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Vancouver real estate: backyard or laneway house in Kitsilano sold for $1850000 – Straight.com

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Call it a coach house, carriage home, or laneway house.

Some also refer to this type of residence as a granny suite or garden home.

They’re all the same.

Typically located at the rear of a principal home, a coach or laneway house constitutes a detached and separate dwelling.

They can be pricey.

A backyard house on the west side of Vancouver sold for more than the price of a typical single family home on the east side of the city.

The laneway home at 1959 West 15th Avenue fetched $1,850,000.

In July 2020, a typical detached home on the east side of Vancouver cost $1,487,300.

Sutton Group-West Coast Realty listed the West 15th Avenue carriage house on August 18, 2020 for $1,898,000.

A buyer purchased the two-level home after four days on August 22 with a $48,000 price discount.

<span class="picturefill" data-picture data-alt="The laneway property is shown here at the back of the principal house addressed as 1955 and 1957 West 15th Avenue.”>
The laneway property is shown here at the back of the principal house addressed as 1955 and 1957 West 15th Avenue.

Single family homes cost more on the west side neighbourhoods like Kitsilano.

In July this year, a typical single family home on the west side of Vancouver cost $3,053,900.

The 1959 West 15th Avenue features three bedrooms, and two-and-a-half baths.

Real-estate site fisherly.com tracked the sale.

The home boasts of a living space of 1,555 square feet.

“This 2 level Detached (Coach/Carriage) home is part of 3 units Heritage style Townhome,” the property’s listing reads.

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Breaking down the real estate space – Wealth Professional

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Real estate has been one of the more interesting asset classes during the pandemic. On the one hand, markets such as the GTA and Vancouver have seen residential demand go through the roof, while other areas of the country have dried up. Office spaces that were vibrant, are now quiet and are posing question about the future of tenancy. Meanwhile, areas of the industrial space are booming thanks to the demand for e-commerce, distribution and data centres. Yet while those demands are up, publicly traded REITs are down, making it more difficult for advisors looking to gain exposure to the space. 

“We are very strong believes in diversification for portfolios, real estate is similar to other assets where you take different angles to achieve diversification. That tends to be geography, property type and risk strategy,” says Colin Lynch, head of global real estate investments at TD Asset Management. “You can’t predict the nature a shock, but you can construct a portfolio that has the adequate balance, exposure and risk parameters to ensure it performs well in great and tough economic times.”

While some are quick to point fingers at specific sectors underperforming, Lynch says he looks more within the sectors themselves. One area, retail for example, has had positive stories with essential services like groceries and pharmaceutical. Whereas shopping malls were hit hard during the shutdown and could see changes in consumer behavior. “Early indications have been that foot traffic isn’t back to normal levels. People are being more purposeful entering malls, going to a particular store, making a purchase and departing.”

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Adventures in real estate: How the pandemic is changing the way we live now – Toronto Life

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Upsize, downsize, flee to the country, live on a boat, buy an RV, get a farm, shack up with the in-laws, and other life-altering changes Torontonians are making in these crazy times

Photograph by George Pimentel

The smart money this pandemic year was on manufacturers of trampolines, pools and, yep, top-loading washers. Wherever you looked, the answer was sold out, check back later. Some enterprising types tried scalping above-ground pool kits. Stuck indoors in our sweatpants, we craved a jump, a dip and in-home laundry. Most of all, we craved space.

Despite the unemployed chefs and empty theatres and ghost-town corporate core, despite the iffy assurances that it’s okay to send your kids back to school, despite the seemingly permanent undercurrent of volatility making our daily lives so queasy—despite everything—home prices and sales just kept climbing. Weirdest of all, after a few soft months during the pandemic’s earliest stages, sales spiked. In August, there was a 20.1 per cent increase in the average house price compared to August of last year, and a 40.3 per cent jump in sales. Even the price of condos—you know, those super-dense glass towers where residents freak out about sharing elevators—won’t quit. By August, condo prices had climbed 9.5 per cent. So much for the theory that the only buyers were Airbnb speculators.

