Denysova added.

She now hopes that Ukrainian avant-garde art will tell the public a story of creation and resistance.

“This is an integral part of our heritage, of our culture in Ukraine. This is what Ukrainians are fighting for right now.”

Reporting by Darío Fernández, Silvio Castellanos and Michael Gore; Editing by David Latona and Mark Heinrich

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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