What’s going on? We offer a few theories. First is that our (fingers and toes crossed) success at flattening the curve and reopening parts of the economy means we’re good and ready to buy again. Then there’s the likelihood that we’ve all got calamity survivor syndrome, leaping into major life changes (getting married, getting pregnant, signing a mortgage) as a kind of promise ring for a brighter future.

The simplest answer: in a world where we measure personal safety in two-metre increments and spend our evenings sewing masks, a safe haven is our most valuable commodity. We’ve all become ruthless cost-benefit analysts of personal space. If you live in an apartment, this is the year to score a place with another bedroom to use as a home office. Or maybe you decided to buy—according to a survey this summer by Mortgage Professionals Canada, twice as many renters as in 2019 planned to purchase in the next year. If you live in a house, you want a bigger yard (for those trampolines and pools) or another storey so you can hide from the kids. Or maybe you’re feeling the urgency to give up on the city, sell your place in a bidding war (still happening!) and live out your fantasy of tending crops on an organic farm where your only neighbours are emus whose wool you weave into your own sack dresses (a July Ontario Real Estate Association survey found that 61 per cent of respondents wanted to move to the suburbs or countryside).

At the moment (but hopefully not for long), so much of what we take for granted about city living now falls into the category of unnecessary risk—belting out show tunes at karaoke, ditching work for Hanlan’s Point, navigating bustling sidewalks. No wonder everyone wants an escape, whether in an RV, a starter yacht or a cottage. (Prices increased in Muskoka by 15 per cent year over year between January and the end of May, and sales were up 73 per cent for the month of June.)

In the linked stories above, you’ll meet people who decided this was the year to take a leap and spring for that RV, buy that farm or put a down payment on that downtown condo. We might not have a vaccine (digits crossed on that one, too), but at least we’ve learned how to shelter in place in the best ways possible.


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Adventures in Real Estate: “I left Toronto, found the love of my life and bought 14 goats” – Toronto Life

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Adventures in Real Estate: “I left Toronto, found the love of my life and bought 14 goats”

Marli Seheult, 31

Operations coordinator at a downtown spa, now living in Arthur

In February, I met a guy online named Jeff who lives on a 72-acre hobby farm in Arthur, about 40 kilometres north of Guelph, with his parents. At the time, I was living in a two-bedroom apartment at Church and Adelaide with a roommate and my three dogs.

Jeff and I were talking a lot, and I could tell he was very family oriented, especially from the way he talked about his four-year-old son. I lived on a farm in Stratford as a young kid, and we bonded over our shared love of rural life.

I wanted to go and meet him, but I was really busy with work. Plus, I have three dogs, so how would I bring them up to Arthur for a date?  Then Covid happened. I told Jeff I’d put myself in a two-week quarantine and then go visit him in Arthur.

He’s got his own space there, a suite attached to the main house, so we had privacy. After three days of hanging out together, we both knew it was love. Three days turned into a month, which turned into two months. I was able to work remotely, and it felt irresponsible to be going back and forth to Toronto anyway. I kept saying, “Okay, I’ll go home next week,” but we kept pushing it back. Then, at the end of July, we drove to Toronto, packed up my stuff and I moved to the farm for good.

Jeff and his parents only recently got Internet (he didn’t know what Netflix was, which I found cute), so I’ve been showing them all about it. Jeff’s mom loves Kijiji—we just went crazy and bought 14 goats online.

I’m breeding for other breeders, not for meat, so my males will be sold for a high price—roughly $400 each.

We’re living in the in-law suite, and it’s nice and private. I’ve gotten to know Jeff’s four-year-old son, so in addition to becoming a goat breeder, I have a four-year-old best friend, too.

I call my partner’s parents my in-laws.

It was a pretty sudden transition, but I’m spontaneous by nature. There was some shock from some friends and family, but then they saw how in love we are and how excited I was about starting something with him.

I think we’re just at that age where we’re ready to settle down. Ours is a family farm, so eventually, when his parents get older, we’ll take over all the chores and duties. What started as a three-day date has turned into the rest of my life.

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